Events and Parties

11 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From a Talk With Jordan Casteel to Rashid Johnson at Storm King


Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. In light of the global health crisis, we are currently highlighting events in person and digitally, as well as in-person exhibitions open in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all EST unless otherwise noted.)

 

Monday, April 5

IV Castellanos. Photo by Nina Isabelle.

IV Castellanos. Photo by Nina Isabelle.

1. “Sexual Justice Symposium” at the New School, New York

As part of its 2021 Gender Matters Symposium,  the New School’s Gender & Sexualities Studies Institute is staging a panel on sex, power, and justice with an emphasis on intersectional art and activism. Speakers include artist Christen Clifford, writer Masha Tupitsyn, and curator Jasmine Wahi of the Bronx Museum of Art and Project for Empty Space in Newark. Artists IV Castellanos and Ayana Evans will also perform.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 6 p.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Monday, April 5–Saturday, April 10

2. “Meta vs. Crypto” 

In what seems like an inevitable development, this virtual event is pretty much an NFT art fair, with 30 galleries selling digital art—available for purchase in dollars and cryptocurrency—on the blockchain. Three separate virtual worlds have been built to present work by over 50 artists, with an opening party hosted by Bootsy Collins. Accompanying Clubhouse programming will include a Monday night talk with newly minted NFT legend Beeple, and a Tuesday conversation about crypto art history and the Rare Pepe NFT that made headlines at the first-ever major NFT auction back in 2018 with a then-record $39,000 sale. The event is also accompanied by an NFT debut on MakersPlace featuring street artists from the popular traveling exhibition “Beyond the Streets.”

Price: Free
Time: On view daily at all times

—Sarah Cascone

 

Tuesday, April 6

Jordan Casteel. Photo by David Schulze.

Jordan Casteel. Photo by David Schulze.

3. “Painting Portraits: A Conversation with Jordan Casteel” at the Morgan Library & Museum, New York

As part of the programming for “David Hockney: Drawing from Life” (through May 30), the Morgan presents a conversation about portraiture with Jordan Casteel—known for her stunning large-scale paintings of Black men and women, many of whom she encountered on the street—and Isabelle Dervaux, the museum’s curator of Modern and contemporary drawings.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, April 7

The conversation is part of the Bass's "Curator Culture" series.

The conversation is part of the Bass’s “Curator Culture” series.

4. “Recovering Black History” at the Bass, Miami Beach, and the Studio Museum, Harlem

Performer and Hamilton alumnus Leslie Odom, Jr., musician and author Questlove, and author and editor Jessica Harris will gather together to discuss how their work champions, recontextualizes, and preserves Black narratives. The conversation, which will be held on the Bass Museum’s YouTube Channel, is presented by the Bass and the Studio Museum in Harlem and moderated by the Bass’s own Tom Healy.

Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 6 p.m.

—Julia Halperin

 

Wednesday, April 7–Monday, November 8

Rashid Johnson, <em>The Crisis</em> (2019) installation view at Storm King Art Center, courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Stephanie Powell, courtesy of Storm King Art Center.

Rashid Johnson, The Crisis (2019) installation view at Storm King Art Center, courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Stephanie Powell, courtesy of Storm King Art Center.

5. “Rashid Johnson: The Crisis” at Storm King Art Center, New Windsor, New York

Beloved outdoor sculpture park Storm King opens for the season with Rashid Johnson’s site-specific installation of a 16-foot-tall, yellow pyramidal steel structure titled The Crisis amid a field of native grasses. “When I was making this work in 2019, there was so much talk about a ‘crisis at the border’—but now, in 2021, there is even more at stake,” the artist said in a statement. “The world has endured a year of struggle defined by the global pandemic, compounded by ongoing social unrest. My presentation at Storm King prompts us to reflect on how we move through our own daily lives as the world around us continues in crisis.”

Location: Storm King, 1 Museum Road, New Windsor, New York
Price:
 Per vehicle admission, starting with $20 for one person
Time: Spring hours Wednesday–Monday, 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, April 9

Tracey Robertson Carter, co-chair of Artist In-Residence in Everglades (AIRIE). Photo courtesy of Art Funders Forum.

Tracey Robertson Carter, co-chair of Artist In-Residence in Everglades (AIRIE). Photo courtesy of Art Funders Forum.

6. “Art x Climate Change” at the Art Funders Forum

For the latest event in its “Remake the Model” virtual conversation series, the Art Funder Forum is partnering with EXPO Chicago to answer one of the most pressing questions facing the art world: “How can cultural philanthropy help solve climate change?” Tracey Robertson Carter, co-chair of Artist In-Residence in Everglades (AIRIE), and Sarah Sutton of the Frankenthaler Climate Initiative will speak with Art Funders Forum founders Sean McManus and Melissa Cowley Wolf about how artists are increasing awareness of climate change and helping inspire philanthropists to invest money into fighting it.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 12 p.m. CDT

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday, May 1

Jotham Malavé Maldonado,
El loco (Visiones del Cerro), 2019. Courtesy of REGULAR•NORMAL.

7. “The Privilege of Getting Together” at Anna Zorina, New York

Anna Zorina Gallery is hosting part 2 of Regular Normal’s January group show, “The Privilege of Getting Together.” Curator Danny Baez has organized an amazing line-up of 15 artists, including Danielle de Jesus, Estelle Maisonett, Jotham Malavé Maldonado, and Miguel Payano. Each artist addresses themes of community and relationships in the age of Covid.

Location: Anna Zorina Gallery, 532 W 24th St, New York
Price:
 Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Cristina Cruz

 

Through Sunday, April 25

Daniel T. Gaitor-Lomack, Kings Blue (I’ll Be Seeing You), 2020. Courtesy of Alyssa Davis Gallery.

8. “Daniel T. Gaitor-Lomack: Domesticity Forgotten: The Art of Assemblage ” at Alyssa Davis Gallery, New York

Alyssa Davis Gallery has extended Daniel T. Gaitor-Lomack’s solo show, “Domesticity Forgotten: The Art of Assemblage,” through April 25. The show presents sculptural installations (which the artist calls “conceptual performance assemblages”) and photographs, some of the artist’s performances. You can see more of Gaitor-Lomack’s found-object sculptures at Lyles & King through May 2.

Location: Alyssa Davis Gallery, 2 Cornelia Street, New York
Price:
 Free
Time: By appointment

—Cristina Cruz

 

Saturday, May 8

Emily Marie Miller, Envy in the Wings (2021). Courtesy of Monya Rowe.

Emily Marie Miller, Envy in the Wings (2021). Courtesy of Monya Rowe.

