Events

Editors’ Picks: 10 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From a Panel on Michelle Obama’s Style to a Show of Frog-Themed Art


Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events, both digitally and in-person in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all ET unless otherwise noted.)

 

Monday, August 30–Saturday, September 25

Daniel Arsham, <I>Bamm-Bamm Bench</i> , (2021). Courtesy of the artist and Friedman Benda.

Daniel Arsham, Bamm-Bamm Bench , (2021). Courtesy of the artist and Friedman Benda.

1. “Daniel Arsham: Objects for Living: Collection II” at Friedman Benda, New York

Multi-hyphenate artist Daniel Arsham is presenting his first solo exhibition of design objects at Friedman Benda’s Chelsea gallery. The collection, dubbed “Objects for Living,” comes on the heels of Arsham’s first foray into “Objects for Living” that debuted as part of Design Miami in 2019. The suite of furniture objects was a fictional version of the Long Island home he grew up in, built by architect Norman Jaffee in 1971; the second collection was inspired by Arsham’s time at home during the pandemic.

Location: Friedman Benda, 515 West 26th Street
Price:
Free
Time: Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Monday, August 30, 2021–Sunday, January 30, 2022

Book Cover with Byzantine Icon of the Crucifixion. Constantinople ivory dates to 1000, late 11th century Spanish setting of silver-gilt with pseudo-filigree, glass, crystal, and sapphire cabochons. Photo courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York,

Book Cover with Byzantine Icon of the Crucifixion. Constantinople ivory dates to 1000, late 11th century Spanish setting of silver-gilt with pseudo-filigree, glass, crystal, and sapphire cabochons. Photo courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York,

2. “Spain, 1000–1200: Art at the Frontiers of Faith” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Met Cloisters, New York

Artifacts from outside the Christian faith are going on display in the Met Cloister’s Fuentidueña Chapel gallery for the first time in this exhibition on the overlapping artistic traditions of the rival Christian, Muslim, and Jewish communities in Medieval Spain. The works on view date from 1000 to 1200, and illustrate shifting power balances between the three faiths over the centuries.

Location: The Met Cloisters, 99 Margaret Corbin Drive, Fort Tryon Park, New York
Price:
 $25 general admission
Time: Thursday–Monday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; from September 7, Sunday–Tuesday and Thursday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m.–9 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Tuesday, August 31

Nati Linares and Caroline Woolard. Photo courtesy of the Art Students League.

Nati Linares and Caroline Woolard. Photo courtesy of the Art Students League.

3. “Artists and The Solidarity Economy: Nati Linares and Caroline Woolard of Art.coop in Conversation” at the Art Students League, New York

The Art Students League hosts a virtual conversation with Nati Linares and Caroline Woolard, founders of Art.coop, about how art schools can help build a more equitable art world by embracing BIPOC artists and cultural workers.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 1 p.m.–2 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, September 1–Saturday, October 23

A still from Sara Cwynar's <i>Glass Life</i> (2021). Courtesy of the artist and Foxy Production.

A still from Sara Cwynar’s Glass Life (2021). Courtesy of the artist and Foxy Production.

4. “Sara Cwynar: Glass Life” at Foxy Production, New York

The title of Sara Cwynar’s new exhibition (as well as her recently-published monograph) comes from The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, Shoshana Zuboff’s 2018 book that—among other things—details the ways in which corporations have exploited advanced imagining techniques to gather unprecedented amounts of behavioral data about all of us. We’re stuck living a “glass life,” Zuboff says, on display and yet tricked into thinking we’re free; our only recourse is to seek out “increasingly complex ways to hide.”

But in the six-channel film at the center of Cwynar’s show, the artist isn’t hiding. Instead, she’s contending with Zuboff’s idea in real time, musing on figures like Euripides, Shakespeare, and John Maynard Keynes while the screen fills with images she’s amassed on hard drives over recent years: of cartoons and artworks, of food and found photographs. The whole thing feels like a fever dream experienced in a Google wormhole.

Location: Foxy Production at 2 East Broadway, 200
Price:
Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Taylor Dafoe

 

Wednesday, September 1Saturday, October 9

Alina Perez, <em>Keep Still (cropped view)</em> (2021). Courtesy Deli Gallery.

Alina Perez, Keep Still (cropped view) (2021). Courtesy Deli Gallery.

5. “Alina Perez: No One Recognizes You as a Puddle” at Deli Gallery, New York

Yale MFA grad Alina Perez’s debut solo show opens at Deli Gallery this Wednesday. Large-scale works in charcoal and pastel emit a striking luminescence, as seen in Keep Still (above), with the light adding to the moodiness of the depicted figures. The title of the exhibition is taken from a poem by late Chicana cultural theorist Gloria Anzaldúa, which contemplates the losses one may experience when on the journey to self-awareness.

Location: Deli Gallery, 36 Water Street, New York
Price:
Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday: 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Cristina Cruz

Thursday, September 2

Amy Sherald, Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama (2018). Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

Amy Sherald, Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama (2018). Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

6. “Brooklyn Talks: The Sartorial Vision of Michelle Obama” at the Brooklyn Museum

We all know Michelle Obama is the GOAT—the first Black woman to be First Lady of the United States, she helmed significant initiatives including Let’s Move, Let Girls Learn, and Joining Forces, went on to write a best-selling memoir and launch a Netflix production company with Barack… and she always looks amazing. Enter Meredith Koop, Obama’s longtime stylist and image strategist who helped refine Obama’s personal style and usher in a new kind of First Lady—one who’s clothes people actually want to wear. Koop will join fashion historian Kimberly M. Jenkins to discuss honing Michelle’s signature look, and the intersection of fashion and politics in general.

