New Museum

Here Are the 14 U.S. Museum Shows That Matter This Fall, From a Survey of 21st-Century Feminisms in Berkeley to a Radical Art Rediscovery in Atlanta


As museums begin to reopen in the United States, we cast an eye over upcoming exhibitions for those that promise the most urgent and notable art of our time. The resulting list contains a diverse roster of 14 shows—by solo practitioners and groups chosen by keen-eyed curators—coming to museums from coast to coast.

Some exhibitions will introduce you to artists you may not know, like Bani Abidi at the MCA Chicago, Michaela Eichwald at the Walker Art Center, and Nellie Mae Rowe at the High Museum. Others will offer new insight into artists or eras of artistic production you thought you knew, from a spotlight on Georgia O’Keeffe’s photography in Houston to a sweeping feminist art survey in Berkeley. 

Regardless of what city you’re in, this fall’s season of museum programming is bound to open both eyes and minds.

 

New Time: Art and Feminisms in the 21st Century
Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
August 28, 2021–January 30, 2022

Farah Al Qasimi, It’s Not Easy Being Seen 3 (2016). Courtesy the artist; The Third Line, Dubai; and Helena Anrather.

With 140 works by 76 artists and collectives, this exhibition at the U.C. Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive is one of the largest to date on contemporary feminist art, and will coincide with a year of public programming focused on feminist theory. Works by the likes of Laura Aguilar, Christina Quarles, Zanele Muholi, Wu Tsang, and Francesca Woodman are included, tackling such topics as the fragmented body, domesticity, female anger, and feminist utopias. 

 

Raúl de Nieves: The Treasure House of Memory
Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston
September 1, 2021–July 24, 2022

Raúl de Nieves, The Fable, which is composed of wonders, moves the more (2021). © Raúl de Nieves.

Multidisciplinary artist Raúl de Nieves is adored for his exuberant works that blend queer club culture, religious iconography, and folklore traditions from his native Mexico. Here, the artist continues his ongoing exploration of his culture and its traditions through a new body of work, created especially for the ICA, that looks at memory and personal transformation.

Really Free: The Radical Art of Nellie Mae Rowe
High Museum of Art, Atlanta
September 3, 2021–January 9, 2022 

Nellie Mae Rowe, This World is Not My Home (1979). Photo courtesy of the High Museum of Art, Atlanta.

Born in Georgia in 1900, the daughter of a formerly enslaved man, Rowe achieved fame as a self-taught folk artist. The first major exhibition devoted to Rowe in more than 20 years celebrates the late artist’s notable drawing career, which was only fostered later in her life, after the deaths of her husband and employer, in the 1960s. The museum bills the show as the first to position Rowe’s creative pursuit as a “radical act of self-expression and liberation in the post-civil rights-era South.”

 

Joan Mitchell
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
September 4, 2021–January 17, 2022

Joan Mitchell, Untitled (1992). Courtesy of Cheim & Read, New York.

This highly anticipated retrospective devoted to the queen of gestural abstraction contains over 80 works, encompassing everything from early paintings and drawings, sketchbooks, letters, and photographs to the large, color-drenched, multi-panel works that defined her later output.  

 

Selena Forever/Siempre Selena
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas
September 4, 2021–January 10, 2022

John Dyer, Selena (1992). Courtesy of the artist.

At the height of the beloved Tejano singer’s fame, it was photographer John Dyer whom she entrusted to produce the images of her that were seared into the American pop-culture consciousness. Over the course of two collaborative photoshoots, in 1992 and ‘94, Dyer captured the legendary Selena Quintanilla-Pérez in her signature gemmed bustier and red lip, pictures that became immortal after her tragic death in 1995.

 

Bani Abidi: The Man Who Talked Until He Disappeared
Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago
September 4, 2021–June 5, 2022

Bani Abidi, An Unforeseen Situation 4. Courtesy of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.

Bani Abidi’s work infuses deadly serious subjects like militarism, nationalism, and memory with humor, holding up a mirror to power structures. The Pakistani artist, who lives in Karachi and Berlin, gets the survey treatment at the MCA, co-organized with the Sharjah Art Foundation, in a show that looks at over 20 years of her career and features new work alongside existing video, photography, and sound installations. 

 

Adam Pendleton: Who Is Queen?
Museum of Modern Art, New York
September 18, 2021–January 30, 2022

Adam Pendleton, Untitled (WE ARE NOT) (2021). Image courtesy of the artist.

Pendleton, who has put forth a “Black Dada” framework inspired by Amiri Baraka, ambitiously takes over MoMA’s Marron Atrium with an immersive floor-to-ceiling installation described as a “spatial collage” containing text, image, and sound. All together, the show’s paintings, drawings, textiles, sculptures, and moving images seek to disrupt the 1:1 relationship of words and images, allowing a complex new vision of Blackness to emerge in abstraction.

Barbara Kruger: THINKING OF YOU. I MEAN ME. I MEAN YOU.
The Art Institute of Chicago
September 19, 2021–January 24, 2022

Barbara Kruger’s Untitled (Your Body is a Battleground) (1989), at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 2013. Photo by Susan Broman via Flickr.

The prolific Pictures Generation artist has collaborated with the Art Institute to map out a survey of her entire career that takes up the whole of the museum’s 18,000-square-foot gallery space. It’s all here, and squirm-inducingly relevant: her trademark “pasteups,” works on vinyl, animations, and video installations, plus a new site-specific work in the adjoining atrium. On top of this, Kruger has created work for the city at large, making billboards and designs for the Chicago Transit Authority, among other organizations.

