Midnight

Kickstart the New Year With 5 Fascinating Artists From the Midnight Publishing Group Gallery Network to Check Out This Month


Every month, we at the Midnight Publishing Group Gallery Network comb through our expansive platform and select five artists that catch our eye, and we think are ones to watch. With the New Year upon us, and more amazing art around now than ever before, this month’s group of artists is particularly exciting. All currently have solo shows on view, from Naples to New York, and employ everything from avant-garde digital technology to vintage and historic styles and motifs in their practice.

These five artists are sure to impress as well as inspire you to explore the thousands of art and artists to be found through Midnight Publishing Group’s Gallery Network.

Leunora Salihu at Galerie Thomas Schulte, Berlin

Leunora Salihu, Turm (2022). Courtesy of Galerie Thomas Schulte, Berlin.

Leunora Salihu, Turm (2022). Courtesy of Galerie Thomas Schulte, Berlin.

Originally from Kosovo, Leunora Salihu’s (b. 1977) sculptural work uses diverse combinations of materials, including metal, wood, and ceramic. Drawing inspiration from industrial and architectural design, as well as from organic forms, Salihu has developed her own distinct compositional lexicon that can be recognized by the apparent functionality of her pieces. Her current solo exhibition at Galerie Thomas Schulte, Berlin, focuses on recent work that expands the boundaries of her investigations into form and space. Turm (2022), for example, resembles a massive speaker tower but is actually comprised largely of glazed ceramic. The exhibition also features Salihu’s works on paper, which illustrate the experimental, design-oriented nature of her practice.

Tursic & Mille at Alfonso Artiaco, Naples

Tursic & Mille, Le déséspoir du peintre (Saxifrage des ombrages) (2022). Courtesy of Alfonso Artiaco, Naples.

Tursic & Mille, Le déséspoir du peintre (Saxifrage des ombrages) (2022). Courtesy of Alfonso Artiaco, Naples.

The artist duo Tursic & Mille, comprised of Ida Tursic (b. 1974) and Wilfried Mille (b. 1974), began their artistic partnership in the early 2000s, engaging purposefully with painting in a period when the medium’s popularity was waning. Originally from Serbia and France respectively, the artists draw inspiration from both historic and contemporary visual media, from Old Masters to 20th-century pop culture. Their current show, “Tursic & Mille: Disastri,” on view at Alfonso Artiaco, Naples, centers on the idea of catastrophe theory in mathematics, which refers to the phenomenon where a minor change to the input of an equation causes a major change in the solution. Using humor, satire, and fanciful juxtapositions in their work, the exhibition invites viewers to immerse themselves in the unique and sometimes uncanny artistic worlds the duo creates.

Lori Grinker at Clamp, New York

Lori Grinker, Untitled (Mike Tyson on the balcony...) (1986). Courtesy of Clamp, New York.

Lori Grinker, Untitled (Mike Tyson on the balcony…) (1986). Courtesy of Clamp, New York.

Hailing from Freeport, New York, Lori Grinker (b. 1957) became interested in photography as a teenager and went on to study photography at the Parsons School of Design, where she was tutored by professors such as Lisette Model and Bernice Abbot. While enrolled, Grinker had the opportunity to photograph young boxers, including the then 13-year-old Mike Tyson, and her images were published in Inside Sports magazine. Grinker’s solo exhibition of photographs “Mike Tyson,” shown by Clamp gallery in New York, corresponds with the publication of the monograph of the same name by Powerhouse Books. The exhibition and book trace Grinker’s ongoing photographic relationship with Tyson, from those early images of the fighter as a child in the early 1980s to ones showing him traveling the world as he became a global household name.

Carolyn Oberst at Stellarhighway, New York

Carolyn Oberst, Still Life with Japanese Screen (1996). Courtesy of Stellarhighway, New York.

Carolyn Oberst, Still Life with Japanese Screen (1996). Courtesy of Stellarhighway, New York.

Currently based in New York City, Carolyn Oberst’s interdisciplinary practice spans painting, drawing, wood relief, video animation, and more. She takes as a starting point the immensely personal yet widely relatable environment around her as well as themes of intuition, dreams, and memory. Presented by Stellarhighway in New York, Obserst’s solo exhibition “Where Parting Is No More” features a selection of works from a series made between 1989 and 1998 that involve vintage framed mirrors from old dressers. Refurbishing these dresser-back frames and replacing the mirrors with canvas, the object/paintings become a conduit for Oberst’s internal world, which is conveyed through her vibrant, imaginative painting.