9. “Emily Marie Miller: If I Cannot Bend the Gods Above, Then I Will Move the Infernal Regions” at Monya Rowe, New York

In new large-scale works, painter Emily Marie Miller depicts a fantastical, nighttime world filled only with women in theatrically staged scenarios engaging in various erotic entanglements. Partly inspired by Liz Greene’s 1996 book The Astrological Neptune and the Quest for Redemption, Miller reimagines the Neptunian archetype’s desire to return to a worldly paradise within these images of seeming abandon. The women that populate these scenes appear slightly blurred, as though hazily recalled in a dream, and it seems possible that just one protagonist appears multiplied again and again. Allusions to fairy tales and films reverberate—a reappearing pair of scarlet slippers bring to mind the 1948 technicolor film The Red Shoes, while the stage-like interior scenes call to mind choreographed ballets, particularly Giselle. Humming with dark blues and burning reds, the paintings are a kind of one-woman burlesque, performed primarily for oneself and to delightfully lurid effect. 

Location: Monya Rowe, 224 West 30th Street, #1005,  New York
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.– 6 p.m.

—Katie White

 

Through Sunday, May 16

Nicholas Galanin, <i>Never Forget</i>. North of the Palm Springs Visitors Center at Tramway Road. Courtesy Desert X.

Nicholas Galanin, Never Forget. North of the Palm Springs Visitors Center at Tramway Road. Courtesy Desert X.

10. “Desert X 2021” at various locations, Coachella Valley, California

The latest edition of this sprawling mega-show, which takes place in the great outdoors of the Coachella Valley in California, picks up where the latest editions left off. The show is organized by Desert X artistic director Neville Wakefield and co-curator César García-Alvarez and includes works by artists such as Nicholas Galanin, whose Hollywood-like sign reminds viewers about whose land it really is; Judy Chicago, whose fireworks offer a stunning and colorful display; and Alicja Kwade, whose powerful, sometimes difficult works combine industrial materials with biomorphic forms. Timed tickets can be reserved for those who are interested.

Location: Various locations, Coachella Valley, California
Price: Free
Time: Sunrise to sunset, Monday through Sunday

—Nan Stewert

 

Through Sunday, July 11

Lillian Bassman, A Report to Skeptics, Suzy Parker, April 1952, Harper’s Bazaar. Gelatin silver print. Collection of Eric and Lizzie Himmel, New York. © Estate of Lillian Bassman. Image via The Jewish Museum.

11. “Modern Look: Photography and the American Magazine” at the Jewish Museum, New  York

Dive into the world of the mid-century American magazine with the Jewish Museum’s latest show honoring the legacy of postwar avant-garde design. As artists and designers were forced out of Europe during the war, many of them landed in America, bringing with them an “unmistakable aesthetic” that marked the pages of magazines like Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue. Featuring photographs, layouts, covers, and more from the archives of designers and photographers like Richard Avedon, Lillian Bassman, Margaret Bourke-White, Gordon Parks, and Paul Rand, the show shapes up to be a print lover’s dream.

Location: The Jewish Museum, 1109 5th Ave, New York
Price: $18 for adults
Time: Monday 11 a.m.–4 p.m., Thursday 11 a.m–8 p.m., Friday–Sunday 11 a.m.–4 p.m.

—Katie Rothstein

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11 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From Julie Mehretu at the Whitney to Alteronce Gumby in Two Boroughs


Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. In light of the global health crisis, we are currently highlighting events in person and digitally, as well as in-person exhibitions open in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all EST unless otherwise noted.)

 

Tuesday, March 23

"Women, Power & Promise: A Convening" at the Newark Museum of Art, featuring the Guerrilla Girls and Bobbi Brown.

“Women, Power & Promise: A Convening” at the Newark Museum of Art, featuring the Guerrilla Girls and Bobbi Brown.

1. “Women, Power, and Promise” at the Newark Museum of Art

The Newark Museum has put together a slate of programs for this Women’s History Month event, with a keynote address by cosmetics mogul Bobbi Brown, an art performance by the Guerrilla Girls, and closing remarks from Lisa Kaplowitz, executive director of the Center for Women in Business at Rutgers Business School.

Price: $50 general admission
Time: 3 p.m.–5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Dawoud Bey, <em>Taylor Falls and Deborah Hackworth</em> from “The Birmingham Project” (2012). Photo courtesy of the artist and Stephen Daiter Gallery.

Dawoud Bey, Taylor Falls and Deborah Hackworth from “The Birmingham Project” (2012). Photo courtesy of the artist and Stephen Daiter Gallery.

2. “Dawoud Bey in Conversation With Gary Carrion-Murayari” at the New Museum, New York

As part of a conversation series held in conjunction with the museum’s new exhibition, “Grief and Grievance: Art and Mourning in America” (through June 6), artist Dawoud Bey will speak with curator Gary Carrion-Murayari. His work in the show, The Birmingham Project (2012), memorializes the six young African Americans killed in the September 15, 1963, 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 4 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, March 24

Ronnie Goodman, <em>San Quentin Arts in Corrections Art Studio</em> (2008), detail. Collection of Prison Arts Project, William James Association.

Ronnie Goodman, San Quentin Arts in Corrections Art Studio (2008), detail. Collection of Prison Arts Project, William James Association.

3. “Honoring Ronnie Goodman” at MoMA PS1, Queens

As the museum winds down “Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration” (through April 5), MoMA PS1 pays tribute to Ronnie Goodman, who died last year. A self-taught artist, Goodman rediscovered his talents as a painter through the Arts in Corrections Program at San Quentin State Prison, making work that critiqued mass incarceration even after his release from jail. The virtual program will feature a new short film with rare footage of the artist and a talk by Nicole Fleetwood about his life and career.

Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 6:30 p.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, March 24–Saturday, May 1

Roxanne Jackson, <em>Black Flame</em> 2019). Photo courtesy of Dinner Gallery.

Roxanne Jackson, Black Flame 2019). Photo courtesy of Dinner Gallery.

4. “Magic Touch” at Dinner Gallery, New York

Jen Dwyer, who had an excellent showing of her feminist ceramic sculptures at Spring/Break New York just over a year ago, takes a turn as guest curator for this group show with an exciting line-up of artists including Faith Ringgold, Aminah Robinson, and Sophia Narrett, among others. The exhibition’s title is a reference to the handmade qualities of the works on view, inspired by the tactile experience of pushing and pulling clay in  Dwyer’s own practice, as well as the desire for physical connection after a year of isolation.

Location: Dinner Gallery, 242 West 22nd Street, New York
Price: Free
Time: By appointment

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, March 25

The passage of a cruise ship in the St. Mark’s Basin in Venice, Italy. (2014). Photo by: Delfino Sisto Legnani/World Monuments Fund Image courtesy Fondazione Venezia 2000

The passage of a cruise ship in the St. Mark’s Basin in Venice, Italy. Photo by: Delfino Sisto Legnani/World Monuments Fund Image courtesy Fondazione Venezia 2000

5. “When Will We Return to Venice and Should We?” Hosted by World Monuments Fund

When the pandemic brought tourism in Venice to a halt last year, it dealt a serious blow to the city’s economy but simultaneously provided a respite from the year-round throng of visitors and tourists. In this virtual discussion, WMF President and CEO Bénédicte de Montlaur will be joined by guest speakers Jane da Mosto (environmental scientist and founding president of We are here Venice) and visual artists Tomás Saraceno and David Landau to discuss these issues and others.

Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 12 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Thursday, March 25–Sunday, August 8

Julie Mehretu,<eM> Conjured Parts (eye). Ferguson, 2016</em>. Photo by Cathy Carver, courtesy of the Broad Art Foundation, Los Angeles, ©Julie Mehretu.

Julie Mehretu, Conjured Parts (eye). Ferguson, 2016. Photo by Cathy Carver, courtesy of the Broad Art Foundation, Los Angeles, ©Julie Mehretu.

6. “Julie Mehretu” at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

This mid-career survey of Julie Mehretu originated at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, which co-organized the show with the Whitney. It features some 30 paintings—some mammoth-sized—as well as works of paper, and showcases the artist’s ability to speak to such fraught issues as history, colonialism, capitalism, geopolitics, and war in largely abstract works.

Location: Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street
Price:
 $25 general admission
Time: Monday, 10:30 a.m.–5 p.m.; Thursday and Friday, 10:30 a.m.–6 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday 11:30 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Wednesday, March 31

Suejin Jo, <em>Prayer Rock<em> (2020). Photo courtesy of the New York Society of Women Artists.

Suejin Jo, Prayer Rock (2020). Photo courtesy of the New York Society of Women Artists.

7. “Women on the Edge of of Time” at Taller Boricua Gallery, New York

The New York Society of Women Artists, founded in 1925, is marking Women’s History Month with a virtual exhibition that considers its nearly century-long history, and the ways in which its founding concerns remain at the fore to this day. The 36 participating artists in this show also address pressing social issues such as immigration and LGTBQ rights. See the artworks and read the artist statements on the gallery’s virtual viewing room, and watch YouTube videos from each women about their work on the society’s website.

Price: Free
Time: On view daily at all times

—Nan Stewert

 

Through Sunday, April 11

Destiny Belgrave, Blooming Sprout, 2021 Courtesy of Deanna Evans Projects

8. “Destiny Belgrave: Birthright” at Deanna Evans Projects, Brooklyn

Deanna Evans Projects presents a solo show by Brooklyn-based artist Destiny Belgrave as its second exhibition. The show consists entirely of works on paper and highlights the importance of matriarchs in the artist’s life through paper cutouts, floral imagery, and poetry. The figures are women in Belgrave’s life, including her mother, sister, and herself and the show is a deeply personal exploration of the themes of youth, birth, and bonding.

Location: Deanna Evans Projects, 1329 Willoughby Avenue, #171 E, Brooklyn
Price:
 Free
Time: By appointment only

—Neha Jambhekar

 

 

Through Sunday, April 25 

Installation view "Somewhere Under the Rainbow / The Sky is Blue and What am I Glass am I" (2021). Courtesy of False Flag.

Installation view “Somewhere Under the Rainbow / The Sky is Blue and What am I Glass am I” (2021). Courtesy of False Flag.

9.”Alteronce Gumby: Somewhere Under the Rainbow/The Sky is Blue and What am I Glass am I” at Charles Moffett and False Flag

Sixteen of Alteronce Gumby’s new color-centric abstractions are currently on view in a two-part exhibition split between Charles Moffett in Manhattan and False Flag in Long Island City. At Charles Moffett, visitors will find a selection of Gumby’s visually dazzling gemstone-filled works on panel—lapis lazuli, ruby, amethyst, rose quartz, lemon quartz, fluorite, black tourmaline, and citrine are integrated into his painted glass panels and sealed with acrylic. The exhibition at False Flag, meanwhile, is anchored by a 24-foot-long, six-panel canvas work that, in various shades of blue, considers our relationship to the sky. While rooted in this history of Abstract Expressionism, Gumby’s abstractions, with their seemingly infinite variations of color, consider how light, physics, and natural materials can be contextualized into conversations about race and spirituality. 

Location:  Charles Moffett, 511 Canal Street #200/Buzzer 3; False Flag, 11-22 44th Road Long Island City
Price: Free
Time: Charles Moffett is open by appointment, Thursday–Sunday; False Flag is open by appointment, Friday–Sunday

—Katie White

 

Through Wednesday, September 1

Chris Bogia, The Sun, The City, 2021. Courtesy the artist and Mrs. Photo by Marcie Revens.

Chris Bogia, The Sun, The City, 2021. Courtesy the artist and Mrs. Photo by Marcie Revens.

10. “Chris Bogia: The Sun, the City” and “Jade Yumang: Open House Spatter” from Time Equities Inc. and Art-in-Buildings

A new installation in Lower Manhattan provides a safe, socially distanced way to see art… and one that suggests a day when we will no longer have to socially distance, no less. New York artist Chris Bogia’s The Sun, The City (2021) consists of a radiant, 15-foot-wide mandala hanging on the wall of the lobby at 125 Maiden Lane, shining down on a geometric cityscape. The artist describes the work as having “nostalgic references to groovier times,” and the work is visible from the street, if you don’t want to venture indoors. If you do, though, you’ll also get to experience Jade Yumang’s Open House Spatter (2021), in which he investigates queer histories through design metaphors.

Location: 125 Maiden Lane, New York
Price:
Free
Time: On view daily at all times

—Brian Boucher

 

Through Sunday, September 26

Artist: Collective Magpie; Courtesy of El Museo del Barrio

11. “Estamos Bien: La Trienal 20/21” at El Museo del Barrio, New York

Currently in Harlem’s El Museo del Barrio is a survey of more than 40 established and emerging Latinx contemporary artists from across the diaspora of the United States and Puerto Rico. The exhibition includes a diverse range of subject matters and meda media, resonating with the complexities of identity in the Latinx community. Exhibited artists include Francis Almendárez, Luis Flores, Manuela González, xime izquierdo ugaz, Poncili Creación, Yelaine Rodriguez, and Raelis Vasquez, among others.

Location: El Museo del Barrio, 1230 5th Avenue, New York
Price:
 Suggested admission $9
Time: Saturday and Sunday, 12 p.m.–5 p.m.

—Cristina Cruz

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15 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From Wikipedia Edit-a-Thons to a Virtual Visit With Kenny Scharf


Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. In light of the global health crisis, we are currently highlighting events in person and digitally, as well as in-person exhibitions open in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all EST unless otherwise noted.)

 

Tuesday, March 2

Ja'Tovia Gary, THE GIVERNY SUITE, detail (2019). © Ja’Tovia Gary. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York. Photo: Steven Probert.

