Street

Here’s the Real-Life Story Behind ‘Reefa,’ a New HBO Max Film About the Life and Death of a Miami Street Artist


This weekend, a new biopic of sorts will arrive on HBO Max, telling the story of Israel Hernandez-Llach, a real-life Miami street artist who was killed by police in August 2013.

Hernandez-Llach, 18 at the time, was spray-painting an abandoned McDonald’s when a local police unit approached. The artist fled; the officers chased and ultimately stopped the high-schooler with a taser. Hernandez-Llach later died in their custody. 

After dropping their target, the officers exchanged high-fives, according to the young artist’s friends who witnessed the incident. 

Dramatized versions of those moments form the climax of Reefa, the film written and directed by Miami-based filmmaker Jessica Kavana Dornbusch and named after Hernandez-Llach’s graffiti name.  

The rest of the movie, meanwhile, lays out the stakes for the titular subject in the summer leading up to that fateful night, often with a heavy dose of creative license.

Hernandez-Llach is depicted as a voraciously creative, constantly skateboarding, and skirting choleric cops through neon-lit streets, or butting heads with his father, a Colombian immigrant anxiously awaiting the arrival of green cards for his family. He wants to move to New York for art school.

The film opens with the street artist plotting his “magnum opus”: a statement mural on a derelict Miami hotel (a stand-in for the McDonald’s) that will introduce him to the city’s art world.

“I wanted to focus on Israel’s life in the last couple of weeks before he passed away,” Dornbusch told CBSMiami in April. “He had just gotten an art scholarship. He was about to go to New York. He had found love for the first time. He was spending time painting and time with his family and friends, and then the tragic ending.”

Originally meant for the 2020 Miami Film Festival (which was canceled because of the pandemic), Reefa debuted this spring on video-on-demand and in a few theaters. The movie will likely command its biggest audience yet when it hits HBO this weekend.

“Sadly, we could not plan a more timely moment in history to release this film,” Dornbusch said. “I think it will resonate. It puts a name and a face to the statistics.” 

Dornbusch worked on Reefa for more than six years, she explained in a recent blog post. Getting the project off the ground was a grind involved multiple fundraising efforts and a run-in with the Miami Beach police that resulted in the production temporarily being shut down. 

Tyler Dean Flores, the Harlem-born, Puerto Rican actor who plays Hernandez-Llach in the film, told CBS that he hopes “it raises a ton of awareness on his case and plenty of other cases that involve police brutality.” 

“I also hope that people feel very inspired by Israel’s family’s creativity and pursuit of whatever their passions are,” Flores added. “No matter what situations you’re in, if you want to create, create. If you want to express yourself, express yourself.”

A still from "Reefa" (2020). Courtesy of Vertical Entertainment.

A still from Reefa (2020). Courtesy of Vertical Entertainment.

Following their son’s death, Hernandez-Llach’s parents held a press conference in which they called for an independent investigation. Roughly two years later, in 2015, a Miami-Dade attorney announced that no criminal charges would be filed against the officers involved in the incident, saying that medical examiners had determined the death to be accidental.

In 2017, the City of Miami Beach reportedly paid $100,000 to settle a wrongful-death lawsuit filed by the victim’s family. They admitted no wrongdoing. 

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A Street Artist Is Suing the Vatican—and Turned Down a Meeting With the Pope—After She Says It Used Her Art Without Permission


Roman street artist Alessia Babrow is suing the Vatican after its coin and postage agency printed her artwork on a stamp without permission.

Babrow’s image depicts a painting by 19th-century German artist Heinrich Hofmann of Jesus with her own tag of a heart reading “just use it” written across his chest. She pasted the work, which she made in 2019, near the Ponte Vittorio Emanuele II bridge by the Vatican, but never expected it to catch the eye of church officials.

Then the Vatican issued a special stamp for Easter 2020 featuring the street art piece. It credited Hofmann, but not Babrow, who first learned of the stamp through Instagram.

“I couldn’t believe it. I honestly thought it was a joke,” Babrow told the Associated Press. “The real shock was that you don’t expect certain things from certain organizations.”

The Philatelic and Numismatic Office of the Vatican City State didn't ask permission to use Alessia Babrow's street art based on a 19th century Heinrich Hoffmann painting for a 2020 Easter stamp. Image courtesy of the Philatelic and Numismatic Office of the Vatican City State.

The Philatelic and Numismatic Office of the Vatican City State didn’t ask permission to use Alessia Babrow’s street art based on a 19th century Heinrich Hoffmann painting for a 2020 Easter stamp. Image courtesy of the Philatelic and Numismatic Office of the Vatican City State.