Location: Brooklyn Museum, 200 Easter Parkway
Price:
$30
Time: 7 p.m.–8:30 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

Thursday, September 2

Statuette of a Seated Black African Boy, 450-425 BC, Etruscan. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Barbara and Lawrence Fleischman. Image: Bruce White Photography

Statuette of a Seated Black African Boy, 450-425 BC, Etruscan. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Barbara and Lawrence Fleischman. Image: Bruce White Photography

7. “Art Break: Seeing Blackness in Greek and Etruscan Art” a virtual talk hosted by The Getty

This is the latest of a series of Getty virtual events which focus on Black representation in the arts. Experts will focus on a 2,500-year old Etruscan bronze statuette to confront simplistic modern assumptions about race and servitude. They will explore how meanings change when images of Blackness move between cultures and over the course of time. The talk features antiquities curator Claire Lyons and Sarah Derbew, assistant professor of classics at Stanford University.

Derbew’s research focuses on literary and artistic representations of Black people in ancient Greece. She is currently finishing her book, Untangling Blackness in Greek Antiquity (to be published in 2022). Since joining the Getty in 2008, Lyons has curated exhibitions including “The Aztec Pantheon and Art of Empire” (2010) and “Sicily: Art and Invention between Greece and Rome” (2013).

Price: Free with registration
Time: 3 p.m. ET (12 p.m. PT)

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Thursday, September 2–Saturday, October 2

Sarah Slappey, <i>Girl Talk</i> (2021) Image courtesy the artist and Sargent's Daughters.

Sarah Slappey, Girl Talk (2021) Image courtesy the artist and Sargent’s Daughters.

8. “Sarah Slappey: Self Care” at Sargent’s Daughters

In “Self Care,” the Brooklyn-based painter shows off a new body of works, including paintings on canvas and paper, and a series of drawings, that explore the darker and more extreme aspects of idealized femininity. The imagery in her paintings reflect a South Carolina upbringing that was overflowing with exaggerated versions of how girls should look and dress. Slappey herself said: “All of the paintings have a kind of quiet violence.” For the artist, the ideas and imagery of femininity can be a double-edged sword.

Location: Sargent’s Daughters at 179 East Broadway
Price:
Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Saturday, September 4

Installation view, "Wu Tsang: Anthem" at the Guggenheim Museum. Courtesy of the Guggenheim.

Installation view, “Wu Tsang: Anthem” at the Guggenheim Museum. Courtesy of the Guggenheim.

9. “Saturday on the House” at the Guggenheim, New York

On one Saturday at the Guggenheim Museum per month, you can enjoy a full day free of charge. If you choose this day, the first weekend in September, catch the final days of “Wu Tsang: Anthem” a site-specific installation created in collaboration with singer, composer, and activist Beverly Glenn-Copeland, featuring what the artist calls a “sonic sculptural space” resonating through the museum’s iconic spiral architecture.

Location: Solomon Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Ave at 89th Street

Price: Free! *Capacity is limited, timed tickets may be reserved 48 hours in advance.
Time: 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Through Saturday, September 4

Mike Linskie, Noise Above the Storm, 2021. Courtesy of Real Pain.

10. “The Frog Show” at Real Pain, New York

Who doesn’t love frogs? As organizer Reilly Davidson states in the press release, “A frog is a feeling.” This group show at Real Pain includes works by Kenny Schachter, Jan Gatewood, Daniel Boccato, Justine Neuberger, and many more. Go see it before it closes this Saturday.

Location: Real Pain, 30 Orchard Street, New  York
Price:
Free
Time: Wednesday–Sunday: 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Cristina Cruz

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Editors’ Picks: 10 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From Upstate Art Weekend to Eric Carle’s Very Hungry Caterpillar at the Bronx Zoo


Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events, both digitally and in-person in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all ET unless otherwise noted.)

 

Tuesday, August 24

Bethany Collins. Photo by Bob Packert, ©2020 Peabody Essex Museum.

Bethany Collins. Photo by Bob Packert, ©2020 Peabody Essex Museum.

1. “Bethany Collins in Conversation With Mollye Bendell” at the Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.

This Tuesday, Bethany Collins will sit down on Zoom to talk with Mollye Bendell about her practice, her process, and her contribution to the Phillips Collection’s current exhibition, “Jacob Lawrence: The American Struggle” (on view through September 19).

Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 6 p.m.–7 p.m.

—Taylor Dafoe

 

Yoshitomo Nara, <em>One Foot in the Groove (for Donnie Fritts)</em>, 2010. Photo courtesy of Seoul Auction, ©Yoshitomo Nara.

Yoshitomo Nara, One Foot in the Groove (for Donnie Fritts), 2010. Photo courtesy of Seoul Auction, ©Yoshitomo Nara.

2. “One Foot in the Groove: A Yoshitomo Nara Listening Party” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art

In celebration of LACMA’s Yoshitomo Nara exhibition (on view through January 2), author, curator, and USC Annenberg professor Josh Kun will host a virtual night of music and storytelling inspired by the artist and his work.

Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 9 p.m.–10 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, August 25

Cey Adams in his studio. Photo courtesy of Art in DUMBO.

Cey Adams in his studio. Photo courtesy of Art in DUMBO.

3. “Art in DUMBO Drink and Draw Workshops: Delve into Pop Art Collage with Cey Adams” at DUMBO Archway, Brooklyn

Art in DUMBO’s next outdoor Drink and Draw Workshop is hosted by Creatively Wild Art Studio and will feature a lesson in collage-making from artist Cey Adams. The founding creative director of Def Jam Recordings, Adams got his start as a New York City street artist in the late 1970s, appearing in the documentary Style Wars. Today, he is a graphic design legend in the hip hop world, having worked with the likes of the Beastie Boys, Public Enemy, LL Cool J, Jay-Z, and Mary J. Blige.