Ja’Tovia Gary, THE GIVERNY SUITE, detail (2019). © Ja’Tovia Gary. Courtesy of Paula Cooper Gallery, New York. Photo: Steven Probert.

1. “When Did Video Become Art? On Surveillance” at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

If you’re looking for a compact primer on how video moved from its origins in TV broadcasts and security cameras into the art-historical canon, then tune in to the next edition of the Whitney’s ongoing “Art History From Home” series. This week, artist, author, and lecturer Ayanna Dozier will use vital works by the likes of Andrea Fraser, Ja’Tovia Gary, Jill Magid, and others to walk viewers through video art’s complex relationship to our contemporary surveillance state, as well as how artists can use the medium to short-circuit the intrusive machinic gaze we now live under.

Price: Free with registration

Time: 6 p.m. 

—Tim Schneider

 

Kenny Scharf's Los Angeles studio. Photo courtesy of Kenny Scharf Studio.

Kenny Scharf’s Los Angeles studio. Photo courtesy of Kenny Scharf Studio.

2. “Kenny Scharf Virtual Visit” at RxART, New York

RxArt members can tune in for this virtual studio with Kenny Scharf, who will talk about projects such as his mural in the stairwell of the pediatric and adolescent psychiatric units at Kings County Hospital in Brooklyn. The street artist-turned-blue-chip darling will chat with dealer David Totah—tuning in from Scharf’s permanent FUNUNDERWORLD installation at his New York gallery—and RxArt founder Diane Brown.

Price: Free for Friends of RxART (membership is $100)
Time: 1 p.m.

—Tanner West 

 

Wednesday, March 3

Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw, associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania

Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw, associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania.

3. “The Modern Portrait” hosted by the Philadelphia Show

As part of a monthly series, “New Conversations with the  Philadelphia Show,” University of Pennsylvania associate professor Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw and Philadelphia Museum of Art curator Jessica T. Smith highlight how 15 artists used portraiture to frame their perception of people and experiment with techniques, as well as to reflect on social issues.

Price: Free with registration.
Time: 5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Courtesy of the Helsinki Biennial.

Courtesy of the Helsinki Biennial.

4. “Helsinki Biennial Talks – Lecture by Dr. Paul O’Neill: The Biennial Impact” at the Helsinki Biennial

Irish curator, artist, writer, and educator Paul O’Neill will take a look at the worldwide proliferation of the art biennial over the past 20 years, with an eye toward covering “everything you wanted to know but were afraid to ask” in the first virtual program for the inaugural Helsinki Biennial.

Price: Free
Time: 9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

—Tanner West 

 

Mildred Thomas, <em> Construction </em> (c. 1973). Courtesy of Galerie Lelong.

Mildred Thomas, Construction (c. 1973). Courtesy of Galerie Lelong.

5. “Dialogues – Expanding the Legacy of Mildred Thompson” at Galerie Lelong, New York

In conjunction with its second solo exhibition of Mildred Thompson—a previously overlooked Black artist of the  Modernist era—”Throughlines, Assemblages and Works on Paper from the 1960s to the 1990s,” Galerie Lelong hosts the second event in its new “Dialogues” series, moderated by Melissa Messina, curator of the artist’s estate. The speakers include artist A’Driane Nieves, founder of Philadelphia’s Tessera Arts Collective, and Lauren Jackson Harris and Daricia Mia DeMarr, founders of Black Women in Visual Art.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 2 p.m.–3 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, March 4

Image courtesy of The Shed. Clockwise from top left: Howardena Pindell, Heather Hart, Shani Peters, Tiona Nekkia McClodden. Photos: Nathan Keay; Heather Hart; Texas Isaiah; Chanel Matsunami Govreau.

6. “Pindell’s Legacy: Artists/Activists/Educators” hosted by the Shed

This is your last chance to catch an installment of “Pindell’s Legacy,” a series of online talks exploring the work of artist Howardena Pindell. The talk, moderated by The Shed assistant curator Adeze Wilford, will feature Pindell alongside interdisciplinary artists Heather Hart, Shani Peters, and Tiona Nekkia McClodden. “Pindell’s Legacy” has run in tandem with “Howardena Pindell: Rope/Fire/Water,” a video project by the artist that was unrealized since the 1970s. Through a mix of personal anecdotes and historical data, Pindell’s first video in over 25 years explores racism, the history of lynching in the US, and the healing power of art. If you’re in the New York area, you can catch the show in-person at The Shed through March 28.

Price: Free with registration.
Time: 6:30 p.m.

—Katie Rothstein

 

Courtesy of a Blade of Grass

Courtesy of A Blade of Grass.

7. “Making Change Now: Contextualizing Cancel Culture, Hyper-Partisanship, and the Politics of Progress” at a Blade of Grass, New  York

After an organizational restructuring that winnowed the staff of A Blade of Grass to just one—director Deborah Fisher—the nonprofit kicks off its new season of programming with community organizer and cultural worker Scot Nakagawa and racial justice and human rights expert Loretta J. Ross. The two will discuss the influence of the media and the ways in which it helps drive partisan divisions within society, and how people’s consumption of media shapes their beliefs.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Sandhya Kochar. Photo courtesy of Sandhya Kochar. Torkwase Dyson. Photo by Gabe Souza. Ann Hamliton. Photo by Calista Lyon.

Sandhya Kochar, Torkwase Dyson, Ann Hamilton. Photos by Gabe Souza and Calista Lyon.

8. “Torkwase Dyson in Conversation with Ann Hamilton and Sandhya Kochar” at the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio

The Wexner continues its “Diversities in Practice” talk series with Torkwase Dyson, the museum’s residency award recipient, who will speak about her work with Ohio State art professor Ann Hamilton and architecture lecturer Sandhya Kochar.

Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

George Mumford. Nadia Hallgren. Photo by JJ Medina.

George Mumford, Nadia Hallgren. Photo by JJ Medina.

9. “Lens Mix 4: Nadia Hallgren and George Mumford” at FotoFocus, Cincinnati

FotoFocus’s LensMix conversation series returns with filmmaker Nadia Hallgren and sports coach George Mumford, who will discuss overcoming professional boundaries facing African Americans to work with the likes of Michelle Obama and Kobe Bryant.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 6 p.m.

—Nan Stewert

Thursday, March 4–Sunday, March 14

Sophie Kahn, <em>The Divers VI</em>. Courtesy of the artist.

Sophie Kahn, The Divers VI. Courtesy of the artist.

10. “Sophie Kahn: Dematerialized” on Mozilla Hubs

Nearly a year after lockdown cancelled her exhibition “Dematerialized” at the School of Visual Arts in New York, Sophie Kahn is finally debuting the show, albeit in dramatically altered form, staged in the world of VR. The artist has recreated both the physical space and the works themselves, which were 3-D printed sculptures based on scans of live models in different poses. You can book a virtual tour where Kahn will guide your avatar through the interactive 3-D experience, in which sculptures expand and levitate off their pedestals as you approach. (A VR headset is recommended, but optional, to experience the show.)

