Modern

China Gets Its First Zaha Hadid Retrospective With a Blowout at the Modern Art Museum Shanghai—See Highlights Here


The British Iraqi architect Zaha Hadid was a powerhouse in her field, creating iconic buildings from Rome’s MAXXI Museum to Michigan’s Broad Art Museum, the Guangzhou Opera House, and the London Aquatic Center for the 2012 Olympics. Dubbed the “Queen of the Curve,” Hadid was the first woman to earn the coveted Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2004. Though she died in 2016, her legacy endures.

Now, the first retrospective of Hadid’s work in mainland China is on view at the Modern Art Museum Shanghai, with a sold-out exhibition titled “ZHA Close Up: Work & Research.” The show looks at Hadid’s career chronologically, tracing her decades-long practice and unique stylistic imprint.

Hadid first visited China in 1981, finding parallels to her native Iraq in the serpentine waterways and rivers that carved up the metropolis and rural landscapes. Local visitors to the show will note the many projects her design firm had a hand in, from the Beijing Daxing International Airport (completed posthumously in 2019) to the notable Guangzhou Opera House of 2010.

The exhibition is organized on the principles that guide Zaha Hadid Architects, including sustainability; computation and design; and “ZH social”—that is, analyzing social interaction in designed environments using data and virtual reality. The show also includes work from Zaha Hadid Design (ZHD), a separate arm formed in 2006 based on Hadid’s interest in contemporary design manifested in furniture, lighting, and fashion.

“I am excited to include, as part of our interdisciplinary and immersive approach at MAM, this important exhibition, celebrating Zaha Hadid’s ingenuity,” artistic director of MAM Shanghai Shai Baitel said in a statement. “Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) continues and expands on her legacy and MAM is proud to present this show, granting unprecedented insights into the vision of one of the most important architects of our time.”

See works from the show, below.”ZHA Close Up: Work & Research” is on view at MAM Shanghai through August 29, 2021. 

Installation view, "ZHA Close Up: Work and Research" at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

Installation view, “ZHA Close Up: Work and Research” at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

Installation view, "ZHA Close Up: Work and Research" at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

Installation view, “ZHA Close Up: Work and Research” at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

Installation view, "ZHA Close Up: Work and Research" at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

Installation view, “ZHA Close Up: Work and Research” at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

Installation view, "ZHA Close Up: Work and Research" at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

Installation view, “ZHA Close Up: Work and Research” at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

Installation view, "ZHA Close Up: Work and Research" at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

Installation view, “ZHA Close Up: Work and Research” at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

Installation view, "ZHA Close Up: Work and Research" at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

Installation view, “ZHA Close Up: Work and Research” at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

Installation view, "ZHA Close Up: Work and Research" at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

Installation view, “ZHA Close Up: Work and Research” at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

Installation view, "ZHA Close Up: Work and Research" at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

Installation view, “ZHA Close Up: Work and Research” at MAM Shanghai. Photo: Liang Xue.

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The Art Angle Podcast: How Two Painters Helped Spark the Modern Conservation Movement


Welcome to the Art Angle, a podcast from Midnight Publishing Group News that delves into the places where the art world meets the real world, bringing each week’s biggest story down to earth. Join host Andrew Goldstein every week for an in-depth look at what matters most in museums, the art market, and much more with input from our own writers and editors as well as artists, curators, and other top experts in the field.

Right now there is a powerful, highly ambitious, and deeply relevant art show in New York that weaves together the histories of conservation and American art in a way most people haven’t seen before.

It’s a quick jag from the city across the Rip Van Winkle Bridge into Catskill, New York, but light years away from the bustling metropolis, where on either side of the river are the historic homes of the famed Hudson River School painters Thomas Cole and Frederic Church in New York’s Hudson River Skywalk Region.

Inside those homes—the Thomas Cole National Historic Site and Olana State Historic Site—sprawls the show titled “Cross-pollination: Head, Cole, Church, and Our Contemporary Moment,” with art that spans the mid-19th century to today, the exhibition is built around a suite of 16 bravura paintings of hummingbirds titled “The Gems of Brazil” by the little known Hudson River School artists, Martin Johnson Heade, and it takes flight from there exploring a network of interconnections between art, science, and the natural world.

It also provides rich insight into the story of the relationships at the heart of the show between Heade, Thomas Cole, and Frederic Church, three of the greatest visionary artists America has ever known.

This week on the podcast, Andrew Goldstein is joined by Thomas Cole National Historic Site curator Kate Menconeri to discuss how these historic artists first began thinking about ideas of conservation and preservation, and how contemporary artists have taken up the mantle to encourage a new generation not only to appreciate nature, but how to give back what for years we’ve been taking from it.

 

Listen to Other Episodes:

The Art Angle Podcast: The Hunter Biden Controversy, Explained

The Art Angle Podcast: Legendary Auctioneer Simon de Pury on Monaco, Hip Hop, and the Art Market’s New Reality

The Art Angle Podcast: 18-Year-Old NFT Star Fewocious on How Art Saved His Life, and Crashed Christie’s Website

The Art Angle Podcast (Re-Air): How Photographer Dawoud Bey Makes Black America Visible

The Art Angle Podcast: Tyler Mitchell and Helen Molesworth on Why Great Art Requires Trust

The Art Angle Podcast: How High-Tech Van Gogh Became the Biggest Art Phenomenon Ever

The Art Angle Podcast: How Much Money Do Art Dealers Actually Make?