Mauro Olivieri, director of the Vatican Philatelic Office, reportedly spotted Babrow’s work while riding by on a moped. He told Il Mio Papa magazine that he stopped in his tracks, undeterred by honking traffic, to photograph the piece. The Vatican, which did not return a request for comment, does not currently acknowledge Babrow’s authorship of the image on its website.

The artist said that when she reached out to the Vatican, she was offered an audience with the pope and some free stamps in lieu of compensation. Babrow sent three letters asking the Vatican for recognition of her copyright before taking legal action, according to Vaccari News.

The artist has been making street art since 2013, and said she usually leaves her work unsigned. “I am considered a mix between Marina Abramovic and Banksy,” Babrow told Drago. “At least this is what some of the critics have written, and whether it is true or not, I am flattered!

Babrow is seeking €130,000 ($160,000) in damages. The case is set to be heard in court on December 7.

The Vatican turned his Alessia Babrow street art piece, seen here near the Vatican, into a 2020 Easter stamp without her consent. Photo by Alessia Babrow.

The Vatican turned this Alessia Babrow street art piece, seen here near the Vatican, into a 2020 Easter stamp. Photo by Alessia Babrow.

The Vatican is selling the stamps for €1.15 ($1.40), and has issued a print run of 80,000 stamps, according to Artribune, which first reported news of the stamp’s appearance in February 2020. The first run reportedly sold out.

Babrow’s lawsuit comes amid a growing push by street artists to protect the copyright of their work. Banksy won a 2019 case against an Italian museum selling merchandise based on his work, though experienced a setback this year when the European Union Intellectual Property Office ruled that his trademark was invalid, scuttling his lawsuit against a greeting card company.

“Suing the Vatican was not really part of my plans,” Babrow told Il Fatto Quotidiano, noting that she has been known to allow the use of her work for free, but not without permission. “Unfortunately, this story is bigger than me.”

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Art Observers Scratch Their Heads as the Uffizi’s First Expansion Into Contemporary Art Is a Mark Wahlberg-Themed Piece of Street Art


In a puzzling move, Florence’s Uffizi Gallery, renowned for its unparalleled collection of Italian Renaissance masterpieces, has accepted the donation of a piece by contemporary British street artist Endless.

The artist, who does not appear to have ever had a museum exhibition, is a strange fit for a collection best known for such art historical luminaries as Sandro Botticelli, Raphael, and Leonardo da Vinci. Nevertheless, Uffizi director Eike Schmidt summoned a great deal of enthusiasm for the piece at an event unveiling the unlikely acquisition.

Praising the work as “an original fusion between punk and pop” that brings self portraiture into the realm of Conceptual art, Schmidt claimed that branching out to the world of street art was in the tradition of the Medici who first built the museum’s collection. “The Medici, always at the cutting edge, would be happy to see Endless’s work enter the collection,” he claimed in a statement.

The museum is billing the acquisition as its first work of street art, but it’s clearly a work on canvas, created in a studio environment—not on the city streets. The mixed-media piece features two vertically stacked printings of a Noel Shelley photograph of Endless posed between British artist duo Gilbert and George, surrounded by their names in graffiti lettering.

British street artist Endless has donated this work featuring Gilbert and George and his Crotch Grab artwork appropriating Mark Wahlberg's Calvin Klein ad to the Uffizi in Florence. Photo courtesy of Uffizi Galleries

British street artist Endless has donated this work featuring Gilbert and George and his Crotch Grab artwork appropriating Mark Wahlberg’s Calvin Klein ad to the Uffizi in Florence. Photo courtesy of Uffizi Galleries.

In a nod to the tradition of the anonymous street artist, Endless’s face is partially hidden behind an open magazine featuring Crotch Grab, a recurring image in the artist’s work. Based on a famous Calvin Klein underwear ad featuring actor Mark Wahlberg, Crotch Grab originally appeared on the streets of London and was later appropriated by Gilbert and George.

“Endless elaborates on his symbolic explorations, moving between the brush and spray paint, luxury and pop, and creating a mirror of two different perfections, one wise and tragic, lived on the cutting edge of heresy and madness/folly, the other scientific, experimental, expanded upon analytically,” art critic Pasquale Lettieri pronounced at the work’s unveiling.

High praise, if a bit overwrought. But although the work was allegedly created specifically for the Uffizi, nothing about the subject matter nor the techniques involved in its making would seem to make any reference to the storied Florentine institution that would explain its sudden addition to the collection.

“The gallery director, Eike Schmidt, wanted to collect contemporary works and open a new portrait section to the Uffizi Gallery,” Endless told Midnight Publishing Group News in an email, noting that the gift had been in the works for several years. “He had requested my work to be in this collection.”

British street artist Endless with the work he gifted to the Uffizi in Florence. Photo courtesy of Uffizi Galleries.