Price: Free with registration
Time: Opening, 6:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m., and by virtual appointment

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, March  5

Illustration by franzidraws. Courtesy of the Design Museum Everywhere.

Illustration by franzidraws. Courtesy of the Design Museum Everywhere.

11. “Design’s Role in Equity: Diversity in Action Preview Workshop” at the Design Museum Everywhere, Boston

The Design Museum Everywhere is hosting a free workshop to preview its “Diversity in Action” training program, a three-month course hosted by its director of learning and interpretation, Diana Navarrete-Rackauckas with the aim of illustrating the role design plays in equity.

Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 1 p.m.–2 p.m.

—Nan Stewert

 

Through Saturday, March 6

"Joyce Pensato: Fuggetabout It (Redux)" installation view (2021). Photo courtesy of Petzel.

“Joyce Pensato: Fuggetabout It (Redux),” installation view (2021). Photo courtesy of Petzel.

12. “Joyce Pensato Fuggetabout It (Redux)” at Petzel, New York

In 2011, Joyce Pensato was evicted from her East Williamsburg studio after 32 years. She turned her legal defeat into art, staging a critically acclaimed exhibition at Petzel featuring hundreds of paint-splattered objects from her former workspace. She showed the installation in two other iterations during her lifetime; now, her estate has worked with the gallery to stage a “Redux” version, accompanied by the late artists’s “eyeball” paintings, based on characters such as Elmo and Felix the Cat.

Location: Petzel, 456 West 18th Street, New York
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Saturday, March 6

Guests at the Wikipedia Edit-a-thon: Art + Feminism at MoMA. Photo by Manuel Molina Martagon, courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.

Guests at the Wikipedia Edit-a-thon: Art + Feminism at MoMA. Photo by Manuel Molina Martagon, courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.

13. “The Met x Wikipedia Virtual Edit Meet-up: Women’s History Month” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

The Met is one of 57 institutions around the world holding an Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon for Women’s History Month. Edit-a-thons look to add information about women artists to the free online encyclopedia to boost efforts to bridge the gender gap in the art world. The Wikimedia NYC chapter will provide lists of artists and artworks, as well as training on editing and creating articles. Tune in on Facebook or YouTube to watch, or sign up on the Wikipedia Meetup page.

Price: Free
Time: 12:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday, March 27

Jordan Kasey, Storm, 2020 Courtesy of Nicelle Beauchene Gallery

14. “Jordan Kasey: The Storm” at Nicelle Beauchene Gallery, New York City

Nicelle Beauchene Gallery presents “The Storm,” Jordan Kasey’s third solo show with the gallery. The show consists of eight new large-scale paintings with the artist’s signature figures that take up the entirety of the surface. The paintings depict slices of loneliness: a solo man with an umbrella, a figure lit up with lightning, which leaves the viewer to wonder if the storm is literal internal. Light and shadow is used to create the feeling that something is looming just out of view, giving each work a surreal, dreamlike quality.

Location: Nicelle Beauchene Gallery, 7 Franklin Place, New York
Price:
 Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Neha Jambhekar

 

Through Saturday, March 20 

Installation view "Eric Standley: Songs for the Living," 2020. Courtesy of Dinner Gallery.

Installation view “Eric Standley: Songs for the Living,” 2020. Courtesy of Dinner Gallery.

15. “Eric Standley: Songs for the Living” at Dinner Gallery

Made of scrupulously arranged layers of multicolor laser-cut paper, Eric Standley’s intricate works bring to mind mandalas, Gothic architectural webs, and the delicate carvings common to Islamic prayer niches. Though newly made, Standley calls the work artifacts because, for him, the act of assembling them is akin to an act of discovering—as though the forms already exist out in the world, and he has happened upon them. Set against bright, geometric forms painted onto the gallery walls, the exhibition has the feel of a sanctum, a place with reverence for complexity, study, and moments of peaceful contemplation.

Location: Dinner Gallery, 242 West 22nd Street, New York
Price: Free
Time: By appointment, Tuesday–Saturday

—Katie White

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15 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From Printed Matter’s Virtual Art-Book Fair to Amy Sedaris Impersonating Marcel Dzama


Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. In light of the global health crisis, we are currently highlighting events in person and digitally, as well as in-person exhibitions open in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all EST unless otherwise noted.)

 

Tuesday, February 23–Thursday, February 25

Amy Sedaris in character as Marcel Dzama. Photo courtesy of Marcel Dzama.

Amy Sedaris in character as Marcel Dzama. Photo courtesy of Marcel Dzama.

1. “SCAD deFINE ART” at the Savannah College of Art and Design

This year’s SCAD deFINE ART exhibition and talk program, which honors artist Sanford Biggers, goes virtual, kicking off with a conversation between comedian Amy Sedaris and artist Marcel Dzama on Tuesday at 11 a.m. (Sedaris will appear in character as the artist). Other highlights include a talk with the Haas Brothers and their dealer, Marianne Boesky, on Thursday at 2 p.m., and Biggers’s keynote lecture on Wednesday at 6 p.m.

Price: Free with registration
Time: Various times

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, February 24

Ashley Southall, Thomas Abt, and Erica Ford. Courtesy of the Museum of the City of New York.

Ashley Southall, Thomas Abt, and Erica Ford. Courtesy of the Museum of the City of New York.

2. “Envisioning Alternatives to Policing: Violence Prevention” at the Museum of the City of New York

Ashley Southall of the New York Times is leading a trio of virtual events about how activists are working to keep their communities safe without engaging the police. The first panel features Thomas Abt, author of Bleeding Out: The Devastating Consequences of Urban Violence—and a Bold New Plan for Peace in the Streets, and Erica Ford, CEO and co-founder of LIFE Camp, a Queens-based gun violence prevention organization.

Price: $20 suggested donation
Time: 7 p.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, February 24–Saturday, February 27

Adriana Varejão. Photo by Vicente de Mello, courtesy the artist and Gagosian.

Adriana Varejão. Photo by Vicente de Mello, courtesy the artist and Gagosian.

3. “Artist Spotlight: Adriana Varejão” at Gagosian, New York

Gagosian continues its weekly Spotlight series, highlighting one work from one artist, with Brazilian artist Adriana Varejão, ahead of her May show at the gallery’s 522 West 21st Street location. On Wednesday, the gallery is releasing a new time-lapse video of the artist creating one of her tile paintings, inspired by the Portuguese art of azulejo, traditional glazed terracotta tiles brought to Brazil in colonial times. The new work will be unveiled on Friday, available for sale for only 48 hours.

Price: Free

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, February 24–Sunday, February 28

Printed Matter's Virtual Art Book Fair. Image courtesy of Printed Matter, Inc.