The Art Angle Podcast: What Does the Sci-Fi Art Fair of the Future Look Like?

The Art Angle Podcast: How Kenny Schachter Became an NFT Evangelist Overnight

The Art Angle Podcast: How Breonna Taylor’s Life Inspired an Unforgettable Museum Exhibition

Shattering the Glass Ceiling: Art Dealer Mariane Ibrahim on the Power of the Right Relationships

The Art Angle Podcast:‘Art Detective’ Katya Kazakina on How She Lands Her Epic Scoops

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Sotheby’s $221.3 Million Impressionist and Modern Sale Was Solid, But Proves the True Market Fireworks Are Elsewhere


Sotheby’s Impressionist and Modern art evening sale capped off a marathon night that saw collectors welcomed back to its New York salesroom for the first time in over a year.

The offering of 33 lots (one was withdrawn just prior to the sale) pulled in a solid total of $221.3 million, just under the original high estimate of $222.8 million. (The estimate was revised downward after the withdrawal, to $166.9 million–219.3 million.) Of the lots offered, 31, or 94 percent, found buyers.

These final results belied uneven appetites. Aside from intense competition for a handful of star lots, particularly from Asian buyers, the action was unpredictable. Certain works sold far below their estimates, suggesting some reserves had been lowered in the lead-up to the sale due to lackluster interest. (Unless otherwise stated, final prices include auction-house premiums; presale estimates do not.) 

The top lot of the evening, Claude Monet’s Le Bassin aux nymphéas (1917–19), sold for $70.3 million, well over its estimate of around $40 million. That’s more than four times the $16.8 million price it made at Sotheby’s in May 2004. This time around, the work went to a client of specialist Gregoire Billault in New York after fierce competition from Hong Kong. It is now the fifth priciest Monet ever sold at auction.

Art law specialist Thomas Danziger represented clients from the estate of Philadelphia philanthropist Tristram Colket, an heir to the Campbell’s soup fortune, who consigned four major works to the sale

Danziger summed up the mood, telling Midnight Publishing Group News: “Generally good sale results, but hard to square the selling price of a spectacular Cézanne with the price achieved by a Bitcoin Banksy.” (He was referencing a $12.9 million Banksy in the contemporary sale that evening, which more than doubled its $5 million high estimate and marked the first time that Sotheby’s said it would accept cryptocurrency as a form of payment for a physical work.)

Paul Cezanne, Nature morte pommes et poires (Circa 1888-90). Image courtesy Sotheby's.

Paul Cézanne, Nature morte pommes et poires (Circa 1888–90). Image courtesy Sotheby’s.

Two of Colket’s works, which did not carry guarantees, hammered below or near their low estimates. A Cézanne still life, Nature morte: pommes et poires (circa 1888-1890), sold for $19.9 million with premium, far short of its published $25 million to $35 million estimate.

The muted reception was similar for Colket’s Degas dancer, Danseuse (circa 1880–87), which sold for a hammer price of $10 million—exactly the low estimate—to a Sotheby’s specialist in London. Of the final two Colket works (both Monets), a landscape failed to sell and a floral still life sailed past its $6 million high estimate to fetch $10 million.

One of the rare works that sparked protracted bidding was Picasso’s Femme assise en costume vert (1953), a portrait of the artist’s lover and mother of two of his children, Françoise Gilot. Sotheby’s Asia chairman Patty Wong won it on behalf of a client for $20.9 million with premium. 

Amedeo Modigliani, <i>Jeune fille assise, les cheveux dénoués (Jeune fille en bleu)</i> (1919). Image courtesy Sotheby's.

Amedeo Modigliani, Jeune fille assise, les cheveux dénoués (Jeune fille en bleu) (1919). Image courtesy Sotheby’s.

Toward the end of the sale, the intensity picked up again for a painting by Diego Rivera, Retrato de Columba Dominguez de Fernandez (1950). The final price with premium was $7.4 million, far above the $2 million to $3 million estimate.

Another notable element of the evening was the structure of guarantees—including the volume that Sotheby’s fronted itself and then farmed out to third parties to offload some of the risk. A week prior to the sale, just one of 10 guaranteed lots was backed by an outside bidder. That figure rose to 11 out of a total of 14 guaranteed lots by the time the sale kicked off on Wednesday.

Pablo Picasso, <i>Femme assise en costume vert</i> (1953). Image courtesy Sotheby's.

Pablo Picasso, Femme assise en costume vert (1953). Image courtesy Sotheby’s.

One of the works that secured a guarantee in the run-up to the sale was Amedeo Modigliani’s Jeune fille assise, les cheveux dénoués (Jeune fille en blue), which carried an estimate of $15 million to $20 million. It hammered for $14 million after protracted competition between two specialists, including Helena Newman in London, for whom it was almost breakfast time as the sale came to a close.  

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