Location: DUMBO Archway, 155 Water Street, Brooklyn
Price:
Free with registration
Time: 6 p.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

The "100 Years | 100 Women" project.

The “100 Years | 100 Women” project.

4. “100 Years | 100 Women: A Celebration” at Lincoln Center, New York

Ahead of Women’s Equality Day on Thursday, August 26, artists will gather at Lincoln Center for music, dance, and spoken word. The evening is organized in conjunction with the “100 Years | 100 Women” project, which commissioned more than 100 self-identifying women and nonbinary artists to create new work about the complex history of women’s suffrage. Advance registration for the event is closed, but more than 1,000 free seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis 10 minutes before the event starts.

Location: Damrosch Park at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Amsterdam Ave at West 62nd Street, New York
Price:
 Free; also accessible via livestream
Time: 8 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

Nan Stewart

Friday, August 27–Sunday, August 29

Hiba Schahbaz during her residency at Stoneleaf Retreat in 2019. Photo courtesy of Stoneleaf Retreat.

Hiba Schahbaz during her residency at Stoneleaf Retreat in 2019. Photo courtesy of Stoneleaf Retreat.

5. “Upstate Art Weekend” in the Hudson Valley, New York

Last summer, with art fairs on indefinite hold and museums shuttered, former art fair director Helen Toomer saw an opportunity to bring together the art community safely in upstate New York’s Hudson Valley, where she and husband Eric Romano run the Stoneleaf Retreat artist residency in Eddyville. Last year, the inaugural Upstate Art Weekend invited visitors to explore 23 art spaces throughout the region. This year, there are 61 participants, ranging from Storm King and Dia Beacon toward the south up to galleries in Hudson and Art Omi in Ghent, furthest from the city. Stoneleaf is presenting solo exhibitions from Hiba Schahbaz and Liz Collins, plus site-specific projects by Lizania Cruz, Macon Reed, and Rebecca Reeve. There will also be a performance organized by Michele Pred as part of her Art of Equal Pay project that aims to close the gender gap in prices paid for men and women’s artwork. Titled Emergency Response for Pay Equity, it will feature artists Ann Lewis, Holly Ballard Martz, Krista Suh, Michelle Hartney, and Yvette Molina, and take place on Thursday at 4:30 p.m., during the weekend’s opening festivities.

Location: Stoneleaf Retreat, Ashokan Road, Eddyville, New York, and other locations
Price:
Prices vary, reservations required at some events
Time: Times vary

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, August 27–Sunday, October 24

Former U.S. President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama stand next to their unveiled portraits at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images.

Former U.S. President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama stand next to their unveiled portraits at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery. Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images.

6. “The Obama Portraits Tour” at the Brooklyn Museum

Almost certainly the most famous paintings created so far in this century, Kehinde Wiley’s portrait of President Barack Obama and Amy Sherald’s portrait of First Lady Michelle Obama, commissioned by the National Gallery, touch down in New York this week as part of their highly anticipated five-city tour of the nation. Expect long lines—and don’t be surprised to spot artist and satirical Donald Trump impersonator Tootsie Warhol outside the show, where he’ll be clad in his finest Mar-a-lago golf attire, decrying Wiley for having tasked his Chinese studio with completing the painting—a performance that Warhol, a former lawyer, has dubbed The Audacity of Hoping Nobody Notices My Presidential Portrait is Made in China.

Location: The Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York
Price:
 General admission $16
Time: Wednesday and Thursday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Sunday, August 29

"Eric Carle's World of Wildlife" at the Bronx Zoo. Photo courtesy of the Bronx Zoo.

“Eric Carle’s World of Wildlife” at the Bronx Zoo. Photo courtesy of the Bronx Zoo.

7. “Eric Carle’s World of Wildlife” at the Bronx Zoo

The beloved illustrator Eric Carle died in May at age 91, but the Bronx Zoo is bringing some of his most iconic animal artworks to life with performances featuring hand-crafted puppets inspired by his books The Very Hungry Caterpillar; Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?; The Very Busy Spider; and more. The rest of the week, blown up caterpillar illustrations will be on view at the giraffe exhibition, and there will be various educational activities themed to the artist’s work.

Location: Bronx Zoo,  2300 Southern Boulevard, Bronx
Price:
 General admission $39.95
Time: Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m. (puppet performances on Friday–Sunday)

—Sarah Cascone

Through Sunday, August 29

Exterior of Immersive Van Gogh at Pier 26. Photo by Ben Davis.

Exterior of Immersive Van Gogh at Pier 26. Photo by Ben Davis.

8. “Immersive Van Gogh” at Pier 36, New York City

There have been several competing “immersive” Van Gogh experiences across the country this year but this one seems to stand above the rest. There are nearly 100 projectors splashing colorful and intricate moving images of the artist’s signature images—night skies, stars, wheat fields, crows, and numerous self portraitsacross every possible surface. All of this is enhanced by strategically placed mirrors and an eclectic soundtrack that ranges from soaring classical music by Yo-yo Ma, to Edit Piaf’s classic Non, je ne regrette rien, and a moody but haunting song by Thom Yorke, from his Anima solo album. Sure it’s heavy on Instagram and selfie bait but the experience is truly “immersive” and—to be honest—pretty incredible. It will return to NYC in November but for now is closing on August 29.

Location: Pier 36, 299 South Street, New York City
Price:
Starting at $39.99 and up based on package and timing of visit
Time: 9 a.m.–9 p.m. daily via designated time slots

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Through Sunday, September 5

"Christian Boltanski, Animitas" at the Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum. Photo by Nicholas Knight, courtesy of the Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum.

“Christian Boltanski, Animitas” at the Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum. Photo by Nicholas Knight, courtesy of the Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum.

