Year

Kickstart the New Year With 5 Fascinating Artists From the Midnight Publishing Group Gallery Network to Check Out This Month


Every month, we at the Midnight Publishing Group Gallery Network comb through our expansive platform and select five artists that catch our eye, and we think are ones to watch. With the New Year upon us, and more amazing art around now than ever before, this month’s group of artists is particularly exciting. All currently have solo shows on view, from Naples to New York, and employ everything from avant-garde digital technology to vintage and historic styles and motifs in their practice.

These five artists are sure to impress as well as inspire you to explore the thousands of art and artists to be found through Midnight Publishing Group’s Gallery Network.

Leunora Salihu at Galerie Thomas Schulte, Berlin

Leunora Salihu, Turm (2022). Courtesy of Galerie Thomas Schulte, Berlin.

Leunora Salihu, Turm (2022). Courtesy of Galerie Thomas Schulte, Berlin.

Originally from Kosovo, Leunora Salihu’s (b. 1977) sculptural work uses diverse combinations of materials, including metal, wood, and ceramic. Drawing inspiration from industrial and architectural design, as well as from organic forms, Salihu has developed her own distinct compositional lexicon that can be recognized by the apparent functionality of her pieces. Her current solo exhibition at Galerie Thomas Schulte, Berlin, focuses on recent work that expands the boundaries of her investigations into form and space. Turm (2022), for example, resembles a massive speaker tower but is actually comprised largely of glazed ceramic. The exhibition also features Salihu’s works on paper, which illustrate the experimental, design-oriented nature of her practice.

Tursic & Mille at Alfonso Artiaco, Naples

Tursic & Mille, Le déséspoir du peintre (Saxifrage des ombrages) (2022). Courtesy of Alfonso Artiaco, Naples.

Tursic & Mille, Le déséspoir du peintre (Saxifrage des ombrages) (2022). Courtesy of Alfonso Artiaco, Naples.

The artist duo Tursic & Mille, comprised of Ida Tursic (b. 1974) and Wilfried Mille (b. 1974), began their artistic partnership in the early 2000s, engaging purposefully with painting in a period when the medium’s popularity was waning. Originally from Serbia and France respectively, the artists draw inspiration from both historic and contemporary visual media, from Old Masters to 20th-century pop culture. Their current show, “Tursic & Mille: Disastri,” on view at Alfonso Artiaco, Naples, centers on the idea of catastrophe theory in mathematics, which refers to the phenomenon where a minor change to the input of an equation causes a major change in the solution. Using humor, satire, and fanciful juxtapositions in their work, the exhibition invites viewers to immerse themselves in the unique and sometimes uncanny artistic worlds the duo creates.

Lori Grinker at Clamp, New York

Lori Grinker, Untitled (Mike Tyson on the balcony...) (1986). Courtesy of Clamp, New York.

Lori Grinker, Untitled (Mike Tyson on the balcony…) (1986). Courtesy of Clamp, New York.

Hailing from Freeport, New York, Lori Grinker (b. 1957) became interested in photography as a teenager and went on to study photography at the Parsons School of Design, where she was tutored by professors such as Lisette Model and Bernice Abbot. While enrolled, Grinker had the opportunity to photograph young boxers, including the then 13-year-old Mike Tyson, and her images were published in Inside Sports magazine. Grinker’s solo exhibition of photographs “Mike Tyson,” shown by Clamp gallery in New York, corresponds with the publication of the monograph of the same name by Powerhouse Books. The exhibition and book trace Grinker’s ongoing photographic relationship with Tyson, from those early images of the fighter as a child in the early 1980s to ones showing him traveling the world as he became a global household name.

Carolyn Oberst at Stellarhighway, New York

Carolyn Oberst, Still Life with Japanese Screen (1996). Courtesy of Stellarhighway, New York.

Carolyn Oberst, Still Life with Japanese Screen (1996). Courtesy of Stellarhighway, New York.

