Center

The Art Renewal Center Is Honoring the Best of Realist Art—by Sending the Winners of its Annual Competition to the Moon


The Art Renewal Center (ARC), based in New Jersey, has maintained a mission of promoting and preserving the tradition of realist art since its founding in 2009. A core tenet in both the ARC’s inception and ongoing operation is the transmission of technical skills—from Old Master to contemporary—needed for creating representational art, as the genre’s presence in schools and studios has dwindled. Today, there are over 85 ARC-endorsed schools and art programs, and an extensive collection of online resources, that together with ARC’s exhibitions and partnerships are bringing 21st-century realist art to the fore once again.

This month, on January 2, the ARC announced the winners and finalists of its 16th International ARC Salon Competition—the largest competition in the world dedicated to contemporary representational art. The salon ultimately received over 5,400 entries from 75 countries.

The top honor of best in show—accompanied by a $25,000 cash prize—was awarded to Mark Pugh for his work An Unsatisfying Ending (2021). Speaking of his work, Pugh said, “With most of my paintings I try to tell a story. Here a young girl has torn up the pages of a book she was not happy with, while hiding it behind her back. I wanted to make sure the look on her face matched the story being told. The sunflowers behind her reflect her mood, and mirror her stance.”

Other notable entries included Chanel Cha’s Dreaming (2022), first-place winner in the Portrait category; Narelle Zeller’s The Weaving (2022), first-place winner in the Still Life category; and Césare Orrico’s Bifronte (2021), first-place winner in the Sculpture category. Together with the other first-place winners and finalists, these honorees exemplify the creativity and diversity of today’s realist art, as well as the thriving community of artists the ARC has fostered. The organization acquired 11 works, valued at more than $80,000, from the competition for its permanent collection, exemplifying the ARC’s commitment to supporting and preserving realist art and artists.

This summer, an exhibition comprising between 75 and 100 works from the competition will be shown at Sotheby’s flagship galleries in New York, running from July 14 through July 24, 2023. Additionally, the winners’ and finalists’ work will be included in the Lunar Codex‘s “Polaris Collection,” wherein images of the work—either as laser-etched nickel microfiche or on memory cards—will be added to a time capsule on the Griffin lunar lander. The Griffin will be launched and livestreamed by SpaceX in late 2023 and will place the time capsule on the moon.

See a selection of first-place winners below.

Chanel Cha, Dreaming (2022). First place, portrait category. Courtesy of the Art Renewal Center.

Chanel Cha, Dreaming (2022). First Place, Portrait. Courtesy of Art Renewal Center.

Narelle Zeller, The Weaving (2022). First Place/Still Life. Courtesy of the Art Renewal Center.

Narelle Zeller, The Weaving (2022). First Place, Still Life category. Courtesy of Art Renewal Center.

Jake Gaedtke, Midnight Shadows (2021). First Place/Landscape Category. Courtesy of the Art Renewal Center.

Jake Gaedtke, Midnight Shadows (2021). First Place, Landscape category. Courtesy of Art Renewal Center.

Césare Orrico, Bifronte (2021). First Place/Sculpture Category. Courtesy of Art Renewal Center.

Césare Orrico, Bifronte (2021). First Place, Sculpture category. Courtesy of Art Renewal Center.

Jim McVicker, Begonias and Sunlight (2021). First Place/Plein Air Painting. Courtesy of Art Renewal Center.

Jim McVicker, Begonias and Sunlight (2021). First Place, Plein Air Painting category. Courtesy of Art Renewal Center.

See all the first-place winners and learn more about the Art Renewal Center Salon here.

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Editors’ Picks: 16 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From David Hammons at the Drawing Center to Duke Riley on the Great Molasses Flood


Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. In light of the global health crisis, we are currently highlighting events and digitally, as well as in-person exhibitions open in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all EST unless otherwise noted.)

 

Launching Monday, February 1

Courtesy of Paradice Palase and Jen Shepard

1. Launch of apparel editions + art under $800 at Paradice Palase, Brooklyn

Paradice Palase is doubling down on it’s efforts to highlight affordable art by launching a new platform, apparel editions, where they are pairing limited-edition artist-designed t-shirts with artworks by Paul Anagnostopoulos, Emily Oliveira, Mitchell Reece, and Jen Shepard. All works are available for under $800 and are an excellent way to collect and support fabulous young artists.

Price: Free
Time: Ongoing

—Neha Jambhekar

 

Tuesday, February 2

Nina Katchadourian, composite of stills from <em>Orientation Video</em> (2020). Photo courtesy of Catharine Clark Gallery.

Nina Katchadourian, composite of stills from Orientation Video (2020). Photo courtesy of Catharine Clark Gallery.