9. “Christian Boltanski, Animitas” at the Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, Long Island City

The Noguchi Museum is currently home to two works by French artist Christian Boltanski, who died in July. In the garden, there’s an installation of his sound sculpture, Animitas, first staged in a remote part of South America’s Atacama Desert in 2014 with 800 bronze bells that bob in the breeze on steel stems. The smaller version on view in Queens still produces what the artist called the “music of lost souls” and is paired with a day-long video documenting a similar work, La Forêt des Murmures (2016), that is on permanent view on the island of Teshima in Japan.

Location: Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, 9-01 33rd Road (at Vernon Boulevard), Long Island City
Price:
General admission $10
Time: Wednesday–Sunday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday, September 11

Christina Barrera's work for "Transient Grounds." Image courtesy Transient Grounds.

Christina Barrera’s work for “Transient Grounds.” Image courtesy Transient Grounds.

10. “Transient Grounds” at Governors Island

ACOMPI and NARS Foundation are presenting this fifteen-artist show dedicated to “immigrant, first-generation, and borderland artists whose work counters the gradual forces of cultural erosion,” all of it on display in an old house on Governors Island. One of the more pointed works is Christina Barrera’s new commission featuring bright red flags draped from the house’s exterior. They seem to send a signal, drawing the eye to the show, only to repeat Kamala Harris’s much criticized speech telling the people of Guatemala that the doors are shut for potential immigrants: “Do Not Come/There’s Nothing Here for You.”

Location: House 6B, Nolan Park, Governors Island, New York
Price: Free
Time: Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m.–5 p.m., and by appointment

—Tanner West

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9 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From a Show of Cringeworthy Art to a Christie’s Conference on NFTs


Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. In light of the global health crisis, we are currently highlighting events in person and digitally, as well as in-person exhibitions open in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all EST unless otherwise noted.)

 

Monday, July 12 and Tuesday, July 13

Neil deGrasse Tyson, Manhattanhenge (2001), sunset looking down 34th Street. One of two days when the sunset is exactly aligned with the grid of streets in Manhattan. Photo ©Neil deGrasse Tyson, courtesy of the American Museum of Natural History.

Neil deGrasse Tyson, Manhattanhenge (2001), sunset looking down 34th Street. One of two days when the sunset is exactly aligned with the grid of streets in Manhattan. Photo ©Neil deGrasse Tyson, courtesy of the American Museum of Natural History.

1. “Manhattanhenge” in New York City

The four-times-a-year phenomenon that is Manhattanhenge, when the setting sun aligns with the city’s street grid, was rained out over Memorial Day Weekend, but we get a second chance at this eminently photographable event this week. For the best Instagram fodder, post up on the east side about a half hour before sunset, and be sure that whatever street you’re on aligns with the grid—if you can’t see through to New Jersey, find a different block!

Location: Crossstreets in Manhattan
Price:
Free
Time:
Monday 8:20 p.m.; Tuesday, 8:21 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, July 14

"Nrityagram: Samhāra Revisited" at the Temple of Dendur at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Photo by Stephanie Berger.

“Nrityagram: Samhāra Revisited” at the Temple of Dendur at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Photo by Stephanie Berger.

2. “Women and the Critical Eye: The Intersection of Performance and Art” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

This edition of the Met’s annual “Women and the Critical Eye” series features a conversation on the intersection of performance and art with Sarah Arison, board chair of the National YoungArts Foundation; dancer and choreographer Bijayini Satpathy; and Met Modern art assistant curator Lauren Rosati, moderated by Limor Tomer, general manager of Live Arts at the Met.

Price: Free registration, but donation suggested
Time: 5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, July 15

Representation of cryptocurrencies and non-fungible token. (Photo by Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Representation of cryptocurrencies and non-fungible token. Photo by Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

3. “Christie’s Art and Tech Summit: NFTs and Beyond” at Christie’s 

In the wake of its $69 million Beeple sale, Christie’s continues to explore the NFT art space with its Art and Tech Summit, an annual one-day conference. The schedule includes topics like “NFT’s Impact on the Art Market: Democratization, Monetization, Emergence, and Sustainability” and “Creating Technology for the Metaverse.” Speakers include leading NFT artists such as Mad Dog Jones (now Canada’s most-expensive living artist, thanks to his recent Phillips sale), crypto art collector Justin Sun (who has also ventured into more traditional fine art trophies), and software engineer and NFT collector Tim Kang (who has launched a nonprofit to help artists mint NFTs).

Location: Christie’s, 20 Rockefeller Plaza, New York
Price:
$250 in person/$100 virtual
Time: 9 a.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Opening Thursday, July 15

The Museum of Chinese in America. Image courtesy of Ajay Suresh via Flickr

The Museum of Chinese in America. Image courtesy of Ajay Suresh via Flickr

4. “Responses: Asian American Voices Resisting the Tides of Racism” at the Museum of Chinese in America

After more than a year of shuttered operations and a five-alarm fire at its collections space, the museum’s main space will reopen with a show on the historical roots of anti-Asian and anti-Asian American Pacific Islander racism from the earliest days of U.S. history. The exhibition is the culmination of the museum’s year-long “OneWorld COVID-19 Special Collection” initiative that gathered submissions of creative, artistic, and public responses to the tumultuous events of 2020 and ’21. Art, essays, videos, music, and physical artifacts were donated by people from across the U.S. and Asian diaspora.

Location: Museum of Chinese in America, 215 Centre Street, New York
Price: 
General admission: $12; seniors, military, educators, students and children two and over $8; members, free
Time: Saturday, Sunday, and Tuesday–Thursday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Thursday, July 15–Friday, August 27

Ron Tarver, <em>David's Last Ride</em> (1996), detail. Courtesy of Chart Gallery.