Currently based in New York City, Carolyn Oberst’s interdisciplinary practice spans painting, drawing, wood relief, video animation, and more. She takes as a starting point the immensely personal yet widely relatable environment around her as well as themes of intuition, dreams, and memory. Presented by Stellarhighway in New York, Obserst’s solo exhibition “Where Parting Is No More” features a selection of works from a series made between 1989 and 1998 that involve vintage framed mirrors from old dressers. Refurbishing these dresser-back frames and replacing the mirrors with canvas, the object/paintings become a conduit for Oberst’s internal world, which is conveyed through her vibrant, imaginative painting.

Holger Bär at Galerie Deschler, Berlin

Holger Bär, Central Park (2022). Courtesy of Galerie Deschler, Berlin.

Holger Bär, Central Park (2022). Courtesy of Galerie Deschler, Berlin.

German artist Holger Bär (b. 1962) has a practice that is decidedly contemporary but with a pervasive air of the historic. Frequently using imagery and compositions associated with the Impressionists, Bär’s work evokes the pointillist style of Georges Seurat. But this is achieved through the use of modern computers and technology, namely self-developed algorithms and a photographic printer that utilizes eight (rather than the typical four) colors. The images are an analytical interpretation of the pointillist, Impressionistic style, wherein one’s eye perceives a realist composition when the work is viewed from a distance, but up close the individual points of color are distinct from one another. Bär’s current show with Galerie Deschler, Berlin, “11.500.000 Punkte,” features a range of recent works that highlight the artistic and conceptual artistic connection between the artist and Impressionism.

Explore and find more new artists to watch with Midnight Publishing Group Gallery Network.

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In an Expansion, the Rubell Museum Will Bring Its Tastemaking Private Art Collection to Washington, D.C., Next Year


Miami’s Rubell Museum, one of the most prestigious and influential private contemporary art institutions in the U.S., is expanding with a long-awaited second location in Washington, D.C.

Founded by Don and Mera Rubell, the institution is a showcase for their extensive art collection. For emerging artists, the Rubell’s patronage (and a coveted residency at the museum) can be star-making—Sterling Ruby, Oscar Murillo, Lucy Dodd, and, most recently, Amoako Boafo are among the many artists who have benefitted from their stamp of approval.

The couple began collecting art the year they married, back in 1964. In 1993, they began welcoming the public to the Rubell Family Collection in Miami’s Wynwood neighborhood. In 2019, the private museum movedwith great fanfare—to the city’s Allapattah neighborhood, rebranding itself the Rubell Museum.

The new D.C. branch will display contemporary paintings, sculptures, photography, and installation art in the former Randall Junior High School. The property has a long history in Washington. Originally built in 1906, the school operated until 1978, when the city converted it into a men’s shelter and artist studios.

The Corcoran College of Art + Design bought the building from the city in 2006 and planned to develop it into a campus and luxury condominiums, but the project foundered after the financial crisis. The Rubells, who own the Capitol Skyline Hotel down the street, bought the building from the Corcoran for $6.5 million back in 2010, according to Art in America.

Plagued by delays and partnership changes (last year, the real estate developer Lowe took over the project), the redevelopment now appears to be back on track. It is expected to open by the end of 2022.

Mera Rubell at the construction site for the second location of Miami's Rubell Museum, formerly the Randall School in Washington, D.C. Photo courtesy of Blinder Belle Architects and Planners.

Mera Rubell and and Hany Hasson, the lead architect for the project from Beyer Blinder Belle, at the site for the second location of Miami’s Rubell Museum, formerly the Randall School in Washington, D.C. Photo courtesy of Blinder Belle Architects and Planners.

The Rubells will take over the central building and east wing, adding a glass entry pavilion designed by Beyer Blinder Belle Architects and Planners featuring a bookstore, café, and an outdoor dining terrace. The west wing will serve as office space for a variety of companies in creative fields such as nonprofits, cultural institutions, and technology incubators.