Printed Matter’s Virtual Art Book Fair. Image courtesy of Printed Matter, Inc.

4. “Printed Matter’s Virtual Art Book Fair” at Printed Matter, Inc., New York

As it celebrates the 15th anniversary of its first New York Art Book Fair, Printed Matter enters the world of virtual fairs with a robust slate of more than 400 exhibitors from more than 40 countries, plus digital programming including lectures, conversations, performances, and the 2021 Contemporary Artists’ Book Conference. Each dealer in the fair will have his or her own custom website featuring books for sale, as well as extra content including videos from artists and panel discussions.

Price: Free with registration
Time: Opening Wednesday 4 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, February 25

Cover, Hari Ziyad, Black Boy Out of Time. Courtesy of the author.

Cover, Hari Ziyad, Black Boy Out of Time. Courtesy of the author.

5. “Virtual Book Launch: Black Boy Out of Time with Hari Ziyad and Kiese Laymon” at the Brooklyn Museum

If you’ve seen promo imagery for the Brooklyn Museum’s stirring exhibition “John Edmonds: A Sidelong Glance,” then you’ve already seen a masked yet still vulnerable Hari Ziyad in the photograph Two Spirits (2019)That title nods toward a theme of both Edmonds’s show and Ziyad’s new memoir, which details the author’s coming of age as Black and queer in the American midwest. To celebrate the release of Black Boy Out of Time, Ziyad will talk through intersectional challenges including race, gender, and institutionalized violence with the award-winning author Kiese Laymon, whose own recent book, Heavy: An American Memoir, was named one of the 50 best memoirs of the past 50 years by the New York Times.

Price: $10 (Free for members)
Time: 6 p.m.–7 p.m.

—Tim Schneider

 

Theaster Gates, <em>Gone Are the Days of Shelter and Martyr</em> (2014), video still. Photo ©Theaster Gates, courtesy White Cube and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

Theaster Gates, Gone Are the Days of Shelter and Martyr (2014), video still. Photo ©Theaster Gates, courtesy of White Cube and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

6. “Theaster Gates in Conversation with Massimiliano Gioni” at the New Museum, New York

In the first program for the New Museum’s new showGrief and Grievance: Art and Mourning in America,” the museum’s artistic director, Massimiliano Gioni, will talk on Zoom with artist Theaster Gates about his work revitalizing Black communities.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 4 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Photo courtesy of the Thurgood Academy Lower School, New York.

Photo courtesy of the Thurgood Academy Lower School, New York.

7. “Educator Activism: Social Justice, Antiracist Education, and Cultural Responsiveness” at the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Dawn Brooks-DeCosta, principle of New York City’s Thurgood Marshall Academy Lower School, leads this webinar on teaching within the framework of social justice and anti-racism.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Paul Cadmus, <em>Playground</em>. (1947). Courtesy of the Georgia Museum of Art.

Paul Cadmus, Playground. (1947). Courtesy of the Georgia Museum of Art.

8. “Lecture: Philip Eliasoph: “‘Hide-and-Seek’ on the Magic Realists’ Playground: Unmasking ‘Extraordinary’ Metaphors’” at the Georgia Museum of Art, Athens

American art historian, critic, curator, and Fairfield University art history professor Philip Eliasoph will unlock the layers of meaning in Paul Cadmus’s 1947 masterpiece Playground in this virtual lecture at the Georgia Museum, where the painting is on view in “Extra Ordinary: Magic, Mystery, and Imagination in American Art” (through June 13).

Price: Free with registration
Time: 4 p.m.–4 p.m.

—Nan Stewert

 

Friday, February 26

Marcus Samuelsson. Photo by Mike Schwar.

Marcus Samuelsson. Photo by Mike Schwar.

9. “Cooking With Adrienne Cheatham, Marcus Samuelsson, and David Breslin” at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

David Breslin, the Whitney Museum’s director of curatorial initiatives and curator, will talk with chefs Marcus Samuelsson and Adrienne Cheatham about ties between Black chefs and Black artists while the two prepare a meal.

Price: Free for members (starting at $90 for the year)
Time: 5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, February 26—Saturday, March 27

"David

10. “David Goldblatt: Strange Instrument” at Pace Gallery, New York

This show of more than 60 vintage prints by South African master David Goldblatt, who documented life at the height of apartheid between, the late ’60s and early ’80s, was curated by artist and activist Zanele Muholi in collaboration with her gallery, Yancey Richardson. Goldblatt, who died in 2018, was a mentor and friend to the artist. The curated group of images reflects Muholi’s own meditation on the brutality that Goldblatt captured in scenes of everyday life under conditions of extreme injustice. Muholi, who is an acclaimed photographer in her own right, has been creating self-portraits in various locations throughout the world as a means of addressing issues of race, gender, personal history, and African political history. She currently has a solo exhibition at the Tate.

Location: Pace Gallery, 540 West 25th Street, New York
Price:
 Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m., by appointment

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Friday, February 26–Saturday, April 10

Lucas Blalock, Reverse Titanic / Hell is in the Air, 2019 © Lucas Blalock. Courtesy of Galerie Eva Presenhuber.

11. “Lucas Blalock: Florida, 1989” at Galerie Eva Presenhuberbi, New York

As the title of the show states, contemporary photographer Lucas Blalock has a unique memory of Florida in 1989: It was there and then that a freak accident at Disney World led a 10-year-old Blalock to lose his thumb. In turn, his missing finger was surgically replaced with his big toe—an experimental procedure at the time, but one that ultimately allowed him to retain full and normal use of his hand. Much of Blalock’s work grapples implicitly with the psychological trauma of the event, but this exhibition marks the first time he has attempted to explore it directly through photoshopped collages and “remixed” portraits.

Location: Galerie Eva Presenhuber, 39 Great Jones Street, New York
Price: Free
Time: Opening, 11 a.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 11  a.m.–6 p.m.

—Katie Rothstein

 

Friday, February 26—Saturday, May 1

Amanda Ba, My Beast, All Mine (2021). Courtesy Tong Art Advisory.

12. “QUEER OUT T/HERE” at Tong Art Advisory, New York 

This past summer, pop-up blue-chip galleries descended on Long Island vacation towns to cater to the now-permanent residents who declined to return to the city. But there were also some scrappier endeavors happening out East. In September, Tong Art Advisory set up a show in an unusual space: a series of garages in a field on the rough-hewn road that winds out toward Springs. It became a hit show of the late season in the Hamptons, featuring work by in-demand artists such as Alex Becerra, Caitlin Keough, Chelsea Culprit, Nevine Mahmoud, and Van Hanos.

