architect

Airbnb Will Offer Overnight Stays at the First Home Legendary Architect Antoni Gaudí Ever Designed for Just $1


For the first time ever, members of the public will have a chance to spend a night in the first home designed by Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí. Airbnb is offering single-night stays at Casa Vicens in Barcelona for the low-low price of just €1 ($1.19).

The catch? You’ll have to be fast. The once-in-a-lifetime chance to stay at the masterpiece of Neo-Mudéjar Moorish revival architecture will be offered on a first-come-first-served basis once reservations open at 10 a.m. EST on July 12.

Airbnb describes the home as “a fabulous multi-colored oasis which fuses Moorish, neoclassical, and organic motifs,” promising that “guests who request to book this overnight stay will have the chance to spend the night in another stunning jewel decorated by Gaudí in his distinctive version of Art Nouveau.”

Built between 1883 and 1885 as a summer home for industrialist Manel Vicens i Montaner, the building served as a private residence until it went on the market in 2007 with a €35 million ($39.24 million) asking price. The Andorran bank MoraBanc finally bought it for an undisclosed amount in 2014, soon unveiling plans to turn the property into a museum.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

One of seven Gaudí buildings in the Barcelona area designated as World Heritage Sites by UNESCO in 2005, Casa Vicens opened to the public in 2017 after restorations. The Airbnb listing offers an all new way to experience the property. Two guests will get a private tour of the historic building from museum employee Emili Masferrer, the official Casa Vicens Airbnb host.

“I am part of the team that transformed this historic house into a museum and knowledgeable of all the secrets of its recent restoration project,” Masferrer said in his listing bio.

The stay will also include dinner with a “Gaudí-inspired Michelin star menu” from Barcelona restaurant Hofmann, served in the dining room, with a nightcap to follow in the smoking room, and a Mediterranean breakfast in the property’s private garden—”best croissants in town included!”

This isn’t the first time that Airbnb has teamed up with an art institution to offer a unique overnight experience. In 2019, the Louvre held a contest for a two-person sleepover at the Paris museum, with dinner and drinks in front of Leonardo da Vinci’s famed Mona Lisa. And in 2016, the Art Institute of Chicago recreated Vincent van Gogh’s bedroom and listed it on the vacation rental site for just $10 a night.

See more photos from the Casa Vicens Airbnb listing below.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

Casa Vicens. Photos by Belen Gonzalez, courtesy of Casa Vicens.

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Will Insley – Dystopic Architect, city of the future

What caught my eye was his piece entitled “/Building/ No. 36. Passage Space Hinge”.

Insley’s usage of monotonic lines to create a isometric perspective work of art is a bit overwhelming in areas. The patterns of lines work together to create a three-dimensional structure which appears to be moving underneath the surface.  The over-use of Pointillism is quite plentiful; this is more pronounced on the areas outside of the structure.

It is quite obvious that Insley felt his work as a potential architect would have been more appreciated on canvas instead of rolled
away on a blueprint. After finding this piece, I decided to dig around some to find the real ‘meaning’ behind his work. The artist described his own interests as having “very little to do with advanced planning theories of the present” and no relation really at all to the ”utopias of the future, but rather with the dark cities of mythology, which exist outside of normal times in some strange location of extremity.”

Insley’s monolithic project ‘Foundations OneCity’ took around fourty years of his time, starting in the 1950s.

will_insley

Building 36, on display at the NC Museum of Art

The idea behind OneCity was to have the United States encompass “one city” that spread from the Rocky Mountains to the Mississippi and would be the home of 400 million people.  The city was composed of 14,000 city square buildings, each 2-and-a-half-miles wide and each containing 100 rooms. The grandiose structure is designed to  divide the ‘day people’ or normals, and ‘night people’ aka weirdos between upper and lower sections, respectively.

Building 25

Building 25

 

Building 17

Building 17

Insley’s contemporary, seemingly endless lines and points are truly hypnotizing and bring on a world of wonder.

Will Insley, 1959-2011

Will Insley, 1959-2011