British street artist Endless with the work he gifted to the Uffizi in Florence. Photo courtesy of Uffizi Galleries.

The Uffizi’s collection stops in the 1930s with Modern art—a portion of the collection relegated to upstairs galleries in the museum’s Pitti Palace location on the other side of the river. Branching out to more contemporary work isn’t necessarily a bad thing, even if an artist like Endless seems like a very strange place to start.

“I was surprised as the collection is most famous for its Renaissance works,” Endless admitted. “I am very honored to have my work feature amongst such a significant collection.”

Endless’s website claims that “the public buzz around his work has snowballed, to a point where now iconic brands, celebrities and the art world all know his name.” But his CV appears to be almost entirely London gallery shows. HIs other big project right now is painting a mural at an Italian ski resort for the 2021 Alpine Ski World Championships.

The Uffizi previously waded into the waters of contemporary art with “Flora Commedia,” a 2018 Cai Guo-Qiang exhibition, that was part of a series of shows by the Chinese artist responding to the collections of major international institutions.

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Street Artist Swoon on Collaborating With Alicia Keys for a New Portrait and Music Ad


Street artist Caledonia Curry, better known as Swoon, is famous for her massive block prints, which she’s pasted in cities around the world. But she’s recently shifted gears to focus on the mediums of filmmaking and painting—and it was a collaboration with musician Alicia Keys, who celebrates her 40th birthday today, that helped unlock this new avenue in Swoon’s career.

“I’ve always wanted to paint a portrait of Alicia,” Swoon told Midnight Publishing Group News. The artist met Keys and her husband, music producer Swizz Beatz, on the occasion of her 2014 exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum. The couple soon became avid collectors of Swoon’s work.

Last year, Keys approached Swoon about working together on the Amazon music ad for her new single “Underdog.”

By suggesting the collaboration, “Alicia was actually being a little bit of a disruptor on the ad campaign,” Swoon said. Fortunately, the marketing team liked the idea and agreed to feature Keys’s song against a backdrop of Swoon’s prints, specially animated for the occasion.

The artist took advantage of the opportunity to suggest she paint a portrait of Keys as well, with Amazon offering 100 prints of the image in a giveaway.

The result was the first full-scale painting—approximately eight by ten feet—Swoon had made since she was a teenager.

“I had been playing around with some really small portraits, just kind of feeling my way back into painting again,” Swoon said. “I was like, let me just let me just create a major work and try to bring in my entire language, but with painting.”

The change proved fortuitous for the artist, who went on create a new series of paintings for PBS’s “American Portrait” project, which also involves a mobile art component debuting in Brooklyn Bridge Park this weekend.

Swoon with her portrait of Alicia Keys. Photo by Zahra Sherzad.

Swoon with her portrait of Alicia Keys. Photo by Zahra Sherzad.

“At first I was evolving by adding to my plate. And then I got to the point where I realized I need to take some of my most precious, most favorite things and set them down if I’m going to open up new chambers of my creativity,” Swoon said. “I had to stop doing block printing, stop doing street posts and like lay that whole practice down so that I could make room for filmmaking—I’m working on a feature film—and painting.”

Such moments of reinvention are always pressure filled, and Swoon had the added challenge of painting such a famous face. “When you’re making a portrait of someone who’s so well known, it’s a very unforgiving space to be working in, because everybody knows when you fuck up,” she said. “It’s a high-stakes portrait.”

Swoon's portrait of Alicia Keys. Photo by Zahra Sherzad.

Swoon’s portrait of Alicia Keys. Photo by Zahra Sherzad.

Swoon unveiled the portrait to Keys in a recently released video. “That’s crazy,” Keys exclaims. “This is so beautiful!”

To capture her subject, Swoon focused on immortalizing Keys’s powerful feminine spirit—in much the same way she has done for other, less-recognizable figures.

“It’s Alicia—she’s this creative force,” Swoon said. “She’s very much in the line of portraits of people realizing themselves, unfurling into themselves.”

See more photos of the portrait in process below.

Swoon photographing Alicia Keys. Photo by ZRoman Rivas.

Swoon photographing Alicia Keys. Photo by ZRoman Rivas.

Swoon photographing Alicia Keys. Photo by ZRoman Rivas.

Swoon working on her portrait of Alicia Keys. Photo by Zahra Sherzad.

Swoon working on her portrait of Alicia Keys. Photo by Zahra Sherzad.

Swoon working on her portrait of Alicia Keys. Photo by Zahra Sherzad.

Swoon working on her portrait of Alicia Keys. Photo by Zahra Sherzad.

Swoon working on her portrait of Alicia Keys. Photo by Zahra Sherzad.

Swoon working on her portrait of Alicia Keys. Photo by Zahra Sherzad.

Swoon working on her portrait of Alicia Keys. Photo by Zahra Sherzad.