 

Naudline Pierre: What Could Be Has Not Yet Appeared
Dallas Museum of Art
September 26, 2021–May 15, 2022

Naudline Pierre, Lest You Fall (2019). Courtesy of the Dallas Museum of Art.

Pierre is known for her colorful canvases that depict ethereal beings and explore power struggles in intimate relationships. The Brooklyn-based painter’s first solo museum exhibition will consist of existing works—one of which was recently acquired by the DMA—as well as new creations, with five major paintings making their debut. 

 

Greater New York
MoMA PS1, New York
October 7, 2021–April 18, 2022

Robin Graubard, selection from “Peripheral Vision” (1979–2021). Image courtesy the artist and Office Baroque, Antwerp.

One of the hottest survey exhibitions of new art from across New York’s five boroughs is back for its fifth iteration. This latest edition, curated by Ruba Katrib with Serubiri Moses, Kate Fowle, and Inés Katzenstein, was delayed by a year due to the pandemic, but still promises to showcase the best of artists and collectives currently working in the Big Apple, including Carolyn Lazard, Alan Michelson, and BlackMass publishing.

Georgia O’Keeffe, Photographer
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
October 17, 2021–January 17, 2022

Georgia O’Keeffe, Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium) (1964–68). © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe.

The artist best known for her paintings of flowers and Southwestern landscapes is recast here in the first exhibition to focus entirely on her photography, with nearly 100 prints from a newly examined archive to go on view. Described as a “Modernist approach” to the art form, O’Keeffe’s pictures document family members, fellow artists, and her travels. 

 

Soft Water Hard Stone
The New Museum, New York
October 28, 2021–January 23, 2022

Amalie Smith, Clay Theory (2019) (still). Courtesy of the artist.

The latest triennial from the downtown institution draws its title from a Brazilian proverb: “Água mole em pedra dura, tanto bate até que fura,” meaning “soft water on hard stone hits until it bores a hole.” Curators Margot Norton and Jamillah James have translated this idea into an exhibition of 41 international artists focused on how systems we once considered infallible have been, in fact, proven fragile by recent global crises. 

 

My Barbarian
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
October 29, 2021–February 27, 2022

My Barbarian, Broke People’s Baroque Peoples’ Theater, 2011–15. Studio photograph, courtesy of the artists.

For the occasion of the performance trio’s 20th anniversary, the Whitney has commissioned a new filmic piece, Rose Bird, about California’s first female chief Supreme Court justice, to accompany this two-part survey of My Barbarian’s work. A series of live events—including a play, a festival, a cabaret-style concert, and a “rehearsal-as-performance”―will be enacted alongside an exhibition containing footage of previous performances, in addition to sculptures, paintings, drawings, masks, and puppets.

Michaela Eichwald
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis
November 14, 2020–May 16, 2021

Michaela Eichwald, Die Unsrigen sind fortgezogen (The Ours Have Moved Away) (2014). Collection Brian Pietsch and Christopher Hermann.

The Berlin-based artist and writer, who is primarily a painter, marks her first solo exhibition in the United States with a presentation looking back at the past ten years of her career. Her palimpsest-like paintings, sculptures, and collages contain surprising materials like candy and chicken bones, and often allude to her interests in philosophy and literature.

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11 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From a Talk With Jordan Casteel to Rashid Johnson at Storm King


Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. In light of the global health crisis, we are currently highlighting events in person and digitally, as well as in-person exhibitions open in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all EST unless otherwise noted.)

 

Monday, April 5

IV Castellanos. Photo by Nina Isabelle.

IV Castellanos. Photo by Nina Isabelle.

1. “Sexual Justice Symposium” at the New School, New York

As part of its 2021 Gender Matters Symposium,  the New School’s Gender & Sexualities Studies Institute is staging a panel on sex, power, and justice with an emphasis on intersectional art and activism. Speakers include artist Christen Clifford, writer Masha Tupitsyn, and curator Jasmine Wahi of the Bronx Museum of Art and Project for Empty Space in Newark. Artists IV Castellanos and Ayana Evans will also perform.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 6 p.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Monday, April 5–Saturday, April 10

2. “Meta vs. Crypto” 

In what seems like an inevitable development, this virtual event is pretty much an NFT art fair, with 30 galleries selling digital art—available for purchase in dollars and cryptocurrency—on the blockchain. Three separate virtual worlds have been built to present work by over 50 artists, with an opening party hosted by Bootsy Collins. Accompanying Clubhouse programming will include a Monday night talk with newly minted NFT legend Beeple, and a Tuesday conversation about crypto art history and the Rare Pepe NFT that made headlines at the first-ever major NFT auction back in 2018 with a then-record $39,000 sale. The event is also accompanied by an NFT debut on MakersPlace featuring street artists from the popular traveling exhibition “Beyond the Streets.”

Price: Free
Time: On view daily at all times

—Sarah Cascone

 

Tuesday, April 6

Jordan Casteel. Photo by David Schulze.

Jordan Casteel. Photo by David Schulze.

3. “Painting Portraits: A Conversation with Jordan Casteel” at the Morgan Library & Museum, New York

As part of the programming for “David Hockney: Drawing from Life” (through May 30), the Morgan presents a conversation about portraiture with Jordan Casteel—known for her stunning large-scale paintings of Black men and women, many of whom she encountered on the street—and Isabelle Dervaux, the museum’s curator of Modern and contemporary drawings.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, April 7

The conversation is part of the Bass's "Curator Culture" series.