Holger Bär at Galerie Deschler, Berlin

Holger Bär, Central Park (2022). Courtesy of Galerie Deschler, Berlin.

Holger Bär, Central Park (2022). Courtesy of Galerie Deschler, Berlin.

German artist Holger Bär (b. 1962) has a practice that is decidedly contemporary but with a pervasive air of the historic. Frequently using imagery and compositions associated with the Impressionists, Bär’s work evokes the pointillist style of Georges Seurat. But this is achieved through the use of modern computers and technology, namely self-developed algorithms and a photographic printer that utilizes eight (rather than the typical four) colors. The images are an analytical interpretation of the pointillist, Impressionistic style, wherein one’s eye perceives a realist composition when the work is viewed from a distance, but up close the individual points of color are distinct from one another. Bär’s current show with Galerie Deschler, Berlin, “11.500.000 Punkte,” features a range of recent works that highlight the artistic and conceptual artistic connection between the artist and Impressionism.

Explore and find more new artists to watch with Midnight Publishing Group Gallery Network.

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These Six Works Available in the Midnight Publishing Group Auctions Sale ‘ArtNFT: Beginnings’ Are Redefining Generative Art


Generative and Artificial Intelligence art might sound like something straight out of a science fiction film. However, the idea that an artwork can be created by a machine, devoid of the human hand, or created by autonomous and algorithmic systems, isn’t far-fetched at all. For the past six decades, artists have been experimenting with technology, creating computer art, media art, video art, and digital art, and eventually tokenizing artworks on the blockchain.

Now, Midnight Publishing Group’s first NFT auction, “ArtNFT: Beginnings,” is centered on the historical trajectory of digital art and its touch points with the development of NFTs. Read on to learn about seven artists, including Dmitri Cherniak, Vuk Ćosić, and Georg Nees, who have been at the forefront of Generative and A.I. art movements, and whose works are live for bidding through December 21 in “ArtNFT: Beginnings.”

 

Dmitri Cherniak
Ringers #887 (2021)

Dmitri Cherniak, Ringers #887, (2021). Available now in “ArtNFT: Beginnings” on Midnight Publishing Group Auctions. Est.: 70-90 ETH ($272,000-349,000).

“Automation is my artistic medium. Hand coded goods,” Dmitri Cherniak has written. On January 31, 2021 the Canadian artist made a splash with the launch of his “Ringers” project on Artblocks, a program that hosts generative content on the Ethereum blockchain.

The series, which is capped at 1,000 unique NFTs, is based on the premise that there are an almost infinite number of ways to wrap a string around a set of pegs. “Ringers” are a computer-generated algorithmic series, created from Javascript code, and each work has its own unique transaction hash. Minimal in their aesthetics, “Ringers” are valued for qualities such as peg count, sizing, layout, background, wrap orientation, wrap style, scaling, body color, peg style, and extra color. Ringers #887 has a woven wrap style and a solid-filled black body which accentuates its visually striking, angular pattern. Notably, Ringer #109 sold for 2,100 ETH ($6.9 million at the time), making it the most expensive Art Blocks NFT sold to date.

Cherniak got his start in crypto in 2014, and while he has been probing the implications of blockchain-based generative art for years, it was not until 2019 that he began sharing his own work, remaining dedicated to algorithmic diversity in his practice.

 

Vuk Ćosić
Deep ASCII (1998)

Vuk Ćosić, Deep ASCII (1998). Available now in “ArtNFT: Beginnings” on Midnight Publishing Group Auctions. Est.: 12-15 ETH. ($46,600-$58,300).

Slovenian artist Vuk Ćosić is best known for his role as a founding pioneer of net.art, an internet art movement that started in 1994, and for his early application of encoding technology to visual graphics. Ćosić seeks to sidestep the traditional methods of creating art by utilizing the digital sphere, however he emphasizes that the most high-tech technologies need not be applied. This artistic approach drove many of his projects, including the ASCII Art Ensemble, which features various moving images and videos in the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) characteristically formed by numbered coding patterns.

Emblematic of Ćosić’s pioneering spirit, Deep ASCII is an NFT conversion of his 1998 work of the same title, which depicts a scene from the pornographic film Deep Throat rendered in ASCII. 

 

Kevin and Jennifer McCoy
Quantum Leap (Primordial Star 2) (2021)

Jennifer and Kevin McCoy, Quantum Leap (Primordial Star 2) (2021). Available now in “ArtNFT: Beginnings” on Midnight Publishing Group Auctions. Est.: 40-60 ETH ($155,374-233,060).