Ron Tarver, David’s Last Ride (1996), detail. Courtesy of Chart Gallery.

5. “Horses?” at Chart Gallery

When confronted with the essential question of “What is art?” 30 Rock‘s Jack Donaghy did not have to think long to respond. “We know what art is,” he said. “It’s paintings of horses!”

While Donaghy’s definition—which he later expanded to also include “ships with sails” and “men holding up swords while staring off into the distance”—is a little narrow, it’s true, there has been a ton of great art made about our equine friends. Chart, the gallery opened in Tribeca in 2019 by Clara Ha, celebrates this long history with a show called “Horses?” that celebrates the presence of the steed across media. Patricia Cronin’s large installation Tack Room (1997-2021) will be staged at the gallery nearly 25 years after debuting at White Columns, and will feature an entire barn locker room peppered on the walls with postcards of horse-centric works by Delacroix and Degas. And Will Cotton’s work appears—the guy can paint a pretty fantastic gigantic pink unicorn, believe you me.

Elsewhere, Ron Carver’s photos document the culture and history of black cowboys in Philadelphia and East Texas, while David Wojnarowicz snaps a male sex worker dressed as a hat-clad John Wayne type to dig at the idea of the cowboy as a hyper-straight trope. The idea of the “horse girl” is toyed with in Laurel Nakadate’s self-aware on-saddle self-portraits. And, of course, there’s a contribution from Susan Rothenberg, the late artist who spent decades exploring and abstracting the horse as symbol and shape. Clearly, this summer group show isn’t held back all that much by sticking to one subject. Maybe Jack Donaghy was right. Here’s to hoping for a ships-with-sails group show before the summer ends.

Location: Chart gallery, 74 Franklin Street, New York
Price:
Free
Time: Monday–Friday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

—Nate Freeman

 

Though Sunday, July 18

Isaac Peifer, White Boy Summer (2020). Courtesy of THNK1994.

Isaac Peifer, White Boy Summer (2020). Courtesy of THNK1994.

6. “Cringe: Portraits from the Pandemic by Isaac Peifer” at THNK1994

Isaac Peifer’s painted portraits of celebrities are all a little off in an uncanny valley sort of way. It’s as if they were copied from an iPhone covered in vaseline. There are practical reasons for this: the artist just started painting in 2019, for one, and most of his canvases are completed in one sitting—a hyper-reactive form of making that echoes the here-today-gone-tomorrow nature of the artist’s meme-orable subjects.

But the distortions are thematic, too: “My use of portraiture is a commentary on the role notoriety, disgrace, and ‘cringe’ increasingly play in capturing public interest (however briefly) in the digital age,” the artist wrote in a statement for his new show at THNK1994, a roving gallery now operating out of a residential building’s basement in Chinatown.

Each of Peifer’s paintings in the show was made during lockdown—and it’s obvious. On view are portraits of people that, for better or worse (usually for worse), dominated our timelines at various points in the last year: Chet Hanks, Ghislaine Maxwell, Anna Delvey. “Cringe” is the name of the exhibition; it’s also a description of what you’ll probably do upon seeing the work therein.

Location: THNK1994, 9 Monroe Street, basement
Price:
Free
Time: Friday–Sunday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Taylor Dafoe

 

Adolph Gottlieb, <em>Black and White On Pressed Wood</em> (1950). Photo © Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation/licensed by VAGA at ARS, N.Y., courtesy of Pace East Hampton.

Adolph Gottlieb, Black and White On Pressed Wood (1950). Photo © Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation/licensed by VAGA at ARS, N.Y., courtesy of Pace East Hampton.

7. “Thomas Nozkowski” and “Adolph Gottlieb” at Pace, East Hampton

New Yorkers who have decamped to the Hamptons for the summer can enjoy a pair of solo shows at the Pace outpost, featuring Thomas Nozkowski and Adolph Gottlieb. The former offers never-before-seen abstract, colorful paintings on paper; the latter features eight pictographs by Gottlieb, a pioneering Abstract Expressionist who spent much of his later years, beginning in the 1960s, living and working in East Hampton.

Location: Pace, 68 Park Place, East Hampton
Price:
Free
Time: Tuesday—Saturday, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.; Sunday, 12 p.m.–5 p.m.

—Tanner West

 

Through Sunday, August 1

Mark Van Wagner, <em>Greenie</em> (2020). Photo courtesy of Marquee Projects.

Mark Van Wagner, Greenie (2020). Photo courtesy of Marquee Projects.

8. “John Perreault and Mark Van Wagner” at Marquee Projects, Bellport, New York

Beverly Allan Starke and gallery owner Mark Van Wagner co-curated the inaugural exhibition at Bellport’s Marquee Projects, with a retrospective of work from the late artist, poet, and art critic John Perreault. Now, Starke has convinced Van Wagner to show his work in conversation with pieces by his friend. She’s paired Perreault’s “Scratch Paintings”—made by applying white acrylic paint to insulation panels and scraping it off to created abstract line drawings— with Van Wagner’s “Sandboxes” sculptures, made from recycled cardboard boxes covered in beach sand.

Location: Marquee Projects, 14 Bellport Lane, Bellport
Price:
Free
Time: Thursday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday, August 21

Benjamin Langford’s flowers are installed on the walls of the gallery's courtyard in "但聞人語響:Yet, Only Voice Echoed" at Fu Qiumeng Fine Art. Photo courtesy of Fu Qiumeng Fine Art.

Benjamin Langford’s flowers are installed on the walls of the gallery’s courtyard in “但聞人語響:Yet, Only Voice Echoed” at Fu Qiumeng Fine Art. Photo courtesy of Fu Qiumeng Fine Art.