The conversation is part of the Bass’s “Curator Culture” series.

4. “Recovering Black History” at the Bass, Miami Beach, and the Studio Museum, Harlem

Performer and Hamilton alumnus Leslie Odom, Jr., musician and author Questlove, and author and editor Jessica Harris will gather together to discuss how their work champions, recontextualizes, and preserves Black narratives. The conversation, which will be held on the Bass Museum’s YouTube Channel, is presented by the Bass and the Studio Museum in Harlem and moderated by the Bass’s own Tom Healy.

Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 6 p.m.

—Julia Halperin

 

Wednesday, April 7–Monday, November 8

Rashid Johnson, <em>The Crisis</em> (2019) installation view at Storm King Art Center, courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Stephanie Powell, courtesy of Storm King Art Center.

Rashid Johnson, The Crisis (2019) installation view at Storm King Art Center, courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Stephanie Powell, courtesy of Storm King Art Center.

5. “Rashid Johnson: The Crisis” at Storm King Art Center, New Windsor, New York

Beloved outdoor sculpture park Storm King opens for the season with Rashid Johnson’s site-specific installation of a 16-foot-tall, yellow pyramidal steel structure titled The Crisis amid a field of native grasses. “When I was making this work in 2019, there was so much talk about a ‘crisis at the border’—but now, in 2021, there is even more at stake,” the artist said in a statement. “The world has endured a year of struggle defined by the global pandemic, compounded by ongoing social unrest. My presentation at Storm King prompts us to reflect on how we move through our own daily lives as the world around us continues in crisis.”

Location: Storm King, 1 Museum Road, New Windsor, New York
Price:
 Per vehicle admission, starting with $20 for one person
Time: Spring hours Wednesday–Monday, 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, April 9

Tracey Robertson Carter, co-chair of Artist In-Residence in Everglades (AIRIE). Photo courtesy of Art Funders Forum.

Tracey Robertson Carter, co-chair of Artist In-Residence in Everglades (AIRIE). Photo courtesy of Art Funders Forum.

6. “Art x Climate Change” at the Art Funders Forum

For the latest event in its “Remake the Model” virtual conversation series, the Art Funder Forum is partnering with EXPO Chicago to answer one of the most pressing questions facing the art world: “How can cultural philanthropy help solve climate change?” Tracey Robertson Carter, co-chair of Artist In-Residence in Everglades (AIRIE), and Sarah Sutton of the Frankenthaler Climate Initiative will speak with Art Funders Forum founders Sean McManus and Melissa Cowley Wolf about how artists are increasing awareness of climate change and helping inspire philanthropists to invest money into fighting it.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 12 p.m. CDT

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday, May 1

Jotham Malavé Maldonado,
El loco (Visiones del Cerro), 2019. Courtesy of REGULAR•NORMAL.

7. “The Privilege of Getting Together” at Anna Zorina, New York

Anna Zorina Gallery is hosting part 2 of Regular Normal’s January group show, “The Privilege of Getting Together.” Curator Danny Baez has organized an amazing line-up of 15 artists, including Danielle de Jesus, Estelle Maisonett, Jotham Malavé Maldonado, and Miguel Payano. Each artist addresses themes of community and relationships in the age of Covid.

Location: Anna Zorina Gallery, 532 W 24th St, New York
Price:
 Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Cristina Cruz

 

Through Sunday, April 25

Daniel T. Gaitor-Lomack, Kings Blue (I’ll Be Seeing You), 2020. Courtesy of Alyssa Davis Gallery.

8. “Daniel T. Gaitor-Lomack: Domesticity Forgotten: The Art of Assemblage ” at Alyssa Davis Gallery, New York

Alyssa Davis Gallery has extended Daniel T. Gaitor-Lomack’s solo show, “Domesticity Forgotten: The Art of Assemblage,” through April 25. The show presents sculptural installations (which the artist calls “conceptual performance assemblages”) and photographs, some of the artist’s performances. You can see more of Gaitor-Lomack’s found-object sculptures at Lyles & King through May 2.

Location: Alyssa Davis Gallery, 2 Cornelia Street, New York
Price:
 Free
Time: By appointment

—Cristina Cruz

 

Saturday, May 8

Emily Marie Miller, Envy in the Wings (2021). Courtesy of Monya Rowe.

Emily Marie Miller, Envy in the Wings (2021). Courtesy of Monya Rowe.

9. “Emily Marie Miller: If I Cannot Bend the Gods Above, Then I Will Move the Infernal Regions” at Monya Rowe, New York

In new large-scale works, painter Emily Marie Miller depicts a fantastical, nighttime world filled only with women in theatrically staged scenarios engaging in various erotic entanglements. Partly inspired by Liz Greene’s 1996 book The Astrological Neptune and the Quest for Redemption, Miller reimagines the Neptunian archetype’s desire to return to a worldly paradise within these images of seeming abandon. The women that populate these scenes appear slightly blurred, as though hazily recalled in a dream, and it seems possible that just one protagonist appears multiplied again and again. Allusions to fairy tales and films reverberate—a reappearing pair of scarlet slippers bring to mind the 1948 technicolor film The Red Shoes, while the stage-like interior scenes call to mind choreographed ballets, particularly Giselle. Humming with dark blues and burning reds, the paintings are a kind of one-woman burlesque, performed primarily for oneself and to delightfully lurid effect. 

Location: Monya Rowe, 224 West 30th Street, #1005,  New York
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.– 6 p.m.