Swoon working on her portrait of Alicia Keys. Photo by Zahra Sherzad.

Swoon: The House Our Families Built” is on view in sites across New York City, January 30–February 21, 2021. 

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Street Artists Around the World Captured a Turbulent Year in Real Time—See the Beautiful and Unforgettable Works of 2020 Here


For much of the year, the best—and safest—place to see art was on the street. And perhaps more than in any other year, street art offered a real-time distillation of the events shaping our lives.

Across the globe, artwork speaking to the strangeness of the current moment proliferated on empty walls and billboards, immortalizing the need for face masks and social distancing, as well as the sacrifices of essential workers.

Then, as spring gave way to summer, US stores boarded up in response to a wave of Black Lives Matter protests. Artists turned plywood barriers into canvases, creating works that spoke to cries for racial justice.

Street art of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X made in reference to the George Floyd killing at the famous Leake Street Tunnel under Waterloo station. Photo by Keith Mayhew/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images.

Street art of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X made in reference to the George Floyd killing at the famous Leake Street Tunnel under Waterloo station. Photo by Keith Mayhew/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images.

Local artists transformed the area around Cup Foods in Minneapolis, the site where George Floyd was killed at the hands of police officers, into a mural-covered memorial. (One particular portrait of Floyd painted by Xena Goldman, Cadex Herrera, and Greta McClain became a national symbol and was displayed at his funeral—while controversy surrounding the lack of involvement of Black artists reflected larger concerns about who is centered in the art of the racial justice movement.)

Around the world, there were tributes to Kobe Bryant and Chadwick Boseman, to doctors and nurses, and to victims of police violence, as well as messages of hope, strength, and resilience in the face of the global health crisis and ensuing economic downturn.

This art was a reminder that even in times of isolation, none of us is alone. Here are some of the most memorable street artworks of the year—some inspirational and uplifting, some sorrowful, some humorous, some just plain beautiful—from countries around the world.

Luis Villanueva lights a candle in front of a Kobe Bryant mural by Jonas Never in downtown Los Angeles on January 26, 2020. Nine people were killed in the helicopter crash which claimed the life of NBA star Kobe Bryant and his 13-year-old daughter, Gianna Bryant. Photo by Apu Gomes/AFP/Getty Images.

Luis Villanueva lights a candle in front of a Kobe Bryant mural by Jonas Never in downtown Los Angeles on January 26, 2020. Photo by Apu Gomes/AFP/Getty Images.

Street art memorializing George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Trayvon Martin, and Ahmaud Arbery. Photo courtesy by Parmvir Bahia.

Street art memorializing George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Trayvon Martin, and Ahmaud Arbery. Photo courtesy by Parmvir Bahia.

A woman wearing a mask walks past street art of hearts that reads, "Hope" on December 10, 2020 in New York City. Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images.

A woman wearing a mask walks past street art of hearts that reads, “Hope” on December 10, 2020 in New York City. Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images.

Banksy's or Itcher's recent mural in Nottingham. Courtesy of Banksy.

Banksy’s or Itcher’s recent mural in Nottingham. Courtesy of Banksy.

A person photographs a mural created by British artist Banksy entitled "Aachoo!!" showing a woman wearing a headscarf sneezing and dropping their handbag and cane, in Bristol. (Photo by Geoff Caddick/AFP via Getty Images.)

A person photographs a mural created by British artist Banksy entitled “Aachoo!!” showing a woman wearing a headscarf sneezing and dropping their handbag and cane, in Bristol. Photo by Geoff Caddick/AFP via Getty Images.

Coronavirus street art by Gnasher. Photo courtesy of the artist on Facebook.

Coronavirus street art by Gnasher. Photo courtesy of the artist on Facebook.

A newly married couple poses with Pøbel's <em>Lovers</em>, painted on March 10, 2020, in Bryne, Norway. Photo by Jone K Øverland-JKOPhotography.

A newly married couple poses with Pøbel’s Lovers, painted on March 10, 2020, in Bryne, Norway. Photo by Jone K Øverland-JKOPhotography.

A man rides next to the painting 'I Want You To Stay Home' by artist TV Boy in Barcelona, Spain. (Photo by Xavi Torrent/Getty Images)

A man rides next to the painting ‘I Want You To Stay Home’ by artist TV Boy in Barcelona, Spain. Photo by Xavi Torrent/Getty Images.

Irish artist Emmalene Blake working on her latest mural, located in Dublin's city center, in response to legislation outlawing so-called "revenge porn," which is sexual abuse based on images, and which is still not a crime in Ireland. Photo by Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

Irish artist Emmalene Blake working on her latest mural, located in Dublin’s city center, in response to legislation outlawing so-called “revenge porn,” which is sexual abuse based on images, and which is still not a crime in Ireland. Photo by Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

A new artwork by street artist TVBoy depicting US President Donald Trump dressed up in a Superman costume and flying through COVID-19 clouds is pictured in a street in Barcelona on October 8, 2020. Photo by Pau Barrena/AFP via Getty Images.