2. “2020–21 Fine Arts Visiting Artists Lecture Series: Nina Katchadourian” at Pratt Institute, New York

Curator and cultural anthropologist Niama Safia Sandy moderates this talk with visiting artist Nina Katchadourian about her varied career, from taking faux Old Master portraits in airplanes bathrooms, to a failed presidential campaign graveyard, to an audio guide on dust for the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 7 p.m.–8 p.m.

—Tanner West 

 

Tuesday, February 2–Saturday, March 20

Eric Standley, <em>Omnia</em> detail). Photo courtesy of Dinner Gallery, New York.

Eric Standley, Omnia detail). Photo courtesy of Dinner Gallery, New York.

3. “Eric Standley: Songs for the Living” at Dinner Gallery, New York

The former VICTORI + MO gallery presents a selection of Eric Standley’s stunning laser cut-paper sculptures. These labor-intensive works, with their ornate geometric designs, recall the intricate detail of carvings found in Gothic cathedrals.

Location: Dinner Gallery, 242 West 22nd Street, New York
Price: Free
Time: By appointment

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, February 3

Irving Penn, <em>Eye In Keyhole, New York</em> (1953). Photo courtesy of Pace, New York.

Irving Penn, Eye In Keyhole, New York (1953). Photo courtesy of Pace, New York.

4. “On Radical Modernism, ‘Photographism,’ and Irving Penn” at Pace, New York

On the occasion of Pace’s current solo show “Irving Penn: Photographism” (on view through February 18) the gallery brings together three heavy hitters: Grace Coddington, of Vogue fame; Jefferson Hack, of Dazed Media; and critic and newly minted Gagosian director Antwaun Sargent. They will discuss the artist’s career and legacy in a Zoom panel moderated by gallery curatorial director Mark Beasley.

Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 1 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, February 3, and Thursday, February 4

Galerie Chenel at Masterpiece London 2019. Ben Fisher Photography, courtesy of Masterpiece London.

Galerie Chenel at Masterpiece London 2019. Ben Fisher Photography, courtesy of Masterpiece London.

5. “Masterpiece Symposium | Journeys through the Material World” at Masterpiece London

Masterpiece London is launching its digital program for 2021 with a series of discussions surrounding the different materials that are used to create artworks. On Wednesday, a panel of leading curators and scholars will discuss “The Stories of Materials,” from mythological narratives to historical trade. On Thursday, experts will discuss “Materials in the Museum,” including methods of display and interpretation for materials from metal to glass.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 5 p.m.–6:30 p.m. GMT (12 p.m.–1:30 p.m. ET)

—Naomi Rea

 

Thursday, February 4

Duke Riley "scrimshaw" sculptures made from discarded plastic. Photo courtesy of Praise Shadows Art Gallery, Boston.

Duke Riley “scrimshaw” sculptures made from discarded plastic. Photo courtesy of Praise Shadows Art Gallery, Boston.

6. “Artist’s Talk: Duke Riley with Curator Jen Mergel” at Praise Shadows Art Gallery, Boston

Timed to the opening of the artist’s first solo show in his hometown of Boston—”Lovers, Muggers, and Thieves,” on view through March 7—Duke Riley will give a Zoom talk with curator Jen Mergel about the exhibition, which features “scrimshaw” sculptures made with discarded plastic and a mosaic depicting the Great Molasses Flood, the 1919 disaster that saw a literal wave of 2.3 million gallons of scalding hot molasses that killed 21 Bostonians.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Installation view, "Tworkov: Towards Nirvana/Works from the 70s" Jack Tworkov,  <i>Q3-72 #5</i> (1972). Photo courtesy of Van Doren Waxter, ©2021 Estate of Jack Tworkov/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Installation view, “Tworkov: Towards Nirvana/Works from the 70s” Jack Tworkov, Q3-72 #5 (1972). Photo courtesy of Van Doren Waxter, ©2021 Estate of Jack Tworkov/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

7. “Jason Andrew and Dorsey Waxter in Conversation” at Van Doren Waxter, New York

Right now at Van Doren Waxter’s stately Upper East Side gallery, a historical exhibition of Jack Tworkov’s geometric compositions is on view in “Tworkov: Towards Nirvana / Works from the 70s.” The Polish artist is considered among the first generation of Abstract Expressionists, though his work is best known in its later iterations, when he turned from gestural abstraction toward rigid geometric compositions informed in large part by the Fibonacci sequence of numbers. On the occasion of the show, which runs through March 20, Jason Andrew, of the late artist’s estate, and the gallery’s Dorsey Waxter will discuss Tworkov’s painting practice, and his quest for ultimate artistic expression.

Price: Free
Time: 4 p.m. on Instagram live @vandorenwaxter

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Studio K.O.S. and Wexler Gallery. Image courtesy Studio K.O.S.