9. “但聞人語響:Yet, Only Voice Echoed” at Fu Qiumeng Fine Art, New York

Our colleague Cathy Fan, editor-in-chief of Midnight Publishing Group News China, is the curator of this group photography show featuring work by Michael Cherney, Lois Conner, Shen Wei, Su Jiehao, Cheng Ronghui, and Benjamin Langford. The unifying theme is imagery drawn from Tang Dynasty poem “Deer Enclosure,” by Wang Wei, an ode to the beautiful scenery of a mountain with a deer pen, which lends the show its title. Like the poem, the photographs in the show don’t have a narrative, instead capturing the sensory experience of a given moment, like Langford’s larger than life sculptural prints of flowers and fruits.

Location: Fu Qiumeng Fine Art, 65 East 80th Street, New York
Price:
 Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

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8 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From Ming Smith’s Air Jordan Campaign to an Art Advisor’s New Podcast


Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. In light of the global health crisis, we are currently highlighting events in person and digitally, as well as in-person exhibitions open in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all EST unless otherwise noted.)

 

Tuesday, June 29–Friday, July 2

Ming Smith's photograph for the new Air Jordan campaign. Courtesy of the artist and Nicola Vassel.

Ming Smith’s photograph for the new Air Jordan campaign. Courtesy of the artist and Nicola Vassell.

1. “Here for a Reason” at Nicola Vassell

What happens when a revered photographer teams up with one of the biggest and most ubiquitous brands in the world to shoot the best athletes at the top of their game? At “Here for a Reason,” Ming Smith shows us. The exhibition marks the launch of a campaign she shot to celebrate the WNBA for Air Jordan—a campaign that features His Airness himself.

Location: 138 10th Avenue
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 4 p.m.–8 p.m.

—Nan Stewart

 

Tuesday, June 29

Megan Fox Kelly. Photo courtesy of Megan Fox Kelly.

2. “Reading the Art World: Tiqui Atencio Demirdjian” at Megan Fox Kelly Art Advisory

Art advisor Megan Fox Kelly, president of the Association of Professional Art Advisors, has a new interview series featuring authors of new books on art. First on deck will be collector Tiqui Atencio Demirdjian, whose book For Art’s Sake: Inside the Home of Art Dealers was published by Rizzoli last fall. Each livestreamed interview will also become a podcast episode.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 12 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, June 30

"Henry

3. “The Shoo Sho, Curated by Julie Curtiss” at Anton Kern’s Window

From Van Gogh’s painting of humble peasant shoes to the pin-heeled stilettos of Andy Warhol’s screenprints, shoes are a constant in art history, and Julie Curtiss takes up the theme for a show she has just curated. Like Carrie Bradshaw salivating over Manolo’s through glass, you can look but not touch (or even go inside) to see the foot candy. Works by Genesis Belanger, Richard McGuireand Henry Gunderson are just a few of the highlights.

Location: Anton Kern’s Window at 91 Walker Street, corner of Walker & Lafayette Street
Price: Free
Time: 24/7

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Wednesday, June 30

Joel Meyerowitz,'s Wild Flowers. © Joel Meyerowitz. Courtesy of Rizzoli.

Joel Meyerowitz,’s Wild Flowers. © Joel Meyerowitz. Courtesy of Rizzoli.

4. Joel Meyerowitz: Wild Flowers Virtual Event

To celebrate an expanded edition of Joel Meyerowitz’s 1983 photobook Wild Flowers, the artist will be in conversation with artist and writer Gus Powell. “I remember thinking that it was kind of ballsy of me at the time, after making two books with the large format camera, which were kind of sensual and serious and about space and light and other photographic subjects, to turn around and do this,” Meyerowitz told An Other Mag. The new edition features unpublished pictures from the artist’s 40-year repository of street photography.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 12 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Wednesday, June 30 and Thursday, July 1

Cornelius Annor, A Night with Osibisa 2021. Courtesy the artist and Venus Over Manhattan, New York.

5. “Indoor Dining” at Marinaro and “The Interior” at Venus Over Manhattan

On Wednesday, the Chatham Square gallery Marinaro will open a survey called “Indoor Dining,” a nod to our tradition of breaking bread in enclosed spaces—outlawed for much of a year but now gloriously restored. Naturally, the show will have artists who fixate on memorable interiors (Nick Buffon, Peter Shire) paint luscious depictions of food (Gina Beavers, Katherine Bernhardt) or do both (Nikki Malouf, Chloe Wise). A day later and some 80 blocks uptown, Venus Over Manhattan will stage “The Interior,” a slightly more sober investigation into how artists occupy roofed spaces. This time, a long list of artists both emerging (Tunji Adeniyi-Jones, Ana Benaroya, Anna Park) and established (Jessie Homer French, Marley Freeman, Beavers again) will mine the emotions caused by the idea of enclosure.

Location: Marinaro at 1 Oliver Street, Venus Over Manhattan at 980 Madison Avenue
Price: Free
Time: 5 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Nate Freeman

 

Wednesday, June 28—Friday, August 13

Stuart DavisDancers on Havana Street) (1920) © 2021 Estate of Stuart Davis. / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.

Stuart DavisDancers on Havana Street) (1920) © 2021 Estate of Stuart Davis. / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.

6. “Stuart Davis in Havana” at Kasmin Gallery, New York

The American Modernist painter Stuart Davis is famous for his colorful, jazz-influenced paintings and compositions, but this exhibition showcases 10 evocative early watercolors painted in 1920 during his brief yet formative trip to Havana, Cuba, where he rested after contracting Spanish flu. Curated by Davis estate adviser Priscilla Vail Caldwell in collaboration with artist’s son, Earl Davis, the show is the first to showcase the paintings. In addition to the works, the show includes archival material documenting the artist’s trip, including postcards, lottery tickets, and his passport.