A spokesperson for the Rubells declined to offer additional details about their plans for the museum. The couple’s collection includes extensive holdings of work by Keith Haring, Jeff Koons, Catherine Opie, Kerry James Marshall, and other famous names.

Lowe, the project’s developer, is also building Gallery 64, a new 12-story residential building, on the 2.7 acre grounds. It will house 492 units of studio, one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments, 98 of which will be dedicated to affordable housing. The Historic Preservation Review Board and the Advisory Neighborhood Commission have approved the concept design for the historic property’s redevelopment.

The museum’s 100,000-square-foot Miami campus, designed by Selldorf Architects, features 40 galleries, a library, and a restaurant housed in a retrofitted food processing complex.

See more renderings of the D.C. project below.

The Randall School in Washington, D.C., will become home to the second location of Miami's Rubell Museum and a new Gallery 64 apartment building. Rendering courtesy of Blinder Belle Architects and PlannersThe Randall School in Washington, D.C., will become home to the second location of Miami's Rubell Museum and a new Gallery 64 apartment building. Rendering courtesy of Blinder Belle Architects and Planners

The Randall School in Washington, D.C., will become home to the second location of Miami’s Rubell Museum and a new Gallery 64 apartment building. Rendering courtesy of Blinder Belle Architects and Planners.

The Randall School in Washington, D.C., will become home to the second location of Miami's Rubell Museum and a new Gallery 64 apartment building. Rendering courtesy of Blinder Belle Architects and Planners

The Randall School in Washington, D.C., will become home to the second location of Miami’s Rubell Museum and a new Gallery 64 apartment building. Rendering courtesy of Blinder Belle Architects and Planners.

The Randall School in Washington, D.C., will become home to the second location of Miami's Rubell Museum and a new Gallery 64 apartment building. Rendering courtesy of Blinder Belle Architects and Planners.

The Randall School in Washington, D.C., will become home to the second location of Miami’s Rubell Museum and a new Gallery 64 apartment building. Rendering courtesy of Blinder Belle Architects and Planners.

The Randall School in Washington, D.C., will become home to the second location of Miami's Rubell Museum and a new Gallery 64 apartment building. Rendering courtesy of Blinder Belle Architects and Planners.

The Randall School in Washington, D.C., will become home to the second location of Miami’s Rubell Museum and a new Gallery 64 apartment building. Rendering courtesy of Blinder Belle Architects and Planners.

The Rubell Museum DC will be located at 65 Eye Street, SW, Washington, D.C.

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Art Dealers Are Shocked to Realize That 2020 Was Actually a Historically Good Year for Business + Other Stories


Art Industry News is a daily digest of the most consequential developments coming out of the art world and art market. Here’s what you need to know on this Wednesday, February 24.

NEED-TO-READ

Nicole Eisenman Gets the New Yorker Profile Treatment – The star painter goes to visit her mom in Scarsdale, New York, in her recent New Yorker profile. Kay Eisenman explains that Nicole had trouble in school (one psychologist said she had a “grave mental disability”), but Kay says she was “an amazing child from the minute she opened her eyes—she took everything in.” Eisenman recalls life in gritty 1980s New York, when she began combining a cartoon sensibility with political art. She recalls her burgeoning style as “subjecting Richie Rich to whatever torturous fantasies I had.” (New Yorker)

David Adjaye Helped Recreate a Famed Mural – The 1199 Service Employees International Union managed to entice leading architect David Adjaye to take on the redesign of their new building. Even though it was a small project for his firm, Adjaye says he took the job because he admired the organization’s social commitment. The project came with one wrinkle: Adjaye had to reproduce the group’s famous social-realist mosaic mural by Anton Refregier, which is now facing demolition and unable to be moved. The architect remade the mural as separate pieces throughout the new building and added extra glass tiles documenting the recent history of the union. (New York Times)

American Museums Ask Congress for Relief Funds – The American Alliance of Museums has asked federal lawmakers to approve a funding boost for museums that are still suffering from shutdowns. The organization declared Monday and Tuesday as Museum Advocacy days, during which its supporters will petition Congress to increase funding for shuttered venues and expand charitable tax deductions to encourage more Americans to donate to museums. (The Art Newspaper)