Quantum Leap by Jennifer and Kevin McCoy is the longest-term generative artwork, evolving over a three year cycle. The code-based NFT is inspired by the artists’ 2014 work Quantum, the first ever artwork to be tokenized on the blockchain. 

Constantly moving through changing states, the NFT draws upon art-historical and scientific theories to evolve and spawn new versions of itself in real time, multiplying in a manner akin to the current ecosystem of social and technological innovation. Fast-paced and unpredictable, the work’s title refers to a physics theory that strives to answer questions about the initial phases of the universe. 

Primordial Star 2 is the second from a series of eight unique tokens which involve layers of code-based systems that interact to produce an expanding mandala-like digital animation, inspired by the consistently shifting life cycle of stars. Over the token’s three-year cycle, it will spawn offspring—new stars and descendant tokens that will possess their own parameters and unique visual rendering software patterns. 

 

Quayola
PP_F_024_2 (2015-21)

Quayola, PP_F_024_2 (2015-21). Available now in “ArtNFT: Beginnings” on Midnight Publishing Group Auctions. Est.: 8-12 ETH ($31,000-$46,600).

Italian artist Davide Quayola sees technology as complementary to classical religious iconography and traditional landscape imagery. Most often referred to as Quayola, the artist works with many mediums, including audiovisual performance, video, sculpture, and works on paper. PP_F_024_2 is an NFT that draws inspiration from Impressionism and suggests a new understanding of the natural world through collaboration with technology. The work is an algorithmic composition that blends opposite realms: nature and technology, representation and abstraction, and, ultimately, the human and machine. 

Inspired by the work of Vincent Van Gogh, Quayola visited the countryside in Provence some 130 years after the Dutch artist to capture some of the same iconic natural compositions. Quayola uses custom software to transform his source videos into algorithmic animations resembling real paint. PP_F_024_2, for example, was generated by the analysis of ultra-high-definition videos. 

 

Pindar Van Arman
Emerging Faces (2020)

Pindar Van Arman, Emerging Faces (2020). Available now in “ArtNFT: Beginnings” on Midnight Publishing Group Auctions. Est.: 60-80 ETH ($233,000-$310,800).

Pindar Van Arman is an American artist, roboticist, and pioneer of digital art. Van Arman has been building robots for use in his artistic practice since 2015, and he has programmed software applications such as CrowdPainter, bitPaintr and CloudPainter. Using Artificial Intelligence (AI) software, Van Arman’s robots hold a brush and paint patterns directed by an algorithm. 

 A pioneer of digital art, Pindar Van Arman is an American artist and roboticist. Van Arman has been building robots for use in his artistic practice since 2005 and has programmed CrowdPainter, bitPaintr and CloudPainter. All based on Artificial Intelligence software, Van Arman directs his robots to hold a brush and paint a pattern directed by an algorithm. 

Emerging Faces is the product of a collaboration between Van Arman and Robert “3D” Del Naja, a British street artist and a member of the electronic band Massive Attack. This work—an NFT accompanied by a physical work—combines Del Naja’s signature style with Van Arman’s technical coding abilities. A.I. layered the textures and colors of Del Naja’s paintings to create a composite idea of its dominant characteristics, as an exploration of facial recognition software. 

 

Desmond Paul Henry
#287 (1963)

Desmond Paul Henry, #287 (1963). Available now in “ArtNFT: Beginnings” on Midnight Publishing Group Auctions. Est.: 2.5-3 ETH ($9,700-$11,700).

Desmond Paul Henry is among the greatest pioneers in early computer art, now critically digested as a paramount predecessor of Generative art. In the 1960s, he constructed three mechanical drawing machines, with technology based on the analogue bomb-sight computers used during World War II aircrafts. Inspired by the “peerless parabolas” of the computers’ inner mechanisms, Henry attempted to recreate the mechanical motions using biro pens, tube pens, ink pens to create abstract, curvilinear, repetitive line drawings on paper.

#287 is a physical artwork, created by one of Henry’s drawing machines in multi-colored biros on paper.

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8 Artworks From the Midnight Publishing Group Gallery Network That Capture the Spirit of the Leo Sign


The fifth sign in the zodiac calendar, Leo, is represented by the celestial lion, and those born under the sign (July 23–August 22) are the zodiac’s most confident and loyal leaders. This is the season of selfies and celebrations. 

Leos are driven, devoted, and dramatic. These natural-born leaders love to be the center of attention and certainly know how to turn on the razzle-dazzle. Their confidence in their own charms can, on occasion, come across as arrogant and possessive. The truth is that they just like to be wined and dined, as well as to celebrate those around them. 