—Katie White

 

Through Sunday, May 16

Nicholas Galanin, <i>Never Forget</i>. North of the Palm Springs Visitors Center at Tramway Road. Courtesy Desert X.

Nicholas Galanin, Never Forget. North of the Palm Springs Visitors Center at Tramway Road. Courtesy Desert X.

10. “Desert X 2021” at various locations, Coachella Valley, California

The latest edition of this sprawling mega-show, which takes place in the great outdoors of the Coachella Valley in California, picks up where the latest editions left off. The show is organized by Desert X artistic director Neville Wakefield and co-curator César García-Alvarez and includes works by artists such as Nicholas Galanin, whose Hollywood-like sign reminds viewers about whose land it really is; Judy Chicago, whose fireworks offer a stunning and colorful display; and Alicja Kwade, whose powerful, sometimes difficult works combine industrial materials with biomorphic forms. Timed tickets can be reserved for those who are interested.

Location: Various locations, Coachella Valley, California
Price: Free
Time: Sunrise to sunset, Monday through Sunday

—Nan Stewert

 

Through Sunday, July 11

Lillian Bassman, A Report to Skeptics, Suzy Parker, April 1952, Harper’s Bazaar. Gelatin silver print. Collection of Eric and Lizzie Himmel, New York. © Estate of Lillian Bassman. Image via The Jewish Museum.

11. “Modern Look: Photography and the American Magazine” at the Jewish Museum, New  York

Dive into the world of the mid-century American magazine with the Jewish Museum’s latest show honoring the legacy of postwar avant-garde design. As artists and designers were forced out of Europe during the war, many of them landed in America, bringing with them an “unmistakable aesthetic” that marked the pages of magazines like Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue. Featuring photographs, layouts, covers, and more from the archives of designers and photographers like Richard Avedon, Lillian Bassman, Margaret Bourke-White, Gordon Parks, and Paul Rand, the show shapes up to be a print lover’s dream.

Location: The Jewish Museum, 1109 5th Ave, New York
Price: $18 for adults
Time: Monday 11 a.m.–4 p.m., Thursday 11 a.m–8 p.m., Friday–Sunday 11 a.m.–4 p.m.

—Katie Rothstein

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For Its Major Post-Pandemic Triennial, the New Museum Has Invited 40 Rising Artists to Explore the Theme of Persistence


The 2021 New Museum triennial—the fifth iteration of its signature exhibition of emerging artists—has been in the works since long before the pandemic. But its overarching theme, of tenacity in the face of hardship, will likely feel more relevant than ever when the show opens this fall, well over a year into the pandemic.

The museum announced today that the exhibition, co-organized by Margot Norton, a curator at the New Museum, and Jamillah James, senior curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, is titled “Soft Water Hard Stone.” The name comes from a Brazilian proverb: Água mole em pedra dura, tanto bate até que fura (“Soft water on hard stone hits until it bores a hole”).

For the curators, it’s a metaphor for persistence: Even the most inexorable of materials change with time and energy. 

The 40 artists included in the show—a group that represents five continents and nearly all media—the proverb can, occasionally, be read more literally. The transfiguration of discordant materials and ideas will constitute a prominent theme in the exhibition, as will the use of outmoded models and artistic traditions.

Their works exalt states of transformation, calling attention to the malleability of structures, porous and unstable surfaces, and the fluid and adaptable potential of both technological and organic media,” a statement on the triennial reads. 

Ambera Wellmann, <i>UnTurning</i> (2019). Courtesy of the artist and KTZ gallery, Berlin.

Ambera Wellmann, UnTurning (2019). Courtesy of the artist and KTZ gallery, Berlin.

Though all of the artists were born after 1975, the curators say they didn’t look to birth dates for their definition of “emerging artists.”

“We decided that, instead of age, our parameter would be based on exposure,” James tells Midnight Publishing Group News, “so that artists we invited that had not yet had a major solo exhibition in a U.S. museum.” 

Norton and James began research for the Triennial in the summer 2018, logging nearly two year’s worth of travel and in-person studio visits before the pandemic necessitated some improvisation. “When we scheduled our travel, we were interested in visiting locations where it made a difference to be there physically, and in areas where artists are often underrepresented in international exhibitions,” James says, pointing to places such as North Africa, South Asia, and Eastern Europe.

Since then, the curators have “become quite accustomed to the Zoom studio visit, to say the least.” Norton says. “While there is a huge disadvantage to not seeing work in person, we actually found it to be quite efficient to continue our research remotely, particularly as we honed in on the show’s theme, and for the artists whose works we have had the opportunity to see in person prior.” 

Brandon Ndife, <i>Modern Dilemma</i> (2020). Courtesy of the artist and Bureau, New York.

Brandon Ndife, Modern Dilemma (2020). Courtesy of the artist and Bureau, New York.

“Soft Water Hard Stone,” is set to run from October 27, 2021 to January 23, 2022 at the New Museum. See the full list of participating artists below.