A new artwork by street artist TVBoy depicting US President Donald Trump dressed up in a Superman costume and flying through COVID-19 clouds is pictured in a street in Barcelona on October 8, 2020. Photo by Pau Barrena/AFP via Getty Images.

Palestinians, wearing protective face masks,walk past street art showing a COVID-19 virus, in Gaza city on October 5, 2020. Photo by Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

Palestinians, wearing protective face masks,walk past street art showing a COVID-19 virus, in Gaza city on October 5, 2020. Photo by Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

An NYPD traffic officer walks past street art in SoHo as the city continues Phase 4 of re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on August 20, 2020 in New York City. Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images.

An NYPD traffic officer walks past street art in SoHo as the city continues Phase 4 of re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on August 20, 2020 in New York City. Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images.

FAKE, Super Nurse on April 21, 2020 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Photo by Paulo Amorim/VW PICS/Universal Images Group via Getty Images.

FAKE, Super Nurse on April 21, 2020 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Photo by Paulo Amorim/VW PICS/Universal Images Group via Getty Images.

A woman walks past a piece of street art depicting an NHS worker on April 21, 2020 in the Shoreditch area of London, England. Photo by Andrew Redington/Getty Images.

A woman walks past a piece of street art depicting an NHS worker on April 21, 2020 in the Shoreditch area of London, England. Photo by Andrew Redington/Getty Images.

A mural painting by graffiti artist Eme Freethinker features likenesses of US President Donald Trump and Chinese premier Xi Jinping wearing face covers, in Berlin on April 28, 2020. Photo by John MacDougall/AFP via Getty Images.

A mural painting by graffiti artist Eme Freethinker features likenesses of US President Donald Trump and Chinese premier Xi Jinping wearing face covers, in Berlin on April 28, 2020. Photo by John MacDougall/AFP via Getty Images.

A man walks his dogs past a public art installation aimed at turning boarded up shopfronts into works of art in Los Angeles, California on April 28, 2020. The initiative was launched by street artist Jeremy Novy and Art Share LA, including work seen here by @_ShowzArt_. Photo by Frederic J. Brown/AFP, via Getty Images.

A man walks his dogs past a public art installation aimed at turning boarded up shopfronts into works of art in Los Angeles, California on April 28, 2020. The initiative was launched by street artist Jeremy Novy and Art Share LA, including work seen here by @_ShowzArt_. Photo by Frederic J. Brown/AFP, via Getty Images.

Hannah McGee takes a selfie beside a piece of art by the artist Rebel Bear after it appeared on a wall on Ashton Lane in Glasgow. Photo by Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images.

Hannah McGee takes a selfie beside a piece of art by the artist Rebel Bear after it appeared on a wall on Ashton Lane in Glasgow. Photo by Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images.

Virus face mask street art and graffiti on Brick Lane in Shoreditch as lockdown continues and people observe the stay at home message in the capital on May 12, 2020, in London. Photo by Mike Kemp/In PIctures via Getty Images.

Virus face mask street art and graffiti on Brick Lane in Shoreditch as lockdown continues and people observe the stay at home message in the capital on May 12, 2020, in London. Photo by Mike Kemp/In PIctures via Getty Images.

A woman walks past street art supporting the NHS, near to the Ulster Hospital in Dundonald, Belfast. Photo by Niall Carson/PA Images via Getty Images.

A woman walks past street art supporting the NHS, near to the Ulster Hospital in Dundonald, Belfast. Photo by Niall Carson/PA Images via Getty Images.

A coronavirus-inspired street art piece by Adrian Wilson, paired with work by Jilly Ballistic. Photo by Adrian Wilson.

A coronavirus-inspired street art piece by Adrian Wilson, paired with work by Jilly Ballistic. Photo by Adrian Wilson.

A street art piece by Sara Erenthal. Photo by Sara Erenthal.

A street art piece by Sara Erenthal. Photo by Sara Erenthal.

A man carrying a sack on his head walks past a graffiti of coronavirus warrior in Mumbai. Photo by Ashish Vaishnav/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images.

A man carrying a sack on his head walks past a graffiti of coronavirus warrior in Mumbai. Photo by Ashish Vaishnav/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images.

A girl walks out of a building decorated with educational graffiti about safety measures and COVID-19 on July 6, 2020 in Nairobi, Kenya. Photo by Alissa Everett/Getty Images.

A girl walks out of a building decorated with educational graffiti about safety measures and COVID-19 on July 6, 2020 in Nairobi, Kenya. Photo by Alissa Everett/Getty Images.