Studio K.O.S. and Wexler Gallery. Image courtesy Studio K.O.S.

8. “Art, Community, Accountability & Agape Love in a Post-Trump Administration,” at School of Visual Arts, New York

MFA art practice faculty and Kids of Survival member Angel Abreu will moderate a virtual talk between Ken Tan, Jeannine A. Cook, and fellow K.O.S. member and BFA Fine Arts faculty member Robert Branch about the way forward—with a focus on community and the role artists play in healing social unrest—in order to move toward a more constructive, peaceful world as we recover from the previous administration.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 6 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Joan Jonas, <em>Vertical Roll</em> (1972). Still courtesy of Joan Jonas/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York/Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels.

Joan Jonas, Vertical Roll (1972). Still courtesy of Joan Jonas/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York/Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels.

9. “Viewfinder Virtual Screening Series: Joan Jonas and the Inner Worlds of Video” at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC

Following a virtual screening of Joan Jonas’s Left Side Right Side (1972) and Vertical Roll (1972), curators Saisha Grayson of the Smithsonian American Art Museum and Charlotte Ickes of the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC, will talk about the artist’s career and her use of the video camera to suggest internal space. The talk is part of the “Viewfinder: Women’s Film and Video from the Smithsonian” virtual film screening and conversation series from the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative, Because of Her Story.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 5:30 p.m.

—Nan Stewert

 

Thursday, February 4–Sunday, May 9

Curran Hatleberg, Lost Coast (8), 2014. Photo ©Curran Hatleberg, courtesy of the International Center of Photography, New York.

Curran Hatleberg, Lost Coast (8), 2014. Photo ©Curran Hatleberg, courtesy of the International Center of Photography, New York.

10. “But Still, It Turns: Recent Photography from the World” at the International Center of Photography, New York

ICP has brought together projects by nine contemporary photographers for this group show curated by Paul Graham. Those include Kristine Potter’s Manifest, photos taken in Colorado that speak to the archetype of the American cowboy and reconsiders traditions of Western landscape photography; and Curran Hatleberg’s Lost Coast, an intimate, episodic portrait of the community in Eureka, California. “This photography is ‘post documentary,’” said Graham. “The work… grapples directly with the world around—nothing staged, constructed, or dramatized. The show contains a principled refusal of photography that only pursues ‘prize-winning moments.’”

Location: International Center of Photography, 79 Essex Street, New York
Price:
 General admission $16
Time: Thursday–Sunday, 11 a.m.–7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, February 5

Margaret Kimbell Drawing Maps in Comics Workshop. Courtesy of the <em>Beliver</em>.

Margaret Kimbell Drawing Maps in Comics Workshop. Courtesy of the Beliver.

11. “Drawing Maps in Comics With Margaret Kimball” at the Believer, Las Vegas

My in-person art experiences have remained extremely limited even with galleries and museums open in New York City, but I’ve been periodically tuning in for Believer magazine’s weekly comics workshops. Each session offers a fascinating insight into an artist’s creative process, and a chance to test out their techniques for yourself. This week’s class on drawing maps, from Margaret Kimbell, author of the forthcoming illustrated memoir And Now I Spill the Family Secrets, sounds especially fun at a time when I’m largely confined to the few blocks around my apartment.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, February 5–Sunday, May 23

David Hammons inside the Slauson Avenue Studio creating a body print in Los Angeles, 1974. Photo by Bruce W. Talamon, courtesy of the artist.

David Hammons inside the Slauson Avenue Studio creating a body print in Los Angeles, 1974. Photo by Bruce W. Talamon, courtesy of the artist.

12. “David Hammons: Body Prints, 1968–1979” at the Drawing Center, New York

In the first museum show spotlighting the important early works on paper of David Hammons, the Drawing Center brings together 32 works, including monoprints, collages, and two sculpture objects. His unconventional large-scale body prints, such as Pray for America (1974)—performance-based works that transformed the body into an art-making tool—introduce the major themes that have been throughlines in the artists’s fifty-year career.

Location: The Drawing Center, 35 Wooster Street
Price:
 Free
Time: Wednesday–Sunday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday, February 6

Mie Yim: Psychotropic Dance, Installation View Courtesy of Olympia

13. “Mie Yim: Psychotropic Dance” at Olympia, New York

Make sure to check out Korean artist Mie Yim’s first solo show at Olympia before it closes this week. The artist was forced to reconsider her practice and the surface size of her work upon the closure of her studio at the start of the pandemic. The results are these trippy works on paper, full of vibrant colors and organic shapes that never quite make it clear what they are but seem somehow familiar.

Location: Olympia, 41 Orchard Street, New York
Price:
 Free
Time: Thursday–Sunday, 11 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Neha Jambhekar

 

Through Saturday, February 20

Installation view of "Iman Raad: At The Earliest Ending of Winter" at Sargent's Daughter. Image courtesy the artist and Sargent's Daughters.