  • Haig Aivazian (b. 1980 Beirut, Lebanon; lives and works in Beirut, Lebanon)
  • Evgeny Antufiev (b. 1986 Kyzyl, Russia; lives and works in Moscow, Russia)
  • Alex Ayed (b. 1989 Strasbourg, France; lives and works in Brussels, Belgium, and Tunis, Tunisia)
  • Nadia Belerique (b. 1982 Mississauga, Ontario, Canada; lives and works in Toronto, Canada)
  • Hera Büyüktaşcıyan (b. 1984 Istanbul, Turkey; lives and works in Istanbul, Turkey) 
  • Tomás Díaz Cedeño (b. 1983 Mexico City, Mexico; lives and works in Mexico City, Mexico) 
  • Gabriel Chaile (b. 1985 San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina; lives and works in Lisbon, Portugal)
  • Gaëlle Choisne (b. 1985 Cherbourg, France; lives and works in Paris, France)
  • Krista Clark (b. 1975 Burlington, VT, United States; lives and works in Atlanta, GA, United States) 
  • Kate Cooper (b. 1984, Liverpool, United Kingdom; lives and works in Amsterdam, the Netherlands) 
  • Cynthia Daignault (b. 1978 Baltimore, MD, United States; lives and works in Baltimore, MD, United States) 
  • Jes Fan (b. 1990 Toronto, Canada; lives and works in New York, NY, United States and Hong Kong)
  • Goutam Ghosh (b. 1979 Nabadwip, India; lives and works in Kolkata, India) 
  • Harry Gould Harvey IV (b. 1991 Fall River, MA, United States; lives and works in Fall River, MA, United States) 
  • Clara Ianni (b. 1987 São Paolo, Brazil; lives and works in São Paolo, Brazil)
  • Kahlil Robert Irving (b. 1992 San Diego, CA, United States; lives and works in St. Louis, MO, United States) 
  • Arturo Kameya (b. 1984 Lima, Peru; lives and works in Amsterdam, the Netherlands) 
  • Laurie Kang (b. 1985 Toronto, Canada; lives and works in Toronto, Canada)  
  • Bronwyn Katz (b. 1993 Kimberly, South Africa; lives and works in Cape Town, South Africa) 
  • Ann Greene Kelly (b. 1988 New York, NY, United States; lives and works in Los Angeles, CA, United States)
  • Kang Seung Lee (b. 1978 Seoul, South Korea; lives and works in Los Angeles, CA, United States) 
  • Amy Lien and Enzo Camacho (b. 1987 Dallas, TX, United States; lives and works in New York, NY, United States) and (b. 1985 Manila, Philippines; lives and works in Berlin, Germany) 
  • Tanya Lukin Linklater (Alutiiq) (b. 1976 Kodiak, AK, United States; lives and works in North Bay, Ontario, Canada)
  • Angelika Loderer (b. 1984 Feldbach, Austria; lives and works in Vienna, Austria)
  • Sandra Mujinga (b. 1989 Goma, Democratic Republic of the Congo; lives and works in Oslo, Norway and Berlin, Germany)
  • Gabriela Mureb (b. 1985 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; lives and works in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
  • Brandon Ndife (b. 1991 Hammond, IN, United States; lives and works in Brooklyn, NY, United States)
  • Erin Jane Nelson (b. 1989 Neenah, WI, United States; lives and works in Atlanta, GA, United States) 
  • Jeneen Frei Njootli (Vuntut Gwitchin) (b. 1988 Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada; lives and works in Vancouver, Canada)
  • Ima-Abasi Okon (b. 1981 London, United Kingdom; lives and works in London, United Kingdom and Amsterdam, the Netherlands)
  • Christina Pataialii (b. 1988 Auckland, New Zealand; lives and works in Wellington, New Zealand)
  • Thao Nguyen Phan (b. 1987 Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; lives and works in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam)
  • Nickola Pottinger (b. 1986 Kingston, Jamaica; lives and works in New York, NY, United States)
  • Rose Salane (b. 1992 New York, NY, United States; lives and works in New York, NY, United States)
  • Blair Saxon-Hill (b. 1979 Eugene, OR, United States; lives and works in Portland, OR, United States)
  • Samara Scott (b. 1984 London, United Kingdom; lives and works in London, United Kingdom)
  • Amalie Smith (b. 1985 Copenhagen, Denmark; lives and works in Copenhagen, Denmark)
  • Iris Touliatou (b. 1981 Athens, Greece; lives and works in Athens, Greece) 
  • Ambera Wellmann (b. 1982 Lunenberg, Nova Scotia, Canada; lives and works in New York, NY, United States)
  • Yu Ji (b. 1985 Shanghai, China; lives and works in Shanghai, China)

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11 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From Julie Mehretu at the Whitney to Alteronce Gumby in Two Boroughs


Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. In light of the global health crisis, we are currently highlighting events in person and digitally, as well as in-person exhibitions open in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all EST unless otherwise noted.)

 

Tuesday, March 23

"Women, Power & Promise: A Convening" at the Newark Museum of Art, featuring the Guerrilla Girls and Bobbi Brown.

“Women, Power & Promise: A Convening” at the Newark Museum of Art, featuring the Guerrilla Girls and Bobbi Brown.

1. “Women, Power, and Promise” at the Newark Museum of Art

The Newark Museum has put together a slate of programs for this Women’s History Month event, with a keynote address by cosmetics mogul Bobbi Brown, an art performance by the Guerrilla Girls, and closing remarks from Lisa Kaplowitz, executive director of the Center for Women in Business at Rutgers Business School.

Price: $50 general admission
Time: 3 p.m.–5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Dawoud Bey, <em>Taylor Falls and Deborah Hackworth</em> from “The Birmingham Project” (2012). Photo courtesy of the artist and Stephen Daiter Gallery.

Dawoud Bey, Taylor Falls and Deborah Hackworth from “The Birmingham Project” (2012). Photo courtesy of the artist and Stephen Daiter Gallery.