Street art by Sara Erenthal on display on a wall on June 21, 2020 in Brooklyn . Photo by Gotham/Getty Images.

Street art by Sara Erenthal on display on a wall on June 21, 2020 in Brooklyn. Photo by Gotham/Getty Images.

Street art featuring the character Bart Simpson is on display on a boarded-up building in SoHo on June 21, 2020 in New York City. Photo by Gotham/Getty Images.

Street art featuring the character Bart Simpson is on display on a boarded-up building in SoHo on June 21, 2020 in New York City. Photo by Gotham/Getty Images.

A person walks past a street mural by artist Lexi Bella on June 16, 2020 in Brooklyn. Photo by Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images.

A person walks past a street mural by artist Lexi Bella on June 16, 2020 in Brooklyn. Photo by Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images.

Street art adorning a public wall depicting and honoring front line corona warriors which includes, health care workers, police personnel, journalists, and sanitary workers on July 11, 2020 on the wall of municipal compactor in New Delhi, India. Photo by Pallava Bagla/Corbis via Getty Images.

Street art adorning a public wall depicting and honoring front line corona warriors which includes, health care workers, police personnel, journalists, and sanitary workers on July 11, 2020 on the wall of municipal compactor in New Delhi, India. Photo by Pallava Bagla/Corbis via Getty Images.

An urban artist painted a mural under a bridge to honor health workers who have given their lives to curb COVID-19 in Mexico City. Photo by Leonardo Casas/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Studios/Future Publishing via Getty Images.

An urban artist painted a mural under a bridge to honor health workers who have given their lives to curb COVID-19 in Mexico City. Photo by Leonardo Casas/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Studios/Future Publishing via Getty Images.

A portrait of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo painted with a face mask as a way to demonstrate the situation that is lived due to the new coronavirus pandemic on August 5, 2020 in Mexico City. Photo by Leonardo Casas/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Studios/Future Publishing via Getty Images.

A portrait of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo painted with a face mask as a way to demonstrate the situation that is lived due to the new coronavirus pandemic on August 5, 2020 in Mexico City. Photo by Leonardo Casas/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Studios/Future Publishing via Getty Images.

A couple wearing masks holds hands while walking past street art on August 7, 2020 in New York City. Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images.

A couple wearing masks holds hands while walking past street art on August 7, 2020 in New York City. Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images.

A person walks past a large "Thank you" mural in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, on August 17, 2020. Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images.

A person walks past a large “Thank you” mural in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, on August 17, 2020. Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images.

Street art of a medical worker with wings wearing protective mask to illustrate the Coronavirus (COVID-19 ) pandemic in Mexico City. Photo by Ricardo Castelan Cruz/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Studios/Future Publishing via Getty Images.

Street art of a medical worker with wings wearing protective mask to illustrate the Coronavirus (COVID-19 ) pandemic in Mexico City. Photo by Ricardo Castelan Cruz/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Studios/Future Publishing via Getty Images.

Street art by Rebel Bear on a wall on Bank Street in Glasgow. Photo by Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images.

Street art by Rebel Bear on a wall on Bank Street in Glasgow. Photo by Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images.

Nikkolas Smith, King Chad a mural memorializing Chadwick Boseman, in Downtown Disney. Photo courtesy of Walt Disney Imagineering.

Nina Chanel Abney, Black Lives Matter mural on the Bentonville Razorback greenway trail. Photo courtesy of Justkids.

Nina Chanel Abney, Black Lives Matter mural on the Bentonville Razorback greenway trail in Arkansas. Photo courtesy of Justkids.

Polish street artist NeSpoon's lace mural on a wall of La Cite de la Dentelle et de La Mode on September 20, 2020 in Calais, France. Photo by Sylvain Lefevre/Getty Images.

Polish street artist NeSpoon’s lace mural on a wall of La Cite de la Dentelle et de La Mode on September 20, 2020 in Calais, France. Photo by Sylvain Lefevre/Getty Images.

Pedestrians walk past a poster designed and displayed overnight by Italian street artist Mauro Pallotta, aka Maupal, on October 1, 2020 in the Borgo Pio district of Rome near the Vatican, inspired by an icon of St. Stephen, representing the Saint holding a hypodermic syringe of vaccine and reading in Latin "Sacred Vaccine". Photo by Tiziana Fabi/AFP via Getty Images.

Pedestrians walk past a poster designed and displayed overnight by Italian street artist Mauro Pallotta, aka Maupal, on October 1, 2020 in the Borgo Pio district of Rome near the Vatican, inspired by an icon of St. Stephen, representing the Saint holding a hypodermic syringe of vaccine and reading in Latin “Sacred Vaccine”. Photo by Tiziana Fabi/AFP via Getty Images.