Bank of England Will Remove Images of Slave Owners – As a culture war brews in the UK over controversial historic monuments, the Bank of England has vowed to move ahead with a review of its art collection to identify imagery of former governors with links to slavery. The goal is “to ensure none with any such involvement in the slave trade remain on display anywhere in the bank,” according to a statement. The news clashes with a recent announcement from the UK government encouraging institutions to “retain and explain” problematic monuments. (TAN)

ART MARKET

Galleries Are Thriving During Lockdown – The art market “is raging,” according Los Angeles dealer François Ghebaly. His best year to date was 2020, despite the global pandemic and curbs on art fairs and travel. And he’s not alone. The main reason for the surprising success is that, while sales were down in some cases, there were no major expenses, which helped to balance the books. (Bloomberg)

Collector Who Bought Kanye’s Teenage Art Trove Speaks Out – Vinoda Basnayake was only a law student when he helped promote a Kanye West performance at a Washington, DC, club. Years later, after seeing one of West’s relatives present the music star’s childhood art on Antiques Roadshow, he tracked them down to buy it for himself. “I’ve always been really interested in the origin of artists, and where the art comes from,” Basnayake said. (Complex)

COMINGS & GOINGS

Cameron Shaw Named Director of California’s African American Museum – The museum’s deputy director and chief curator since 2019, Shaw plans to focus on four themes for the museum in upcoming programming: Black abstraction, Black spirituality, liberating the Black archives, and environmental justice. (LA Times)

Artist James Bishop Dies at 93 The Missouri-born minimalist abstract painter died in the French town of Dreux, not far from his residence in Blévy. The artist, who described himself as “an Abstract Expressionist of the quieter branch,” was known for compositions of just a few colors. (ARTnews)

FOR ART’S SAKE

Spain Removes Last Statue of Franco – In a Spanish town on the border of Morocco, the last statue of the Spanish dictator Francisco Franco has come down. The monument was erected in 1978 to commemorate the fascist leader’s role in the Rif War between the Berber tribes and Spaniards in the 1920s. (Guardian)

Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari Shoot Vanity Fair’s Hollywood Issue – The artists, who founded the cult favorite magazine Toiletpaper, managed to pull off a remote fashion shoot for the most recent cover of Vanity Fair, which features leading lights of Tinseltown including Spike Lee, Michael B. Jordan, and Zendaya. (Vanity Fair)

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A Banksy Mega-Collector Just Bought the Mural of a Girl With a Hula Hoop That Appeared in Nottingham Last Year


An art dealer has purchased a recent Banksy mural of a girl playing hula hoop with a bicycle tire from property owners in Lenton, Nottingham, as the market for the anonymous street artist’s work continues to climb.

Banksy painted the mural on October 13 of last year, chaining a bent bike with a missing back wheel next to it in an apparent reference the Raleigh Bicycle Company, which has called Nottingham home since it was founded in 1887. The artist claimed the work as his own several days later in an Instagram post.

Dealer John Brandler, of Brandler Galleries in Essex, paid six figures for the piece, which had been placed under a protective plastic cover, which the gallerist feared might damage it.

“If you put Perspex over a picture, the moisture gets into the brick wall and can’t escape—the wall needs to breath,” he told the BBC, noting that he had hired a “very specialized company” with experience moving Banksy’s work to cut through the brick wall to extricate the work of art.

Banksy, Snow (2018). Photo courtesy of the artist.

Banksy, Snow (2018). Photo courtesy of the artist.

This is not Brandler’s first Banksy; he also purchased Seasons Greetings, an image of a child tasting “snowflakes” falling from a dumpster fire, that the artist painted in the polluted city of Port Talbot in late 2018. The dealer put the work on display just across town, at the Street Art Museum in Wales.