Now, Tong Art Advisory, which was founded by Yitong Wang in 2019, will stage another show, this time back in Manhattan. “QUEER OUT T/HERE,” a group exhibition curated in collaboration with artist Oscar yi Hou, will “examine the condition of ‘otherness’ across overlapping lines of queerness and/or East Asian identity,” according to a press release. Nine artists feature in the show: Amanda Ba, Dominique Fung, Kenneth Tam, Lily Wong, Louis Fratino, Martin Wong, Oscar yi Hou, Paul Sepyua, and Tseng Kwong Chi

And, once again, it’s in an intriguing location. QUEER OUT T/HERE will be staged in a hush-hush spot in Soho, on one of the tony nabe’s most cherished blocks, in one of those spaces that you known exist somewhere inside the grid of cast-iron buildings but can’t see from the street. Reach out about an appointment if you want to know more.

Location: The secret Tong Art Advisory HQ in Soho, email [email protected] for more info
Price: Free
Time: By appointment

Nate Freeman

 

Through Thursday, March 18

Linjie Deng,<i>Moon Catcher</i> (2020). Image courtesy the artist and Carlton Fine Arts.

Linjie Deng,Moon Catcher (2020). Image courtesy of the artist and Carlton Fine Arts.

13. “Linjie Deng: Lost Museum” at Carlton Fine Arts, New York

Linjie Deng is a 29-year old artist who has been based in New York since graduating from art school in Beijing six years ago. He began studying Chinese ink art since the age of six, a practice which is reflected in his appreciation for multimedia, participatory, and performance art. Works like Moon Catcher (2020), reflect his love of classic Chinese poetry and symbolism. Deng says the moon follows you wherever you are in the world and serves as a reminder of where you first encountered it in your hometown—which, for him, is a village in the northwestern Shanxi Province.

Location: Carlton Fine Arts, 543 Madison Avenue, New York
Price: Free
Time: Monday–Thursday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Friday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.; and by appointment

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Through Friday, March 12

LeRone Wilson, <em>Nieth</em> (2020). Photo courtesy of Bill Hodges Gallery, New York.

LeRone Wilson, Nieth (2020). Photo courtesy of Bill Hodges Gallery, New York.

14. “LeRone Wilson: From Beyond” at Bill Hodges Gallery, New York

LeRone Wilson’s unique brand of encaustic art bridges the gap between painting and sculpture with “sculptural paintings” made from textured layers of beeswax, carnauba wax, and propolis—a resin-like material produced by bees—mixed with powdered pigment and molded with a pallet knife. The artist considers his work with beeswax an extension of his studies of Kemetism, a revival of ancient Egyptian religion that looks to reclaim historical Black identity, because of the importance of honey and bees to the Egyptians.

Location: Bill Hodges Gallery, 529 West 20th Street, 10E, New York
Price: Free
Time: Monday–Friday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday, March 27 

Gretchen Scherer, Doria Pamphilj (2021). Courtesy of Monya Rowe Gallery.

Gretchen Scherer, Doria Pamphilj (2021). Courtesy of Monya Rowe Gallery.

15. “Dual Hearts and Empty Halls: Anne Buckwalter and Gretchen Scherer” at Monya Rowe Gallery, New York

In this two-person exhibition, artists Anne Buckwalter and Gretchen Scherer present new paintings that hint vividly at the oddness of our current times. Scherer paints lushly intricate interiors of museum halls glutted with paintings, but absent of people. Buckwalter, meanwhile, creates domestic scenes that combine elements of the artist’s own life with imagined subject matter. Both artists’ works come alive through their sensitivity to detail. Scherer lovingly reimagines museum and private collections using information culled from internet searches and books to create fictitious salon-style installations of her favorite artworks in these collections. Anne Buckwalter, meanwhile, adds proactively intimate details—figures entwined on a floor beside a teddy bear, scraps of paper with private doodles, a chipped Zabar’s mug—to her scenes of daily life. These are paintings that reward close looking and allow the mind to conjure up endless possible narratives.

Location: Monya Rowe Gallery,  224 West 30th Street #1005,  New York
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Katie White

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11 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From a Talk About the Future of Museums to Three Shows at Bortolami


Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. In light of the global health crisis, we are currently highlighting events and digitally, as well as in-person exhibitions open in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all EST unless otherwise noted.)

 

Tuesday, January 12

Installation view of "Lin Tianmiao: Protruding Patterns" at Galerie Lelong, New York, in 2017. Image courtesy Galerie Lelong.

Installation view of “Lin Tianmiao: Protruding Patterns” at Galerie Lelong, New York, in 2017. Image courtesy Galerie Lelong.

1. “Meet the Artist: Lin Tianmiao on Public Art In China” at the China Institute, New York

This Zoom conversation between artist Lin Tianmiao and art writer Barbara Pollack is organized by the China Institute and shared by Galerie Lelong. The discussion will focus at Lin’s new post-feminist work and the rise of large-scale public art projects in China. The artist is known her embroidered objects that explore gender roles in modern-day society. New works also explore themes of time and loss.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 8 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Wednesday, January 13

Danielle Scott. Photo courtesy of the Newark Museum.

Danielle Scott. Photo courtesy of the Newark Museum.

2. “Studio Snapshots: Danielle Scott” at the Newark Museum of Art

The Newark Museum has launched a video series spotlighting local artists and their work during the past year in lockdown. The second video, featuring Danielle Scott—a full-time art teacher making work inspired by the current state of affairs for Black men in the US—will be released this week on the museum’s Facebook page.

Price: Free
Time: 12 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, January 14

András Szántó, The Future of the Museum: 28 Dialogues. Photo courtesy of the author.

András Szántó, The Future of the Museum: 28 Dialogues. Photo courtesy of the author.

3. “Virtual Roundtable: The Future of the Museum” at the Brooklyn Museum 

On the occasion of the publication of museum strategist András Szántó’s new book, The Future of the Museum: 28 Dialogues, the author will speak with Sandra Jackson-Dumont, director of the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art in Los Angeles, and Marie-Cécile Zinsou, president and founder of Benin’s Zinsou Foundation, about new models for what a museum can be. Brooklyn Museum director Anne Pasternak will also speak with Victoria Noorthoorn, director of the Museo de Arte Moderno de Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Franklin Sirmans, director of the Pérez Art Museum Miami, about how their institutions are adapting to the present moment. The back-to-back talks will stream on Facebook Live, or you can register for the program on Zoom.

Price: Pay what you wish
Time: 6 p.m.–7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, January 14–Saturday, February 13

Polina Barskaya, Bovina Living Room with Cat, 2020 Courtesy of Monya Rowe Gallery

4. “Me, Myself and I: Polina Barskaya, Aubrey Levinthal, and Justin Liam O’Brien” at Monya Rowe Gallery

Monya Rowe Gallery presents a three-person exhibition of new works by artists Polina Barskaya, Aubrey Levinthal, and Justin Liam O’Brien. The show consists of figurative works that look inwards to create everyday narratives that are widely relatable. Themes of self-reflection and introspection are highlighted as “each artist harnesses their psychological experiences to engender their work and create a space for personal significance,” according to the gallery.