A person walks past street art by artist Pure Genius on October 2, 2020 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Photo by Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images.

A person walks past street art by artist Pure Genius on October 2, 2020 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Photo by Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images.

A woman walks by the mural 50 FT HEROES by the Irish artist Shane Sutton, located in Dublin. Photo by Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

A woman walks by the mural 50 FT HEROES by the Irish artist Shane Sutton, located in Dublin. Photo by Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

Kurt Boone has photographed plywood barriers covered in graffiti during the George Floyd protests in New York. Photo by Kurt Boone.

Kurt Boone has photographed plywood barriers covered in graffiti during the George Floyd protests in New York. Photo by Kurt Boone.

A pedestrian wearing a face mask or covering due to the COVID-19 pandemic, walks past COVID-19 street art, advising to "Stay Alert" and "Save Lives" in central London, on November 22, 2020. Photo by Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images.

A pedestrian wearing a face mask or covering due to the COVID-19 pandemic, walks past COVID-19 street art, advising to “Stay Alert” and “Save Lives” in central London, on November 22, 2020. Photo by Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images.

A man wearing a mask walks past a new mural by Elle Street Art of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (RBG) commissioned by the Lisa Project on November 17, 2020 in New York City. Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images.

A man wearing a mask walks past a new mural by Elle Street Art of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (RBG) commissioned by the Lisa Project on November 17, 2020 in New York City. Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images.

Tribute mural to Little Rock Nine by Maeve Cahill, part of FIT’s Black Student Union's public art exhibition "#ChalkThatTalk" held in June in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. Photo courtesy of FIT.

Tribute mural to the Little Rock Nine by Maeve Cahill, part of FIT’s Black Student Union’s public art exhibition “#ChalkThatTalk” held in June in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. Photo courtesy of FIT.

A mural of the Police, by the Irish artist Emmalene Blake, located in South Dublin. This is the latest work in her "Stay at Home" series encouraging people to stick to social distancing. Photo by Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

A mural of the Police, by the Irish artist Emmalene Blake, located in South Dublin. This is the latest work in her “Stay at Home” series encouraging people to stick to social distancing. Photo by Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

Street artist SF paints a mural on a wall in Athens, inspired by the second lockdown in Greece due to the COVID-19 pandemic, in Athens on November 25, 2020. Photo by ARIS MESSINIS/AFP via Getty Images.

Street artist SF paints a mural on a wall in Athens, inspired by the second lockdown in Greece due to the COVID-19 pandemic, in Athens on November 25, 2020. Photo by ARIS MESSINIS/AFP via Getty Images.

A Palestinian man walks past street art showing doctors mask-clad due to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic in the Nusseirat refugee camp in the central Gaza Strip on November 16, 2020. Photo by Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images.

A Palestinian man walks past street art showing doctors mask-clad due to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic in the Nusseirat refugee camp in the central Gaza Strip on November 16, 2020. Photo by Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images.

Berlin artist S. G. Raum works on a mural featuring the words: "Without art and culture it gets quiet..." on a segment of the Berlin wall in Berlin's Mauerpark on November 15, 2020. Photo by John MacDougall/AFP via Getty Images.

Berlin artist S. G. Raum works on a mural featuring the words: “Without art and culture it gets quiet…” on a segment of the Berlin wall in Berlin’s Mauerpark on November 15, 2020. Photo by John MacDougall/AFP via Getty Images.

Palestinian women walk past street art showing doctors mask-clad due to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, in Khan Yunis in the southern Gaza Strip, on November 12, 2020. Photo by Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images.

Palestinian women walk past street art showing doctors mask-clad due to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, in Khan Yunis in the southern Gaza Strip, on November 12, 2020. Photo by Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images.

A woman wearing a mask walks past a coronavirus hearts mural by artist Timur York on the Museum of Ice Cream in SoHo on November 10, 2020 in New York City. Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images.

A woman wearing a mask walks past a coronavirus hearts mural by artist Timur York on the Museum of Ice Cream in SoHo on November 10, 2020 in New York City. Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images.

Street art depicting Boris Johnson which reads "The Eton Mess" is seen at the Bay Horse Tavern in Manchester's Northern Quarter on November 09, 2020. Photo by Charlotte Tattersall/Getty Images.

Street art depicting Boris Johnson which reads “The Eton Mess” is seen at the Bay Horse Tavern in Manchester’s Northern Quarter on November 09, 2020. Photo by Charlotte Tattersall/Getty Images.

Urban artist Roberto Islas's Day of the Dead mural in memory of the victims who have lost their lives to the COVID-19 disease on October 30, 2020 in Mexico City, Mexico. Photo by Carlos Tischler/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Studios/Future Publishing via Getty Images.