2. “Dawoud Bey in Conversation With Gary Carrion-Murayari” at the New Museum, New York

As part of a conversation series held in conjunction with the museum’s new exhibition, “Grief and Grievance: Art and Mourning in America” (through June 6), artist Dawoud Bey will speak with curator Gary Carrion-Murayari. His work in the show, The Birmingham Project (2012), memorializes the six young African Americans killed in the September 15, 1963, 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 4 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, March 24

Ronnie Goodman, <em>San Quentin Arts in Corrections Art Studio</em> (2008), detail. Collection of Prison Arts Project, William James Association.

Ronnie Goodman, San Quentin Arts in Corrections Art Studio (2008), detail. Collection of Prison Arts Project, William James Association.

3. “Honoring Ronnie Goodman” at MoMA PS1, Queens

As the museum winds down “Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration” (through April 5), MoMA PS1 pays tribute to Ronnie Goodman, who died last year. A self-taught artist, Goodman rediscovered his talents as a painter through the Arts in Corrections Program at San Quentin State Prison, making work that critiqued mass incarceration even after his release from jail. The virtual program will feature a new short film with rare footage of the artist and a talk by Nicole Fleetwood about his life and career.

Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 6:30 p.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, March 24–Saturday, May 1

Roxanne Jackson, <em>Black Flame</em> 2019). Photo courtesy of Dinner Gallery.

Roxanne Jackson, Black Flame 2019). Photo courtesy of Dinner Gallery.

4. “Magic Touch” at Dinner Gallery, New York

Jen Dwyer, who had an excellent showing of her feminist ceramic sculptures at Spring/Break New York just over a year ago, takes a turn as guest curator for this group show with an exciting line-up of artists including Faith Ringgold, Aminah Robinson, and Sophia Narrett, among others. The exhibition’s title is a reference to the handmade qualities of the works on view, inspired by the tactile experience of pushing and pulling clay in  Dwyer’s own practice, as well as the desire for physical connection after a year of isolation.

Location: Dinner Gallery, 242 West 22nd Street, New York
Price: Free
Time: By appointment

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, March 25

The passage of a cruise ship in the St. Mark’s Basin in Venice, Italy. (2014). Photo by: Delfino Sisto Legnani/World Monuments Fund Image courtesy Fondazione Venezia 2000

The passage of a cruise ship in the St. Mark’s Basin in Venice, Italy. Photo by: Delfino Sisto Legnani/World Monuments Fund Image courtesy Fondazione Venezia 2000

5. “When Will We Return to Venice and Should We?” Hosted by World Monuments Fund

When the pandemic brought tourism in Venice to a halt last year, it dealt a serious blow to the city’s economy but simultaneously provided a respite from the year-round throng of visitors and tourists. In this virtual discussion, WMF President and CEO Bénédicte de Montlaur will be joined by guest speakers Jane da Mosto (environmental scientist and founding president of We are here Venice) and visual artists Tomás Saraceno and David Landau to discuss these issues and others.

Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 12 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Thursday, March 25–Sunday, August 8

Julie Mehretu,<eM> Conjured Parts (eye). Ferguson, 2016</em>. Photo by Cathy Carver, courtesy of the Broad Art Foundation, Los Angeles, ©Julie Mehretu.

Julie Mehretu, Conjured Parts (eye). Ferguson, 2016. Photo by Cathy Carver, courtesy of the Broad Art Foundation, Los Angeles, ©Julie Mehretu.

6. “Julie Mehretu” at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

This mid-career survey of Julie Mehretu originated at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, which co-organized the show with the Whitney. It features some 30 paintings—some mammoth-sized—as well as works of paper, and showcases the artist’s ability to speak to such fraught issues as history, colonialism, capitalism, geopolitics, and war in largely abstract works.

Location: Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street
Price:
 $25 general admission
Time: Monday, 10:30 a.m.–5 p.m.; Thursday and Friday, 10:30 a.m.–6 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday 11:30 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Wednesday, March 31

Suejin Jo, <em>Prayer Rock<em> (2020). Photo courtesy of the New York Society of Women Artists.

Suejin Jo, Prayer Rock (2020). Photo courtesy of the New York Society of Women Artists.

7. “Women on the Edge of of Time” at Taller Boricua Gallery, New York

The New York Society of Women Artists, founded in 1925, is marking Women’s History Month with a virtual exhibition that considers its nearly century-long history, and the ways in which its founding concerns remain at the fore to this day. The 36 participating artists in this show also address pressing social issues such as immigration and LGTBQ rights. See the artworks and read the artist statements on the gallery’s virtual viewing room, and watch YouTube videos from each women about their work on the society’s website.

Price: Free
Time: On view daily at all times

—Nan Stewert

 

Through Sunday, April 11

Destiny Belgrave, Blooming Sprout, 2021 Courtesy of Deanna Evans Projects

8. “Destiny Belgrave: Birthright” at Deanna Evans Projects, Brooklyn

Deanna Evans Projects presents a solo show by Brooklyn-based artist Destiny Belgrave as its second exhibition. The show consists entirely of works on paper and highlights the importance of matriarchs in the artist’s life through paper cutouts, floral imagery, and poetry. The figures are women in Belgrave’s life, including her mother, sister, and herself and the show is a deeply personal exploration of the themes of youth, birth, and bonding.

Location: Deanna Evans Projects, 1329 Willoughby Avenue, #171 E, Brooklyn
Price:
 Free
Time: By appointment only

—Neha Jambhekar

 

 

Through Sunday, April 25 

Installation view "Somewhere Under the Rainbow / The Sky is Blue and What am I Glass am I" (2021). Courtesy of False Flag.

Installation view “Somewhere Under the Rainbow / The Sky is Blue and What am I Glass am I” (2021). Courtesy of False Flag.