An illicit Banksy piece can drive up property values, and his work in the streets has been known to attract thieves. The sale of a 2014 piece valued at $670,000 helped save a youth club in the artist’s hometown, Bristol, with the artist’s blessing. Banksy’s auction record stands at £9.9 million ($12.1 million) for the framed painting Devolved Parliament.

Brandler plans to include his newest acquisition in “Moments: An Exhibition of Modern Art,” opening in May at the Moyse’s Hall Museum in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk.

Banksy, <em>Heart Boy</em> (2009). Photo courtesy of the Moco Museum Amsterdam.

Banksy, Heart Boy (2009). Photo courtesy of the Moco Museum Amsterdam.

The show will also include Banksy’s Heart Boy, a 2009 mural of a boy painting a graffiti heart that was salvaged before the demolition of a London building. The work was purchased by Amsterdam’s Moco Museum in 2016 and has never been exhibited in London, according to the gallery.

Banksy has been outspoken in his disapproval of the sale of his street art, and his company, Pest Control, reportedly told the Nottingham Project, the city’s rejuvenation board, that he wished that the bicycle artwork would remain in place.

“We think it’s a great shame that Nottingham has lost its Banksy,” a Nottingham Project spokesperson told the BBC. “We hope this doesn’t stop the artist coming back to the city in the future.”

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The Art Angle Podcast: Our 5 Favorite Episodes of the Year


Welcome to the Art Angle, a podcast from Midnight Publishing Group News that delves into the places where the art world meets the real world, bringing each week’s biggest story down to earth. Join host Andrew Goldstein every week for an in-depth look at what matters most in museums, the art market, and much more, with input from our own writers and editors, as well as artists, curators, and other top experts in the field.

 

There are a lot of things about 2020 that we’d all like to forget, but bright spots still shined through, too, including here on the Art Angle.

To celebrate the podcast’s first full year, our producers compiled a chronological quintet of their favorite episodes from the past 12 months. They cover ups, downs, and in-betweens; activists standing up, fugitives running for cover, and outsiders building something new; art history, the political present, and what might come next.

Put it all together, and the collection provides a whirlwind audio tour through a kaleidoscopic year in the borderlands where the art world meets the real world.

Listen below and subscribe to the Art Angle on Apple PodcastsSpotifySoundCloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. (Or catch up on past episodes here on Midnight Publishing Group News.)

 

1. How the Art World Fell Under the Spell of the Occult – January 28

If you’ve ever wondered how or why pagan imagery, witchcraft, spiritualism, and other branches of the occult became one of the most prominent propellers driving contemporary art today, author and critic Eleanor Heartney has the answers you seek, traveler.

 

2. How an Art-Dealing Prodigy Became the Market’s Most Wanted Outlaw – March 3

Midnight Publishing Group News senior market reporter Eileen Kinsella charts the rise and fall of Inigo Philbrick, the fast-rising young dealer who disappeared into the mist after a slew of lawsuits cast his success as a product of fraud rather than business savvy. (Philbrick was eventually apprehended on a South Pacific island in June.)

 

3. Four Artists on the Front Lines of the George Floyd Protests – June 5

Ebony Brown, Candy Kerr, Marcus Leslie Singleton, and Darryl Westly give searing firsthand accounts of their experiences as Black American artists who turned to collective action in the wake of the tragedy that pushed social and racial justice to the forefront of the national conversation.

 

4. The Secret Art History of Burning Man – August 27

Burning Man cofounder and photographer Will Roger takes listeners on a rollicking odyssey through the counterculture festival’s history, from its origin as a casual beach party between friends, to a global phenomenon in the Black Rock Desert that is rewriting the definition of 21st century art.

 

5. Ed Ruscha and Jimmy Iovine on How Art Can End the Trump Era – October 28 

It’s not often you get to hear one of contemporary art’s greatest living talents hold court with one of music’s greatest living producers on the sociocultural power of art, but it happened here on the Art Angle just ahead of the 2020 presidential election. (You can also find the transcript here.)
Thanks for listening, and see you next year!

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