Location: Monya Rowe Gallery, 224 West 34th Street #1005, New York, NY 10001
Price:
 Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Neha Jambhekar

 

Thursday, January 14–Tuesday, February 16

A painting by Aida Mahmudova. Courtesy of Sapar Contemporary.

A painting by Aida Mahmudova. Courtesy of Sapar Contemporary.

5. “Aida Mahmudova: PASTPRESENTFUTURE” at Sapar Contemporary, New York

The latest project from Sapar Contemporary’s Central Asian Incubator for women artists of Central Asia and the Caucuses features Azerbaijani painter Aida Mahmudova, who embeds materials including grass, dry plants, copper, and ceramics into her layered canvases depicting the landscapes of her homeland.

Location: Sapar Contemporary, 9 North Moore Street, New York
Price:
 Free
Time: Opening viewing January 14 and 15 for groups under eight, 5 p.m.–7 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone 

 

Thursday, January 14–May 1

Artwork by Hiba Schahbaz. Photo courtesy of Art Production Fund.

Artwork by Hiba Schahbaz. Photo courtesy of Art Production Fund.

6. “Hiba Schahbaz: In My Heart” at Rockefeller Center, New York

Hiba Schahbaz takes over unused ad spaces in the latest offering from Art Production Fund. The artist, known for her mythological self portraits, has created paper cut-outs featuring garden scenes and female figures amid the doldrums of winter in New York. The highlight will be a 125-foot-long site-specific mural at the concourse of 45 Rockefeller Plaza, while smaller lightbox displays are inspired by traditional Indo-Persian miniature paintings.

Location: Rockefeller Center, 10, 30, 45, and 50 Rockefeller Plaza, New York
Price:
 Free
Time: Open daily at all times

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, January 15–Saturday, March 20

David-Jeremiah, detail of <i>Hamborghini Rally: Soul Hunt City ('72 Dartón)</i> (2019). Courtesy of Gallery Kendra Jayne Patrick.

David-Jeremiah, detail of Hamborghini Rally: Soul Hunt City (’72 Dartón) (2019). Courtesy of Gallery Kendra Jayne Patrick.

7. “David-Jeremiah: Play” at Halsey McKay x Gallery Kendra Jayne Patrick, East Hampton

In this compact East Hampton solo exhibition, David-Jeremiah presents five paintings interpolating the disturbingly relevant legacy of Micah Xavier Johnson. In 2016, Johnson, a former US Army carpenter, fatally shot five Dallas police officers in an act of vigilante retribution for generations of violence carried out by law enforcement against Black Americans. He then became an even more surreal footnote in the nation’s macabre history of race relations when police leveraged a never-before-used weapona bomb-defusing robot equipped with a live explosiveto kill Johnson in his hideout. Jeremiah channels these events and their aftermath into a series of works inspired by simulated racing games. Called “Hamborghini Rally: Soul Hunt City,” the paintings communicate how bigotry creates a never-ending “us vs. them” contest in which each side’s grim score will only ever continue escalatinguntil, or unless, this country finally disconnects the white supremacist circuitry powering the whole enterprise from the start.

Location: Halsey McKay, 79 Newtown Lane, East Hampton
Price: Free
Time: Friday–Monday, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. (and by appointment)

—Tim Schneider

 

Friday, January 15–Saturday, February 27

Patrick Angus, <em>Hanky Panky</em> (1990). Photo courtesy of Bortolami.

Patrick Angus, Hanky Panky (1990). Photo courtesy of Bortolami.

8. Three shows at Bortolami

There’s one hell of a tripleheader opening at Bortolami this Friday. In the main exhibition space is what is sure to be a stunning exhibition of work by the late Patrick Angus, who died of AIDS in 1992 at the age of 38. The show spans decades of his practice and features a number of works from the last decade of his life, spent in New York, capturing the explosion of culture at the city’s innumerable gay bars, bathhouses, and sex clubs with lush, gloriously rendered paintings and works in paper, many made from life. As if you needed more, in an anteroom there’s a show by the indefatigable Tom Burr that is sure to be a delight. And upstairs in the gallery’s second floor viewing room is a group show put together by the fearless critic David Rimanelli featuring three of the most exciting artists around: Kayode Ojo, Borna Sammak, and Chivas Clem.

Location: Bortolami, 39 Walker Street, New York
Price: Free
Time: 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Nate Freeman

 

Saturday, January 16–Sunday, February 21

Xiao Wang, Slumber (After Goya) – Dusk, 2020 Courtesy of Deanna Evans Projects

9. “A Collective Escape” at Deanna Evans Projects, Brooklyn

Deanna Evans Projects’ inaugural exhibition in its new Brooklyn space featuring works by eight emerging artists and was organized through a blind open call juried by Elizabeth Buhe, Alejandra Jassan, and Nickola Pottinger. The result is a collection of eight beautiful works that depict the possibilities of escapism—a much explored topic during the harrowing year of 2020.

Location: Deanna Evans Projects, 1329 Willoughby Avenue, #171 E, Brooklyn
Price:
 Free
Time: January 16 and 17, 12 p.m.–8 p.m.; and by appointment

—Neha Jambhekar

 

Saturday, January 16

Concept art for Derek McPhatter Afro-futurist and Afro-surreal dreamscapes. Designed by Daria Borovkova. Photo courtesy of MCA Chicago.

Concept art for Derek McPhatter Afro-futurist and Afro-surreal dreamscapes. Designed by Daria Borovkova. Photo courtesy of MCA Chicago.

10. “The Dreamscape” at MCA Chicago

As part of “The Long Dream,” an exhibition of more than 70 local Chicago artists on view through May 2, the MCA Chicago is hosting virtual events showcasing time-based and live performances, with a wide offering of livestreamed music, conversations, and video art. Audiences can tune in to the programming of their choosing throughout the day, such as a DJ set with Sadie Woods or the premiere of new works by Eduardo F. Rosario, Selina Trepp, and others.

Price: Pay what you wish
Time: 2 p.m.–6 p.m. CT

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Sunday, January 24

Installation view of "Kambui Olujimi WALK WITH ME." Photo courtesy of Project for Empty Space.

Installation view of “Kambui Olujimi WALK WITH ME.” Photo courtesy of Project for Empty Space.

11. “Kambui Olujimi WALK WITH ME” at Project for Empty Space, Newark

For this first show in the gallery’s new home, Newark’s Project for Empty Space presents a selection of 177 ink-wash works on paper by Kambui Olujimi, each a portrait of his mentor, Catherine Arline, who died in 2014. Based on a single photograph of the subject from the 1950s, when she was just 18, the artworks memorialize Arline and her larger-than-life role in the Bedford-Stuyvesant community where the artist grew up.

Location: Project for Empty Space, 800 Broad Street, Newark
Price:
 Free
Time: By appointment, Thursday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

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