As collectors, they’ll love to host lavish private parties and show off their impeccable eye, while bolstering up emerging artists whenever they can. They’re likely to collect works that are bold, assured, and photograph well because they are absolutely going to post on social media.

Famous artists who were Leos include Andy Warhol, Marcel Duchamp, Florine Stettheimer, and Richard Prince. To celebrate the zodiac season, we’ve explored the Midnight Publishing Group Gallery Network to find artworks that celebrate the qualities that define big-hearted, driven, and generous sign.

 

Andi Fischer
OH OH ENDKAMPF (2019)
Sies + Höke Galerie
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Andi Fischer, OH OH ENDKAMPF (2019). Courtesy of Sies + Höke Galerie.

Andi Fischer, OH OH ENDKAMPF (2019). Courtesy of Sies + Höke Galerie.

 

Paul Chojnowski
Celestial Red & Green (2016)
Elizabeth Clement Contemporary
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Paul Chojnowski, Celestial Red & Green (2016). Courtesy of Elizabeth Clement Contemporary.

Paul Chojnowski, Celestial Red & Green (2016). Courtesy of Elizabeth Clement Contemporary.

 

William Fortescue
Brothers (2021)
Red Eight Gallery
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William Fortescue, Brothers (2021). Courtesy of Red Eight Gallery.

William Fortescue, Brothers (2021). Courtesy of Red Eight Gallery.

 

Nathaniel Mary Quinn
Big Hair (2020)
Gagosian
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Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Big Hair (2020). Courtesy of Gagosian.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Big Hair (2020). Courtesy of Gagosian.

 

Cleon Peterson
World on Fire (Black) (2020)
West Chelsea Contemporary
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Cleon Peterson, World on Fire (Black) (2020). Courtesy of West Chelsea Contemporary.

Cleon Peterson, World on Fire (Black) (2020). Courtesy of West Chelsea Contemporary.

Ken Gun Min
Green Plate (Lion and Deer-prayer for peace of mind) (2020)
K Contemporary
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Ken Gun Min, Green Plate (Lion and Deer-prayer for peace of mind) (2020). Courtesy of K Contemporary.

Ken Gun Min, Green Plate (Lion and Deer-prayer for peace of mind) (2020). Courtesy of K Contemporary.

Dave White
Lion II
ART LOFT Gallery
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Dave White, Lion II. Courtesy of ART LOFT Gallery.

Dave White, Lion II. Courtesy of ART LOFT Gallery.

 

David Yarrow
The King and I (2016)
Camera Work
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David Yarrow, The King and I (2016). Courtesy of Camera Work.

David Yarrow, The King and I (2016). Courtesy of Camera Work.

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As the New Museum Opens a Lynn Hershman Leeson Show, Check Out a Private Collection of Her Works on the Midnight Publishing Group Gallery Network


Every month, hundreds of galleries add newly available works by thousands of artists to the Midnight Publishing Group Gallery Network—and every week, we shine a spotlight on one artist you should know. Check out what we have in store, and inquire for more with one simple click.

 

About the Artist: Since the 1970s, American artist Lynn Hershman Leeson has focused her practice on the intersection of identity and technology. Her media-driven artworks have explored challenging ideas from artificial intelligence and DNA programming to the relationship between illness and technology. This month, the New Museum will open “Lynn Hershman Leeson: Twisted,” the artist’s first New York solo museum exhibition, which will include many of Hershman Leeson’s most important projects. Highlights include her wax-cast “Breathing Machine” sculptures (1965–68), works from her famed “Roberta Breitmore” series (1973–78), along with a recent large-scale work, Infinity Engine (2014–present), a multimedia installation focused on genetic engineering. 

Why We Like It: Hershman Leeson’s dynamic practice ranges from interactive, internet-based works and films to drawing, sculpture, and photography. Often visually alluring and at times surrealist, her creations interrogate the effects of our seemingly inextricably entwined relationships with technology and what the societal and personal implications of this intimate reliance might be. Plus, she started paying attention to these thorny issues long before you probably did. 

About the Collection: Throughout his lifetime, San Fransisco collector G. Austin Conkey was an ardent supporter of Hershman Leeson’s career. Conkey passed away in 2019, leaving behind a significant collection of her work, which can be explored on the Midnight Publishing Group Gallery Network. The collection presents a range of the artist’s creative pursuits, with Surrealist dinnerware, drawings, and multimedia collage all appearing. G. Austin Conkey lived and worked in San Fransisco, and from 1970 and 2000, passionately collected works from California’s influential ‘70s conceptual art movement. Also represented in his collection are Allen Adams (ReTooled), Paul Kos, and Tom Marioni. Conkey’s focused approach to collecting offers a unique time capsule of the art of a specific place and time.