Urban artist Roberto Islas’s Day of the Dead mural in memory of the victims who have lost their lives to the COVID-19 disease on October 30, 2020 in Mexico City, Mexico. Photo by Carlos Tischler/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Studios/Future Publishing via Getty Images.

Konstance Patton painted this mural for a project by the Soho Renaissance Factory at the New York Public Library's new Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library branch on 5th Avenue while it was boarded up ahead of the presidential election in November. Photo by Kurt Boone.

Konstance Patton painted this mural for a project by the Soho Renaissance Factory at the New York Public Library’s new Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library branch on 5th Avenue while it was boarded up ahead of the presidential election in November. Photo by Kurt Boone.

A coronavirus themed street art piece by Sean "Hula" Yoro in Miami. Photo courtesy of Kapu Collective.

A coronavirus themed street art piece by Sean “Hula” Yoro in Miami. Photo courtesy of Kapu Collective.

A Simpsons inspired work by Italian artist Nello Petruccii. Courtesy of the artist.

Coronavirus street art in Los Angeles by Teachr1 with Malith Devaka, Chris Braas, Louis James Williams, Gregory Karpov, Hiske Hilgenga, Cristian Ciprian Brauen Droz, Daniel Duarte Ontiveros, Jamy Zord and Kirk A J Zimmerman. Photo courtesy of the artists.

Coronavirus street art in Los Angeles by Teachr1 with Malith Devaka, Chris Braas, Louis James Williams, Gregory Karpov, Hiske Hilgenga, Cristian Ciprian Brauen Droz, Daniel Duarte Ontiveros, Jamy Zord and Kirk A J Zimmerman. Photo courtesy of the artists.

Street art in Berlin featuring the Lord of the Rings character Gollum holding a roll of toilet paper, a shopping item hoarded by consumers during the coronavirus pandemic crisis. Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images.

Street art in Berlin featuring the Lord of the Rings character Gollum holding a roll of toilet paper, a shopping item hoarded by consumers during the coronavirus pandemic crisis. Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images.

A man wears a protective mask walks passes by a coronavirus (COVID-19) mural at Tomang in Jakarta, Indonesia on December 18, 2020. Photo by Anton Raharjo/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images.

A man wears a protective mask walks passes by a coronavirus (COVID-19) mural at Tomang in Jakarta, Indonesia on December 18, 2020. Photo by Anton Raharjo/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images.

People wearing masks walk past Donald Trump street art that reads, "playtime is over Donny" by Pure Genius on November 29, 2020 in New York City. Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images.

People wearing masks walk past Donald Trump street art that reads, “playtime is over Donny” by Pure Genius on November 29, 2020 in New York City. Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images.

NYC Health street art thanking MTA cleaning crews in Harlem. Photo by Sarah Cascone.

NYC Health street art thanking MTA cleaning crews in Harlem. Photo by Sarah Cascone.

Street art on a boarded up storefront in Harlem. Photo by Sarah Cascone.

Street art on a boarded up storefront in Harlem. Photo by Sarah Cascone.

Street art by Black Rose in Harlem. Photo by Sarah Cascone.

Street art by Black Rose in Harlem. Photo by Sarah Cascone.

Street art by Dister Rondon in Washington Heights. Photo by Sarah Cascone.

Street art by Dister Rondon in Washington Heights. Photo by Sarah Cascone.

A large black and white mural of George Floyd's face stands tall on the sidewalk outside of Cup Foods near where Floyd was killed on Sunday, July 26, 2020 in Minneapolis. Photo by Jason Armond/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images.

A large black and white mural of George Floyd’s face stands tall on the sidewalk outside of Cup Foods near where Floyd was killed on Sunday, July 26, 2020 in Minneapolis. Photo by Jason Armond/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images.

A pedestrian walks past MandiMixUps' coronavirus street art "Covid Collection," reimaginging historic artworks <em>The Scream</em>, <em>American Gothic</em>, and <em>Girl With a Pearl Earring</em> wearing masks, in Glasgow on September 2, 2020 after the Scottish government imposed fresh restrictions on the city after an rise in cases of the novel coronavirus. Photo by Andy Buchanan/AFP via Getty Images.

A pedestrian walks past MandiMixUps’ coronavirus street art “Covid Collection,” reimaginging historic artworks The Scream, American Gothic, and Girl With a Pearl Earring wearing masks, in Glasgow on September 2, 2020 after the Scottish government imposed fresh restrictions on the city after an rise in cases of the novel coronavirus. Photo by Andy Buchanan/AFP via Getty Images.

Street art in Manchester as England continues a four week national lockdown to curb the spread of coronavirus. Photo by Martin Rickett/PA Images via Getty Images.

Street art in Manchester as England continues a four week national lockdown to curb the spread of coronavirus. Photo by Martin Rickett/PA Images via Getty Images.

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