Installation view of “Iman Raad: At The Earliest Ending of Winter” at Sargent’s Daughter. Image courtesy the artist and Sargent’s Daughters.

14. “Iman Raad: At the Earliest Ending of Winter” at Sargent’s Daughters, New York

This eye-catching, just-opened show marks the Iranian-born, US-based artist Iman Raad’s second solo show with the gallery, featuring large-scale canvas and reverse glass paintings. The title is taken from a Wallace Stevens poem, Not Ideas About The Thing But The Thing Itself. Raad’s work explores the landscape of the self in domestic scenes marked by vibrant hues and unusual placements of birds and other objects—the feathered friends dive into teacups or hold the edges of knives in their talons. This work “references this in-between moment where time and feeling meet in an extended pause, and a possible new knowledge of reality,” according to a statement from the gallery.

Location: Sargent’s Daughters, 179 East Broadway, New York
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Through Saturday, February 27

Juan Gris, Paysage (Maisons à Beaulieu) (1918) Image courtesy Galerie Gmurzynska

Juan Gris,
Paysage (Maisons à Beaulieu)
(1918) Image courtesy Galerie Gmurzynska

15. “Drawing Inspiration: A Century of Works on Paper” at Galerie Gmurzynska, New York

This selection of drawings spans 100 years, and includes work by Pablo Picasso, Joan Miro, Marcel Duchamp, Zaha Hadid, Ed Ruscha, Robert Delaunay, and Jean Arp. Among the highlights is a large drawing by Miro from 1930,  executed with a single, uninterrupted line. It highlights the artists skill as a draughtsman and his affinity for draughtsmanship.

Location: Galerie Gmurzynska, 43 East 78th Street, New York
Price: Free
Time: Monday–Friday 12 p.m.–5 p.m.; appointments encouraged

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Through Friday, March 12

Kate Pincus-Whitney, Feast in the Neon Jungle: Last Picnic in Providence, 2020 Courtesy of Fredericks & Freiser

16. “Kate Pincus-Whitney: Feast in the Neon Jungle” at Fredericks & Freiser, New York

Fredericks & Freiser presents a solo show of Los Angeles-based artist, Kate Pincus-Whitney. The works are “maximalist” still lifes of elaborately set up dinner parties or picnics, where one can imagine a large group of friends gathered for a celebration. She populates the canvas with “things,” filling the entire surface with objects such as food, drinks, flowers, and dishes, that we are all familiar with as a way to comment on consumption. Instead of making the works look busy, this has the effect of making them look like ornately decorated objets d’art, paintings that you can stare at for a long time to keep finding hidden things that you didn’t see before.

Location: Fredericks & Freiser, 536 West 24th Street, New York
Price:
 Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Neha Jambhekar

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One of Italy’s Leading Contemporary Art Museums Will Be Transformed Into a Vaccination Center


The Castello di Rivoli has offered up its galleries to help the vaccination effort in Italy. The Turin museum will be the first cultural venue to transform itself into a vaccination center for the public.

The pilot program will begin in March or April, depending on the timeline of the rollout of the vaccine for medical workers and in-patient elderly folk, who will be vaccinated first.

Museum director Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev says in a statement that the museum is “well-equipped” for the initiative with the space needed to maintain social distancing. Climate-control, security, and timed entry protocols are also already in place, all of which are essential to smoothly running vaccine center. “Our friendly museum guides are well-trained in monitoring the public,” Christov-Bakargiev adds.

The museum is partnering with the Rivoli health authorities on the initiative. The third floor of the museum, which sprawls 10,000 square feet, will be taken over for the purpose, while the museum’s public exhibition program will continue as usual on the second and first floors (once the locked down museum is permitted to reopen). Swiss artist Claudia Comte’s installation of murals will be visible while patients wait for their shots. The artist is also preparing a new audio piece with the vaccination center especially in mind.

Italy was one of the worst-hit countries last spring when the pandemic emerged in Europe. The virus has since claimed 80,000 lives and infected 2.3 million people in the country, and its museums have remained closed since November 4, 2020, as the country has battled back a second wave of infections. From today, the nation is lifting the lockdown for museums in the “yellow” zones of its three-tiered system. The Castello di Rivoli won’t be so lucky quite yet as it is located in an orange zone.

An exhibition by Anne Imhof titled “Sex,” and a group exhibition spanning centuries of various forms of expressionist art, which both are set to open on March 15, will be on view on the floors below the vaccination center.

“Art has always helped, healed and cured—indeed some of the first museums in the world were hospitals,” Christov-Bakargiev continues in her statement. “Our buildings can continue to serve this purpose and fulfil our mission: arte cura—art helps.”

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