9.”Alteronce Gumby: Somewhere Under the Rainbow/The Sky is Blue and What am I Glass am I” at Charles Moffett and False Flag

Sixteen of Alteronce Gumby’s new color-centric abstractions are currently on view in a two-part exhibition split between Charles Moffett in Manhattan and False Flag in Long Island City. At Charles Moffett, visitors will find a selection of Gumby’s visually dazzling gemstone-filled works on panel—lapis lazuli, ruby, amethyst, rose quartz, lemon quartz, fluorite, black tourmaline, and citrine are integrated into his painted glass panels and sealed with acrylic. The exhibition at False Flag, meanwhile, is anchored by a 24-foot-long, six-panel canvas work that, in various shades of blue, considers our relationship to the sky. While rooted in this history of Abstract Expressionism, Gumby’s abstractions, with their seemingly infinite variations of color, consider how light, physics, and natural materials can be contextualized into conversations about race and spirituality. 

Location:  Charles Moffett, 511 Canal Street #200/Buzzer 3; False Flag, 11-22 44th Road Long Island City
Price: Free
Time: Charles Moffett is open by appointment, Thursday–Sunday; False Flag is open by appointment, Friday–Sunday

—Katie White

 

Through Wednesday, September 1

Chris Bogia, The Sun, The City, 2021. Courtesy the artist and Mrs. Photo by Marcie Revens.

Chris Bogia, The Sun, The City, 2021. Courtesy the artist and Mrs. Photo by Marcie Revens.

10. “Chris Bogia: The Sun, the City” and “Jade Yumang: Open House Spatter” from Time Equities Inc. and Art-in-Buildings

A new installation in Lower Manhattan provides a safe, socially distanced way to see art… and one that suggests a day when we will no longer have to socially distance, no less. New York artist Chris Bogia’s The Sun, The City (2021) consists of a radiant, 15-foot-wide mandala hanging on the wall of the lobby at 125 Maiden Lane, shining down on a geometric cityscape. The artist describes the work as having “nostalgic references to groovier times,” and the work is visible from the street, if you don’t want to venture indoors. If you do, though, you’ll also get to experience Jade Yumang’s Open House Spatter (2021), in which he investigates queer histories through design metaphors.

Location: 125 Maiden Lane, New York
Price:
Free
Time: On view daily at all times

—Brian Boucher

 

Through Sunday, September 26

Artist: Collective Magpie; Courtesy of El Museo del Barrio

11. “Estamos Bien: La Trienal 20/21” at El Museo del Barrio, New York

Currently in Harlem’s El Museo del Barrio is a survey of more than 40 established and emerging Latinx contemporary artists from across the diaspora of the United States and Puerto Rico. The exhibition includes a diverse range of subject matters and meda media, resonating with the complexities of identity in the Latinx community. Exhibited artists include Francis Almendárez, Luis Flores, Manuela González, xime izquierdo ugaz, Poncili Creación, Yelaine Rodriguez, and Raelis Vasquez, among others.

Location: El Museo del Barrio, 1230 5th Avenue, New York
Price:
 Suggested admission $9
Time: Saturday and Sunday, 12 p.m.–5 p.m.

—Cristina Cruz

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Marianna Simnett on How She Employs Horror-Inducing ‘Leaps Between Logic’ to Shake Audiences Out of Complacency


Five years ago, Marianna Simnett was sitting in a doctor’s office with a syringe an inch away from her throat. A surgeon was about to insert a dose of Botox into her neck to lower her voice—a painful procedure, she told me in her Berlin studio last month, that would affect her speech for about three months as part of an artwork titled The Needle and the Larynx (2016).

“I was asking for more permanent surgery, and this is what the surgeon was willing to do,” she told me.

In an art world that often cordons off offensive subject matter, Simnett’s work—which has involved masochism, surgeries to orifices, narratives of child murder, animal death, and reanimated roadkill—is a bit dangerous. And for that reason, it can strike themes that are deeply human.

Marianna Simnett, The Needle and the Larynx (2016). Courtesy the artist and Serpentine Galleries, London.

Marianna Simnett, The Needle and the Larynx (2016). Courtesy the artist and Serpentine Galleries, London.

Simnett, who works without a gallery by choice, has created a hybrid model to keep her studio operational: her web shop, which she launched to get through the pandemic, floating her operation while she opened a solo show at the Institute of Modern Art in Brisbane. This year, she will be a part of group shows at the Kunstverein in Bonn and the Julia Stoschek Collection in Berlin, as well as a commission for Castello di Rivoli in Turin.

Simnett moved to Berlin in October after a period of nomadism between a handful of places that included London, rural England, and Australia. The move has not been uncomplicated. She breezed through a list of aggressions she’s experienced in her short time living in Berlin: she’s been shouted at and harrassed, and forced to deal with misogynist bureaucrats. But Berlin has become “softer” since she learned more German, she said—and anyway, she is happy not to live in a metropolis like London. It’s a “sinkhole,” she said. “We need to stopping seeing these monopolizing cities as a paradise or something to aspire to.”

Marianna Simnett<i>Blood In My Milk</i>(2018). Exhibition at New Museum. Photo: Maris Hutchinson. EPW Studio.

Marianna SimnettBlood In My Milk(2018). Exhibition at New Museum. Photo: Maris Hutchinson. EPW Studio.