Location: Kasmin Gallery 297 Tenth Avenue, New York
Price:
Free
Time: Tuesday—Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Through Saturday, August 6

Andrew Cranston, <i>Waiting for the Bell</i>, (2021). Courtesy of Karma.

Andrew Cranston, Waiting for the Bell (2021). Courtesy of Karma.

7. “Andrew Cranston: Waiting for the Bell” at Karma

The U.K.-based artist Andrew Cranston’s first solo show in New York includes a delightful array of small and large-scale works. In pictures like Assembly (Three musicians), a rose-colored canvas almost completely engulfs the picture, while in Waiting for the Bell, a lone figure sits amid a forest, lily pond, or maybe Kusama infinity room with a white dog on her lap.

Location: 188 & 172 East 2nd Street
Price:
Free
Time: Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Through Friday, August 20

Mark Barrow and Sarah Parke, Woman IX (2021). Courtesy of JDJ.

Mark Barrow and Sarah Parke, Woman IX (2021). Courtesy of JDJ.

8.  “Family Business” at JDJ 

For three years, JDJ has been presenting an intriguing array of contemporary exhibitions in a former icehouse in Garrison, New York. Now the gallery is inaugurating a new Tribeca location with the group show “Family Business,” which brings together works by a group of artists who have played important roles in the gallery’s development, including Lucia Love, Athena LaTocha, and the duo Barrow Parke, who will present an acrylic and embroidery work from a new series focused on fertility statues such as the Venus of Willendorf. 

Location: JDJ, 373 Broadway
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Friday, 12 p.m.– 4 p.m. 

— Katie White 

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11 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From Katie Bell’s Joyful Ode to the Past to Young Space’s Latest Online Show


Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. In light of the global health crisis, we are currently highlighting events in person and digitally, as well as in-person exhibitions open in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all EST unless otherwise noted.)

 

Monday, May 31

Lee Blalock, <i>Ev3ryd4y Cyb0rg (Season 1, Episode 3: L0:F1 loop)</i> (2019).

Lee Blalock, Ev3ryd4y Cyb0rg (Season 1, Episode 3: L0:F1 loop) (2019).

1. “Navigating Digital Identities: Translation, Bodies, and Paratexts” at the NYU Abu Dhabi Art Gallery

Lee Blalock, a Chicago-based artist known for his techno-mediated explorations of post-human anatomies, will sit down with professor Dima Ayoub, director of the Middle East Studies Program at Middlebury College, for a conversation about digital bodies. The dialogue accompanies “Not in, of, Along, or Relating to a Line,” NYU Abu Dhabi’s ambitious exhibition of artists and collectives who “employ technology for self-expression and self-fashioning.”

Price: Free
Time: 7:30 p.m.

—Taylor Dafoe

 

Thursday, June 3

Installation view of "Jose Dávila: The Circularity of Desire" at Sean Kelly, New York. Photo by Jason Wyche, courtesy of Sean Kelly, New York.

Installation view of “Jose Dávila: The Circularity of Desire” at Sean Kelly, New York. Photo by Jason Wyche, courtesy of Sean Kelly, New York.

2. “Curator Conversation: Jose Dávila and Pedro H. Alonzo” at Sean Kelly Gallery, New York

In conjunction with Jose Dávila’s exhibition, “The Circularity of Desire” (though June 19), Sean Kelly Gallery will host a virtual conversation with the artist and Pedro H. Alonzo, adjunct curator at Dallas Contemporary, about the works on view. Made during the pandemic, these paintings, sculptures, and silkscreens on cardboard grew out of Dávila’s research into the iconography of the circle in 20th- and 21st-century art history.

Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 3 p.m.

—Tanner West

 

Thursday, June 3–Friday, July 2

Dana James, <em>Homecoming</em> (2021). Courtesy of Hollis Taggart.

Dana James, Homecoming (2021). Courtesy of Hollis Taggart.

3. “Dana James: Something I Meant to Say” at Hollis Taggart, New York

In her first show at Hollis Taggart, Dana James presents abstract oil-and-acrylic paintings “The strips [of canvas] act as a panorama of linear time; they serve as a reminder that we are small and predictable creatures, incessantly creating and shedding beautiful accounts of the earth and its elements. Upon completion, they are visual diaries that speak to contradiction,” the artist said in a statement.

Location: Hollis Taggart, 521 West 26th Street, New York
Time: Opening reception, 5:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m. with RSVP; Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Appointments recommended.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, June 3–October

Grada Kilomba, Creon</em> (2020), from the series "Heroines, Birds and Monsters". Photo courtesy of the artist, the Amant Foundation, and Goodman Gallery, ©Grada Kilomba.

Grada Kilomba, Creon (2020), from the series “Heroines, Birds and Monsters”. Photo courtesy of the artist, the Amant Foundation, and Goodman Gallery, ©Grada Kilomba.

4. “Grada Kilomba: Heroines, Birds, and Monsters” at Amant, Brooklyn

The Italian art nonprofit Amant from the Tuscan village of Chiusure is inaugurating its East Williamsburg campus with the first U.S. show of Berlin-based artist, psychologist, and theorist Grada Kilomba. A cafe and performance space will follow in June, with an international residency program kicking off in the fall.

Location: Amant, 315 Maujer Street, Brooklyn
Price:
Free
Time: Tuesday–Sunday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, June 4

Siah Armahani's work at Waterfront Plaza outside Brookfield Place in New York City. Photo courtesy of the Battery Park City Authority.

Siah Armahani’s work at Waterfront Plaza outside Brookfield Place in New York City. Photo courtesy of the Battery Park City Authority.