 

Lynn Hershman Leeson
Painting Roberta’s Portrait (1975)
G. Austin Conkey Collection
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Lynn Hershman Leeson, Painting Roberta's Portrait (1975). Courtesy of the G. Austin Conkey Collection.

Lynn Hershman Leeson, Painting Roberta’s Portrait (1975). Courtesy of the G. Austin Conkey Collection.

Lynn Hershman Leeson
Lady Luck (1975)
G. Austin Conkey Collection
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Lynn Hershman Leeson, Lady Luck (1975). Courtesy of the G. Austin Conkey Collection.

Lynn Hershman Leeson, Lady Luck (1975). Courtesy of the G. Austin Conkey Collection.

 

Lynn Hershman Leeson
Tillie and Mirror (1998)
G. Austin Conkey Collection
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Lynn Hershman Leeson, Tillie and Mirror (1998). Courtesy of G. Austin Conkey Collection.

Lynn Hershman Leeson, Tillie and Mirror (1998). Courtesy of G. Austin Conkey Collection.

 

Lynn Hershman Leeson
“Performance Dinners” Ceramic Plate (1976)
G. Austin Conkey Collection
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Lynn Hershman Leeso, "Performance Dinners" Ceramic plate with 6 mouths with tongue out (1976). Courtesy of the G. Austin Conkey Collection.

Lynn Hershman Leeso, “Performance Dinners” Ceramic Plate with 6 Mouths with Tongue Out (1976). Courtesy of the G. Austin Conkey Collection.

Lynn Hershman Leeson
Untitled (Ronald Reagan) (1983)
G. Austin Conkey Collection
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Lynn Hershman Leeson, Untitled (Ronald Reagan) (1983). Courtesy of the G. Austin Conkey Collection.

Lynn Hershman Leeson, Untitled (Ronald Reagan) (1983). Courtesy of the G. Austin Conkey Collection.

 

Lynn Hershman Leeson
Woman (Gradient) (ca. 2003)
G. Austin Conkey Collection
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Lynn Hershman Leeson, Woman (Gradient) (ca. 2003). Courtesy of the G. Austin Conkey Collection.

Lynn Hershman Leeson, Woman (Gradient) (ca. 2003). Courtesy of the G. Austin Conkey Collection.

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Poet Kostas Anagnopoulos Shares His Favorite Artworks from Midnight Publishing Group Galleries


Kostas Anagnopoulos is a creative in every sense of the word.

Whether he is working to provide award-winning services to clients in the gift, home, jewelry, and personal-accessories industries, or teaching poetry remotely with Creative Growth in San Francisco, Kostas is a master at aesthetics. 

After more than 20 years of working closely with visionary merchants and top retailers, Kostas opened Pidgin, a store in Oak Hill, New York, to sell the things that he loves, from antiques and old objects, to a selection of beautifully crafted new items. 

We caught up with Kostas to hear about his bucket-list destination, what he’s read recently, and some of his favorite works available right now from Midnight Publishing Group Galleries.

Kostas’ Favorite Things

Movie: Daguerréotypes by Agnes Varda

Restaurant: Prune

Bucket-list destination: Easter Island

Artist: Florine Stettheimer

Food to eat for breakfast: Whitefish salad on a toasted bialy with red onion, capers, and a squeeze of lemon

Museum: The Kimbell Art Museum.

Book you’ve read recently: Days by Simone Kearney

Artist in your collection: Jack Whitten

Design object: Olfa touch-knife

Party favor: A book of contemporary poetry

Way to celebrate success: Nachos and orange wine

 

Top Gallery Picks

 

Jane Freilicher
Parts of a World (1987)

Courtesy of Kasmin.

 

Bill Traylor
Blue Basket (1939–42)

Courtesy of Ricco/Maresca.

Prunella Clough
Interior (1988)

Courtesy of Flowers Gallery.

 

Theodoros Stamos
“Infinity Field-Lefkada” Series (1981)

Courtesy of Hollis Taggart.

Joan Brown
Figure #26 (1970)

Courtesy of George Adams Gallery.

 

Alvin Baltrop
The Piers (Hudson River) (1975–86)

Courtesy of Galerie Buchholz.

 

Minnie Evans
Untitled (Wing Figures) (1942–43)

Courtesy of ZQ Art Gallery.

 

James Van Der Zee
Broadway Delicatessen (ca. 1925)

Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery.

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