Peripheries

Simnett is loathe to refer to her nationality by her British passport, especially given that she is half Croatian. In a video made during lockdown, Simnett sits against a wall of vines, painting her face. She moves back and forth between Croatian and English while applying heavy makeup to make her look like a dog; it seems harder and harder to breathe beneath the cosmetics as she speaks from the viewpoint of former Yugoslavian president Josip Broz Tito’s canine pet. But no particular place or culture is at the core of her work. Now, living in Berlin, she told me she could begin to incorporate German culture into her practice.

“I want to dismantle this idea of Western European centrism, that English is the spoken language, and that something must be understood,” she said. “I want to accept and promote more vulnerable ways of speaking and being understood.”

Marianna Simnett's <i>The Bird Game</i> (2019). Courtesy the artist, FVU, the Rothschild Foundation and the Frans Hals Museum .

Marianna Simnett’s The Bird Game (2019). Courtesy the artist, FVU, the Rothschild Foundation and the Frans Hals Museum .

Perhaps that sensibility comes from an upbringing on peripheries. Simnett grew up on London’s outskirts, partly on a houseboat that belonged to her transient father. “Every neighbor is either a clown or a pianist,” she said of her childhood home. “Everyone has chosen to be an outsider.”

Her mother immigrated to the UK from the former Yugoslavia, which suffered a violent breakup through the 1990s and into the 2000s. “My family story on that side is riddled with war,” she said. Her family’s attempt to escape Europe through France at the onset of the Second World War resulted in their capture. Their wealth was liquidated and most of them were murdered, but her Jewish-Croatian grandfather survived after he fainted while being shot at by a firing squad, waking up to find the other prisoner dead. He bit his arm to check that he was still alive, Simnett said.

Marianna Simnett Faint with Light (2016). Installation view at Copenhagen Contemporary, Copenhagen, 2019. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Anders Sune Berg.

Marianna Simnett Faint with Light (2016). Installation view at Copenhagen Contemporary, Copenhagen, 2019. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Anders Sune Berg.

The artist interpreted his survival story with Faint With Light, an installation that will be on view at Julia Stoschek in February as part of “A Fire in My Belly,” a group show focused on acts of violence. In the work, strobe lights pulsate as Simnett passes out by hyperventilating on purpose. 

“My family doesn’t dwell on death and violence, not as much as I do. They say it in a whisper. They describe it like a shopping list. My grandfather wasn’t very nice, but didn’t have nice things done to him. My mom struggles with being nice, and she had some horrible things done to her.” She paused. “I also struggle to be nice.”

She wonders if it is not a result of generational trauma, given that she was born in into a world of privilege by comparison. “And yet there is something tugging on me,” she said. “There is an insistence and a residue that forces me to do what I do.”

Marianna Simnett, Covering (sure thing), (2020). Courtesy_ Marianna Simnett.

Marianna Simnett, Covering (sure thing), (2020). Courtesy_ Marianna Simnett.

Beyond the Pale

In Pillow, a striking and bloody stop-motion animation film Simnett made last year, an interspecies group of roadkill meet for an ceremonious orgy. Their gaping mouths are re-framed as expressions of love and pleasure, not pain caused by human interference. A gentle folk song plays in the background.

Simnett finds the work romantic, and she has a great deal of empathy for animals, which appear throughout her work. In Udder (2014), the mammary gland of a cow undergoes an operation in a comment on bio-capitalism—the extraction of resources from humans and animals is a recurring topic.

“I don’t want art to just decorate… Yet the aim has never been to shock,” she told me. “I want to create a shift internally in someone. More than the gore, what is more frightening about my work are the leaps between logic.

Marianna Simnett The Bird Game (film still) (2019). Courtesy the artist, FVU, the Rothschild Foundation and the Frans Hals Museum.

Marianna Simnett The Bird Game (film still, 2019). Courtesy the artist, FVU, the Rothschild Foundation and the Frans Hals Museum.

Constructing these skips through logic means she can create surrealistic narratives. Scenes of implied child abuse and murder occur in The Bird Game, where a malevolent crow picks kids off, one by one. That work, Simnett said, was more or less canceled by public opinion.

“I think it’s very funny, the things people pick up on and become disturbed by,” she said. “The things I made that were the most violent were self-inflicted, and included self-exploitation or self-abuse—that is fine for people. I’m less precarious now, but the work is being censored more. I am dabbling in fiction, so the work is somewhat safer. But before, the danger was real.”

One problem, she told me, is a rising tide of accelerated cancel culture and political correctness that has seeped into art discourses. “It’s part of our censoring and conservative culture. We want radical art, but we also want to make sure patrons pay for it. Artists need to stick to their guns and not be led by institutional frameworks and box-ticking.”

“Shocking art is much better after a few generations,” she added. “No one likes it at the time. We all like Hermann Nitsch now.” There are boundaries, of course. And shock for it’s own sake does not interest her.

<i>The Udder</i> (2014). Courtesy the artist

The Udder (2014). Courtesy the artist

That environment is one reason she prefers not to work with a gallery.

“Seldomly, I sell my art for ridiculous amounts of money,” she said. “I like having the extremity of a monstrous installation, and then light and dainty things that people can have if they want to be part of it.”

Works on her online shop—including a pillow with a printed still from Pillow of the protagonist squirrel—are all priced at €200 or under. “I don’t give 50 percent to a dealer, so I can keep it affordable.” While she is open to partnering with someone eventually, the situation would need to fit her multi-stranded way of working, something other than the current traditional model of dealer-artist relationships.

“I’d rather invent something new and take a leap of faith with someone who wants to do something experimental in the form of representation,” she said. “The rulebook is just the studio.”

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