5. “Curator Walking Tour: Public Art in Lower Manhattan” from the Museum of the City of New York

Museum of the City of New York curator Lilly Tuttle will lead this walking tour exploring the ways in which public art and architecture helped transform Lower Manhattan from an industrial, maritime port neighborhood to the bustling waterfront business district of the 21st century.

Location: Lower Manhattan (starting point TBD)
Price:
$25
Time: 4 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

—Nan Stewert

 

Saturday, June 5–Friday, July 2

Gabriel Mills, Our Last Night Together, (2021). Image courtesy the artist and Lyles & King

Gabriel Mills, Our Last Night Together, (2021).
Image courtesy the artist and Lyles & King

6. “In Praise of Shadows” at Lyles and King Gallery, New York

This group show curated by Ebony L. Haynes, now a director at David Zwirner gallery, is an iteration of the Yale MFA painting and printmaking 2021 exhibition that was installed in New Haven at the start of the year. It features works by Vamba Bility, Brianna Rose Brooks, David Craig, Danielle De Jesus, Nathaniel Donnett, and Leyla Faye, among others.

Location: Lyles and King Gallery, 21 Catherine Street, New York
Price: Free
Time: Opening 2 p.m.–6 p.m.; Tuesday—Saturday 11 a.m.—6 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Through Sunday, June 20

Hawazin Al Otaibi, Softboii (2021). Courtesy of the artist and Young Space.

Hawazin Al Otaibi, Softboii (2021). Courtesy of the artist and Young Space.

7. “Strange Paradigm” at Young Space 

Young Space presents its 10th online exhibition, “Strange Paradigm,” a group show that explores the psychological experience of jamais vu. The inverse of déjà vu, jamais vu describes the sensation of the familiar seeming eerily unfamiliar—an experience many of us may be having as life returns trepidatiously to normal (at least in the U.S.). In this show, 16 artists take a closer look at the relationships between our emotional and physical experiences through the lens of cultural identity. Particularly intriguing are artist Hawazin Al Otaibi’s softened, almost fuzzy portraits that question depictions of gender and masculinity, as are Iranian-born artists Morteza Khakshoor’s winkingly humorous portraits in which figures appear in a variety of curious tableaux.

Price: Free
Time: On view daily at all times

—Katie White 

 

An installation view of Katie Bell: Arena" at Spencer Brownstone. Photo courtesy of Spencer Brownstone Gallery.

An installation view of Katie Bell: Arena” at Spencer Brownstone. Photo courtesy of Spencer Brownstone Gallery.

8. “Katie Bell: Arena” at Spencer Brownstone, New York

Katie Bell’s can’t-miss first solo show at Spencer Brownstone gallery looks like it’s still being installed—or maybe deinstalled—and that’s exactly the point. The works on view, many of them made from materials the artist scavenged around New York, reference Classical antiquity (columns in particular are a recurring theme), but without being burdened by any awkward historical weight. Instead, these brightly colorful works, which are strewn about the gallery in the manner of Robert Morris’s Scatter Piece, suggest that heavy old things like the past can actually be colorful, joyful curios.

Location: 170-A Suffolk St, New York
Price:
Free
Time: Wednesday–Sunday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Pac Pobric

 

Through Friday, June 25

Jennifer Bartlett, <i>Wedding</i> (2000-02). Courtesy of the artist and Paula Cooper Gallery.

Jennifer Bartlett, Wedding (2000-02). Courtesy of the artist and Paula Cooper Gallery.

9. “Jennifer Bartlett” at Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

In Jennifer Bartlett’s current show at Paula Cooper, maps take the role of medium and subject. The grid structure of maps have long held appeal to the artist, but in these works, many of the maps are completely unrecognizable, transformed into dot-covered abstractions, transforming border lines into undulating forms and large countries into skewed forms. “By shifting these geographical markers… Bartlett questions the presumed objectivity of her source materials, in particular those that claim to depict disputed terrains,” the gallery said in a statement.

Location: Paula Cooper Gallery, 524 West 26th Street, New York
Price:
 Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Nan Stewart

 

Through Saturday, June 26

Installation view of “Jason Fox: 5 Seasons” at Canada, New York. Photo courtesy of Canada, New York.

Installation view of “Jason Fox: 5 Seasons” at Canada, New York. Photo courtesy of Canada, New York.

10. “Jason Fox: 5 Seasons” at Canada, New York

Currently on view at Canada gallery is “5 Seasons,” the gallery’s third solo exhibition of American artist Jason Fox’s work. The show features seven large paintings of an assortment of pop culture icons including George Harrison, Jennifer Lawrence, Bob Marley, Joni Mitchell, and Puff the Magic Dragon. Using Ab-Ex styles and tin foil, Fox adds texture to the surface of these acrylic, oil, and graphite paintings.

Location: Canada, 60 Lispenard Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday: 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Cristina Cruz

 

Through Friday, July 23

Nick Irzyk, <em>Baroque Promise</em> (2020). Photo courtesy of the artist.

Nick Irzyk, Baroque Promise (2020). Photo courtesy of the artist.

11. “44 Signs of the Times” at Mana Contemporary, Jersey City

Curated by Owen Duffy, director of the Yeh Art Gallery at St. John’s University in Queens, this exhibition brings together 44 works that illuminate the weirdness of recent times, made before the pandemic, during lockdown, and since restrictions have eased. “This exhibition does not aspire to offer a diagnosis of what ails the times or a prescriptive cure,” Duffy said in a statement. “Rather it is a document, an incomplete picture of our world from within.” Featured artists include Trevor Paglen, Savannah Knoop, and Cynthia Talmadge.

Location: Mana Contemporary, 888 Newark Avenue, Jersey City
Price:
Free
Time: By appointment

—Sarah Cascone

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